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Your Daily Sweets: What are you making and baking? (2014–)

Dessert

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#391 Blether

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 06:02 PM

I'm not sure whether to 'like' this, or call it out for not being a sweet.  You're still on the cheese course  :wink:


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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#392 janeer

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 07:01 PM

An elBulli "pre dessert": Gorgonzola Bonbon. A tiny slab of Gorgonzola embedded in Gorgonzola cream and dipped in very bitter chocolate. Good with Port.
 
Done.jpg

This is totally up my alley. On my list for this winter's opening of a vintage port.
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#393 Anna N

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 06:41 AM

Blondies to fulfill commitment made over here:


http://forums.egulle...e/#entry1983078

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Followed Kerry's recipe to a T except had no pecans so used walnuts which I had briefly toasted.
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#394 rotuts

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 07:04 AM

'butterscotch'  or 'brownsugar' taste ?



#395 Anna N

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 07:09 AM

'butterscotch'  or 'brownsugar' taste ?


Don't know that I could tell the difference. Not much of a one for sweets. Give me a cheese and onion sandwich over almost any sweet. I'll send them over to my daughter's house where hordes of teenage girls hang out. They'll disappear in the blink of an eye.
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#396 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 02:18 AM

A slightly non-traditional Sachertorte.  It was nice, but I'm not sure if it beats the original (when made well).

 

Sachertorte.jpg

 

2 Sacher cake layers (from Pierre Hermé)

Dark chocolate ganache (1:1)

Roasted plum coulis

Dark chocolate mousse (from Francisco Migoya)

Shiny dark chocolate glaze (also Migoya)

 

Btw, does anyone know how to preserve the light texture of a sponge cake after freezing?  Mine start off perfect, but in the finished cake they are far too dense.  I've tried messing around with trimoline, but I'm still not happy with the texture.  Any help is greatly appreciated, thanks.


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#397 Tri2Cook

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 07:56 AM

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Banana bread.


i couldn't take it anymore. Your banana bread posts were driving me, well, "bananas". I love banana bread but for some reason rarely make it (probably because I would eat way too much of it). Today is chilly, windy and raining. The perfect day to cave to temptation, so banana bread is in the oven now. I tempted fate by replacing part of the butter with some roasted walnut oil I wanted to use up. We'll see how that goes...


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#398 Anna N

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:04 AM

i couldn't take it anymore. Your banana bread posts were driving me, well, "bananas". I love banana bread but for some reason rarely make it (probably because I would eat way too much of it). Today is chilly, windy and raining. The perfect day to cave to temptation, so banana bread is in the oven now. I tempted fate by replacing part of the butter with some roasted walnut oil I wanted to use up. We'll see how that goes...


Right on. Must be a day for experimentation. I had about half a cup of mashed bananas left from a banana bread I made yesterday. I have adapted a recipe for chocolate chip bars and included those leftover bananas. We shall have to see.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#399 Anna N

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:44 AM

These came about because, as noted above, I had half a cup of leftover bananas. I googled and found a recipe for chocolate chip bars. I made a half recipe draining the bananas before adding them. There is a surprising amount of banana flavor in these bars. The half recipe made a quarter sheet pan 12 x 16 inches.


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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
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#400 Kerry Beal

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 12:06 PM

i couldn't take it anymore. Your banana bread posts were driving me, well, "bananas". I love banana bread but for some reason rarely make it (probably because I would eat way too much of it). Today is chilly, windy and raining. The perfect day to cave to temptation, so banana bread is in the oven now. I tempted fate by replacing part of the butter with some roasted walnut oil I wanted to use up. We'll see how that goes...

Bet it makes it even better!



#401 CatPoet

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 12:39 AM

20140824_135835_zpsd2ea709b.jpg

 

Pineapple cake, the batter was yummier then the cake, but the cake was good too.


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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#402 JohnT

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 12:17 PM

I am into making single or small portion desserts at the moment. Here are a few experiments this week with a few still in the experimenting stage and thus not shown here.
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This is a single portion "Melktert", a traditional South African tart made mainly with milk. It is made in a round 8cm pan

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These are 12cm diameter diameter lemon tarts made with a pate sucrée base. The filling is "creamed" lemon curd.

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And with Christmas just around the corner, the first batch of mini Christmas cakes - well laced with brandy to "preserve" them. They are 10cm diameter and 5cm in height.
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#403 Anna N

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 12:35 PM

John,
Your desserts look just delightful. Can you tell us more about the milk-based tart and the creamed lemon curd?
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#404 gfron1

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 02:05 PM

Yeah, really beautiful.  Looking forward to hearing more about the milk tarts - they look like Hoosier sugar cream.


