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Your Daily Sweets: What are you making and baking? (2014–)

Dessert

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#331 CatPoet

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 09:31 AM

Some do, does who eat organic most often do. Rot month isnt a set time, but it comes most often around august , it is when the heat and humidity peaks and we end up with algae  blooms, everything seams to mold faster then you can say Bob, veggies goes bad and it is the peak season  of food poising.

Most often it is over in 14   to 20 days , not fun.  Even with fridges  veggies  goes bad  during this time, it seams that they over grow or something.  I talked to one of the growers and even she said nothing can be stored at the moment . It is different all over Sweden  when it hits and how hard it hits. 


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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#332 pjm333

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 12:37 PM

Biscotti 

Attached Images

  • biscotti2.jpg

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#333 Matthew Kirshner

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 01:15 PM

Biscotti 

Those look great, makes me want to grab a hot cup of coffee.  Are those macadamia nuts, or hazelnuts in the choc ones? 



#334 Kim Shook

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 07:30 PM

emmalish – blush, blush!  I’m honored!  And you must try Toast Dope!  I always have a jar in the fridge.  I haven’t made regular old cinnamon toast for 7 years!

 

pjm – gorgeous biscotti!  I was especially drawn to the chocolate ones.  Any chance you’d share the recipe?

 

On Friday my sister and niece took off driving to Washington State.   I made some treats for the cross country trip – Dream cookies:

med_gallery_3331_119_55556.jpg

 

And my oatmeal cookies:

med_gallery_3331_119_31937.jpg

 

Also some granola clusters:

med_gallery_3331_119_129933.jpg

 

 

For Mr. Kim’s office picnic on Saturday, I made a brown sugar pound cake:

med_gallery_3331_119_191869.jpg

 

Then on Sunday I made a chocolate chip coffee cake for coffee hour at church:

med_gallery_3331_119_113697.jpg

 

med_gallery_3331_119_146639.jpg

Both were very popular.  


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#335 emmalish

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 07:40 PM

Kim, seriously, I don't know why you'd want to live next to me for cookies. Look at you! I swear you're the most prolific baker here! And always such a great variety.  :wub:

 

Now what, pray tell, are dream cookies??


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#336 CatPoet

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 11:07 PM

Kim.  The dream cookies, arent inspired of Swedish recipe?  Just wonder   because when I google they come up as Swedish.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#337 aliénor

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 01:10 PM

this is what i made for a potluck bbq tonite. so easy and delicious-1.jpg


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#338 Kim Shook

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:16 PM

emmalish – you are so kind.  Here is the recipe for Dream Cookies:http://http://www.re...am_Cookies.html

They are similar to shortbread – very buttery and crisp and I’ve been making them since I was a little girl – about 45 years.  They are our family’s favorite cookies.

 

CatPoet – see my response to emmalish regarding the cookies.  I looked at some recipes and descriptions of Swedish dream cookies and I don’t think they are the same.  The Swedish ones are light and airy and mine are dense and crisp like shortbread.  I really don’t know where the name for mine came from.  The recipe was in a book from a series of books that my mom got from a grocery store. 

 

alienor – what a lovely tart!

 

Dessert last night was Eton mess with blackberries, toasted coconut meringues and lime curd (meringues and curd were purchased):

med_gallery_3331_172_107956.jpg

The blackberries and lime was a very, very good combination!


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#339 CatPoet

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 10:29 PM

KimShook: well if you use baking ammonia  the cookies becomes  light and airy and if you dont it become dense.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#340 emmalish

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:08 PM

emmalish – you are so kind.  Here is the recipe for Dream Cookies:http://http://www.re...am_Cookies.html

They are similar to shortbread – very buttery and crisp and I’ve been making them since I was a little girl – about 45 years.  They are our family’s favorite cookies.

 

Thanks Kim! I've pinned it and will be trying soon! By the way, cinnamon chips? I've never seen those before but I'll bet they'd be fantastic. 


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#341 CatPoet

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:25 PM

The recipe is the same as the old time  Dream cookies but not with baking ammonia.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#342 pjm333

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 12:44 PM

The chocolate biscotti have hazelnuts in them and this is the recipe I used. 

http://www.joyofbaki...utBiscotti.html



#343 Foodfacts Dotus

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 06:43 PM

Wow, I'm new and I just scrolled through a bunch of this forum and you guys are really, really, talented. Here are a few pics of some stuff I've worked on.