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#405 JohnT

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 02:22 PM

Anna, the "Melktert" is Afrikaans (a language derived mostly out of Dutch) for "milk tart" and was originally a simple but tasty tart used by the Dutch farmers of the 1700's in what was called the Cape Colony, now South Africa. There are many recipes for it on the Internet, but most use a pastry shell, which was not used in the old days. My recipe comes from a Professor at one of universities here, who has a BSc in Home Economics, and is basically a crustless one - it uses a paste for the crust, which is paper thin when cooked with the tart. The original recipe from her is for six 23cm tarts (or 50 of my 8cm ones), which I adapted slightly. I have also scaled the recipe down to make one 23cm (or 9 x 8cm ones). Is really is a tasty custard that sets.

If anybody is interested, I can post the recipe.

The creamed lemon curd is a recipe I was given by a Swiss pastry chef who took me under his wing in the mid 70's - he taught me how to bake and make some really great desserts. I found it in an old folder the other day when going through some of my files - it nearly ended up being thrown away! It is a basic lemon curd (lemons off my tree in the garden) to which you whisk in quite a lot of butter once it has cooled to about 60°C. It fluffs the curd up a bit and adds that extra "touch" and mouth-feel to the curd. It also holds its own when cut. The pate sucrée recipe I now use was one posted by "jmacnaughtan" on eG and beats the recipe I originally used from my mentor. It really is simple and good!

John
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#406 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 06:25 PM

Anna, the "Melktert" is Afrikaans (a language derived mostly out of Dutch) for "milk tart" and was originally a simple but tasty tart used by the Dutch farmers of the 1700's in what was called the Cape Colony, now South Africa. There are many recipes for it on the Internet, but most use a pastry shell, which was not used in the old days. My recipe comes from a Professor at one of universities here, who has a BSc in Home Economics, and is basically a crustless one - it uses a paste for the crust, which is paper thin when cooked with the tart. The original recipe from her is for six 23cm tarts (or 50 of my 8cm ones), which I adapted slightly. I have also scaled the recipe down to make one 23cm (or 9 x 8cm ones). Is really is a tasty custard that sets.

If anybody is interested, I can post the recipe.

The creamed lemon curd is a recipe I was given by a Swiss pastry chef who took me under his wing in the mid 70's - he taught me how to bake and make some really great desserts. I found it in an old folder the other day when going through some of my files - it nearly ended up being thrown away! It is a basic lemon curd (lemons off my tree in the garden) to which you whisk in quite a lot of butter once it has cooled to about 60°C. It fluffs the curd up a bit and adds that extra "touch" and mouth-feel to the curd. It also holds its own when cut. The pate sucrée recipe I now use was one posted by "jmacnaughtan" on eG and beats the recipe I originally used from my mentor. It really is simple and good!

John

I'd love it if you'd post the recipe for the Melktart.  



#407 gfron1

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 08:37 PM

You absolutely must post the milk tart recipe!  Looks so perfect.


Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#408 JohnT

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 11:55 PM

SINGLE QUANTITY MELKTERT
Makes: 1 x 23cm single or 9 x 8cm mini tarts

Ingredients:
Crust:

20g salted butter
5ml sugar
1/3 large egg
60g cake flour
1.5ml baking powder
3.5ml salt
20 ml fresh full cream milk
Filling:
45g cake flour
30g cornflour
100g sugar
1 ml salt
500ml fresh full cream milk
1.5 extra large egg, separated
85g unsalted butter
ground cinnamon, for decoration

Method:
Preheat oven to 180°C (160°C for fan oven)
For Crust: Cream the butter and sugar together until light and creamy, add the egg and beat well.
Sift the dry ingredients together and add to the egg mixture and mix well.
Gradually add the milk to the mixture until a spreadable consistency. Spread with the back of a spoon onto the sides and base of the tart pan(s).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
For Filling: Sift the dry ingredients together. Mix with some of the milk to a smooth paste.
Heat the remaining milk in a heavy-based saucepan until boiling point.
Beat the egg yolks and add to the flour mixture, mix with some of the hot milk until smooth and gradually add to the remaining milk. Stir continuously over a moderate heat for 4 - 5 minutes, add the butter.
Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.
Beat the egg white until soft peaks and lightly fold into the milk mixture.
Divide the filling between the prepared crusts and spread evenly. Bake for 10 to 13 minutes or until set and light golden in colour.
Sprinkle with cinnamon and serve warm or at room temperature.

Source: Prof. Elain Vlok

Note 1: Traditionally the melktert filling is cooked with a large slice of naatjie peel in it and removed just before pouring into the tin. I skip doing this as I cannot discern any flavour difference in the result - my taste buds are old and decrepit.
Note 2: The above recipe is my scaled down one. If anybody wants the original for 6 x large tarts, just send me a PM and I will send it off and you can do the scaling up or down yourself.
Note 3: The original recipe used a mixture of self-raising and cake flour in the crust - I have adapted it to use only cake flour and thus the salt quantity is important.
Note 4: We only have cake flour and bread flour in South Africa, but I think our cake flour is pretty close to the US AP flour.

These tart are very common in South Africa and are served more with a cup of tea or coffee than as a dessert after a meal. Enjoy - John.

Edited by JohnT, 27 August 2014 - 12:08 AM.

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#409 Anna N

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 01:54 PM

Thanks very much, John.

Made raisin bread today

http://forums.egulle...14-–/?p=1983707
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#410 ruthcooks

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 02:02 PM

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Kim,
I was inspired by your coconut chocolate pound cake so made these four minis. Dividing up the batter was obviously challenging as one is much more mini than the others.

Anna--use your scales.  Zero out and weigh each pan.  Re-apportion as needed.  Easy to make even cakes this way!


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#411 Tri2Cook

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 04:37 PM

Anna--use your scales.  Zero out and weigh each pan.  Re-apportion as needed.  Easy to make even cakes this way!


Yep, I always scale my cake batter when doing multiple pans. "Picky S.O.B." is one of the milder things I've been called when people see me doing it. :biggrin: 

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#412 Kim Shook

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 08:04 PM

jmacnaughtan – I always swoon slightly when I see your beautiful cakes with that glass-like glaze.  I admire them so much and think about using one.  But then I get realistic and know that fluffy frosting hides a LOT of pastry sins!  I’ll stick with fluffy frosting and sprinkles and get my dose of beauty here at eG!

 

Anna – I LOVE the sound of banana chocolate chip bars!

 

JohnT – do tell!  Love the creamed lemon curd.  It looks and sounds divine!

 


Mr. Kim had his fantasy football draft at our house last night.  I’ve put the meal on the dinner thread, but here are the desserts.  World Peace cookies, Cracker Candy and Morgan Horse cookies:

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These are just amazingly good.  I’ve never made a better chocolate cooky.

 

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Crazy recipe – saltines, brown sugar and butter caramel, chocolate chips and chopped nuts.  You would ever guess that the base is a saltine.  The caramel oozes down into it while baking and turns it into a crisp, flakey, brittle crust. 

 

med_gallery_3331_119_143753.jpg

Just a simple cinnamon, clove and brown sugar cooky.  Really satisfying – you can make them thin and crisp or plump and chewy.  I chose chewy this time.

 


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#413 JohnT

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 12:31 PM

A few folk asked for my recipe for the creamed lemon curd. I think is a pretty standard curd recipe but I was always told that it has extra butter whipped in to add smoothness to the texture. If this is correct or not, I do not know as I have never made any other curd recipe. I have scaled down the original recipe - it was 4 times the quantity.

CREAMED LEMON CURD - FOR TARTS
Makes about 700ml

Ingredients:
225g sugar
finely grated zest of two or three lemons
4 large eggs
190ml fresh lemon juice
225g butter, cut into 15mm cubes and at room temperature

Method:
Over a pot of simmering water and in the metal bowl of a stand mixer, rub the sugar and zest together until the oils from the zest are incorporated into the sugar.

Whisk in the eggs well by hand then add the lemon juice, whisking until incorporated.

Simmer the water and cook the curd until it reaches just over 80°C and turns thick, stirring continually with a whisk. Then remove from the heat.

Set aside to cool to 60°C, then clip the bowl to your stand mixer with the paddle fitted. Whip on medium slow adding the cubed butter, a block or two at a time. Continue whipping on medium speed for 4 minutes after the last butter has been incorporated.

Spoon into prepared tart shells and cool.

Makes sufficient for 6 x fluted 12cm shells or 2 x fluted 23cm shells.

Note 1: Ensure that the lemons used to extract the juice are fully ripe or else the creamed curd will release moisture into the pastry shell.
Note 2: If you want no zest in the finished product, pass the curd through a fine sieve after incorporating the butter.

John
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#414 Katie Meadow

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 04:03 PM

Kim, your crazy cookie seems to be a tried and true recipe, often called Chocolate Caramel Cookie/ Bark or Chocolate Toffee Cookie.  Smitten Kitchen calls them "Chocolate Caramel Crack(ers)"! There is a variant that uses graham cracker instead of a saltine, which is how I first encountered them at a picnic; the baker claimed it was an old family recipe called Granny Grahams." To me, this is one cookie that is way more than the sum of its parts--definitely way better than you would guess-- and can be made from the most basic corner-store ingredients or dressed up a bit. I wonder how it originated. 



#415 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 04:10 PM

Kim, your crazy cookie seems to be a tried and true recipe, often called Chocolate Caramel Cookie/ Bark or Chocolate Toffee Cookie.  Smitten Kitchen calls them "Chocolate Caramel Crack(ers)"! There is a variant that uses graham cracker instead of a saltine, which is how I first encountered them at a picnic; the baker claimed it was an old family recipe called Granny Grahams." To me, this is one cookie that is way more than the sum of its parts--definitely way better than you would guess-- and can be made from the most basic corner-store ingredients or dressed up a bit. I wonder how it originated. 

Liz Sellar's Easy Candy in my cookbook - a recipe I got from a student who was the year behind me in medical school back in 1987.  I've made them with saltines mostly - but I've used matzo as well.



#416 Kim Shook

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 08:05 PM

Kim, your crazy cookie seems to be a tried and true recipe, often called Chocolate Caramel Cookie/ Bark or Chocolate Toffee Cookie.  Smitten Kitchen calls them "Chocolate Caramel Crack(ers)"! There is a variant that uses graham cracker instead of a saltine, which is how I first encountered them at a picnic; the baker claimed it was an old family recipe called Granny Grahams." To me, this is one cookie that is way more than the sum of its parts--definitely way better than you would guess-- and can be made from the most basic corner-store ingredients or dressed up a bit. I wonder how it originated. 

Yes, indeed.  Greater than the sum of its parts perfectly describes these!

 

Liz Sellar's Easy Candy in my cookbook - a recipe I got from a student who was the year behind me in medical school back in 1987.  I've made them with saltines mostly - but I've used matzo as well.

What was the difference between regular saltines and matzo, Kerry?  Sounds interesting.  



#417 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 05:15 AM

I think I liked the saltine version a bit better - probably the salt made the difference but I think depending on the matzo you use they are a bit crispier too.  



#418 JohnT

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 06:40 AM

My next experiment with single portion desserts was accomplished on my second attempt at using ring molds for unbanked cheesecakes. I did a small batch of them yesterday afternoon and froze overnight. The first batch was a disaster as I had just finished putting in the product when I realised I had forgotten to use the acetate strips in the molds. Oh well, my only employee went home with a good amount of cheesecake for her family and kids.

This batch worked out brilliantly and produced 15 individual portions. The base is digestive biscuits whizzed in the food processor with some cocoa powder, small amount of sugar and a bit of melted butter as a binder. The cheesecake part is cream cheese, melted white chocolate, cream and a bit of gelatine to help stabilize it a bit. Then I just dripped a bit of melted dark chocolate on top and swirled it a bit with a skewer.

image.jpg
A close-up of one.

image.jpg
15 of the cheesecakes in their foil containers, ready for packaging.
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#419 Anna N

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 11:46 AM

This morning my best friend showed up bearing gifts, which she often does. She brought a new, to me, cookbook, some lovely baking pans and best of all six overripe bananas!

The two grocery stores that I frequent do not have reduced produce racks. I think because if they did they'd have to put all their produce on it! So overripe bananas are as rare as hens' teeth. Yes I realize I could buy bananas and let them get overripe. But that is just not the point.

Anyway back in July I made a promise to member caroled to make Hawaiian banana bread. She provided the recipe but until today I never seemed to have all the necessary ingredients. This morning I had everything except the bananas!

This recipe could not be easier to put together.


http://forums.egulle...rt-2/?p=1979798

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Thanks, caroled. They look and smell amazing.
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#420 pastrygirl

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 11:54 AM

JohnT, nice work!  I have actually had good luck without acetate strips, just using stainless steel rings sprayed inside with pan release and refrigerating the dessert several hours but not freezing.  I've done no-bake cheesecake and mousse-ier things.  I warm the ring with my hands for a few seconds then either let the food slide down to the plate or put it on something (like the top to the pan spray can) and push it up and out.  Of course, the product is going to be a little more easily damaged if it is just set and not frozen, but it can be done, and you don't get the weeping that can happen with freezing and thawing.  This worked for me in a restaurant setting, where I felt the desserts were better protected in the service fridge if left in the rings, but they needed to be useable at a moments notice.  Your needs may vary.


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