 

4th Cupcakes 1.jpg Alcholic Cupcakes.jpg Easter Cake.jpg Gears Of War Cake 1.jpg Gears Of War Cake 2.jpg Poker Cake 1.jpg Poker Cake 2.jpg Raziel 1.jpg Rosette Cake 1.jpg Rosette Cake 2.jpg

 

I'm pretty proud of the Gears of War cake since it was my first attempt at using fondant. My rosette cake ended up melting by the time I got to my destination, guess it was to warm. The Chololate cupcakes had stout beer in the batter, Jack Daniels in the filling, and irish liquor in the frosting.


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Did You Know?
Maine exports 100% of the blueberries from the US. 500 tons to Japan and over 100 tons to Iceland each year.
(Ask me about my blog for more facts like this)

#344 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

I've been having fun with gum paste, myself.  The full herd of sheep is 21 (the second ram was commissioned as an anniversary present.) but Kaamilah was turning 3 - this ensured everyone in her class could have one.  

 

AmaVidaSheep2.jpg

RainbowRams2.jpg

SheepCake3.jpg

SheepCake2.jpg

SheepCake1.jpg

 

I've also been breaking in my new piping tips….  I sure do love IMBC!

 

MochaBaroque.jpg


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Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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#345 IowaDee

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 12:14 PM

I would like an entire flock of those sheep please, they are adorable.  Imagine pre-dyed wool!  And the lacy cake is stunning.  You are a true artist.


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#346 emmalish

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 01:47 PM

OMG, Elizabeth! Those are the cutest things ever!! I second IowaDee – I would like an entire flock of those.  :wub:  Are those pretzel stick legs?


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I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#347 Anna N

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 02:57 PM

Elizabeth,

Those sheep are the bees knees! Such talent you have.
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#348 rotuts

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 03:36 PM

PC:  so much talent there !

 

should a child see this at the right age

 

they will remember it forever !

 

:biggrin:


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#349 Smithy

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 05:27 PM

I have a friend who won't tell her age, but we know she's in her mid-90's. I think if she could have a cake like that with 1 sheep per year, she'd be willing to be specific. Those sheep are adorable!
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#350 Foodfacts Dotus

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 06:51 PM

I second everyone else, I love those sheep and that is a great take on 'Chantilly Lace'.


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Did You Know?
Maine exports 100% of the blueberries from the US. 500 tons to Japan and over 100 tons to Iceland each year.
(Ask me about my blog for more facts like this)

#351 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 09:50 AM

I had another go with the Victoria Sponge, and this one's a lot better.  Lighter, fresher, generally just tastes better.  I'll try it once more as a full-size entremet though.

 

Victoria Individual.jpg

 

Victoria sponge cake

Strawberry confit

Molten (extremely soft set) raw peach compote

Roasted apricot mousse

Apricot glaze

Apricot

 

Victoria Individual Cut.jpg


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#352 Blether

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:22 AM

Fantastic!  What did you change for the sponge?


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#353 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:44 AM

Surprisingly enough, I didn't change the recipe at all- it was more the ratio of sponge to the other components.  Cutting it back to a half-centimeter layer (the whole cake here was no more than around a couple of inches high, and the entremet was 2cm of cake for 4.5cm total) meant that it didn't dominate the fruit.

 

I may still tinker with the recipe though, it was still a little dense for my liking.  Maybe that's unavoidable when it's frozen...



#354 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:46 AM

I would like an entire flock of those sheep please, they are adorable.  Imagine pre-dyed wool!  And the lacy cake is stunning.  You are a true artist.

 

OMG, Elizabeth! Those are the cutest things ever!! I second IowaDee – I would like an entire flock of those.  :wub:  Are those pretzel stick legs?

 

I'd bet they'd ship quite well from Ecuador to Iowa and Vancouver, via priority courier.  I can make them in polymer clay instead, if you want them to be more permanent than pastillage.  How many sheep do y'all figure are in a flock?

 

They are indeed pretzel stick legs.  Most of my sugar art is 100% edible, no wire frame ligatures or anything.  They're about 1.5 to 2 oz each in total weight - I had to roll the fondant extra thick and let it dry completely so that it would support the weight of the flock; they're anchored with simple Royal.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
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#355 CatPoet

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 12:09 PM

I made   almond and yogurt  fairy cakes and to make them even more fairy cake like, I by mistake flavoured them with Fairy washing up liquid....  Yeap bin fodder .  The silicon cases  I was using apparently is soaked in washing up liquid and we dont know why or how.  They been  rinsed  6 times now and they still foams...


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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#356 Foodfacts Dotus

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 05:24 PM

I can't believe how intricate all of the baked goods on here look. I'm sure you'll say it isn't as hard as it looks but it still must take some time and patients. Great Job!


Did You Know?
Maine exports 100% of the blueberries from the US. 500 tons to Japan and over 100 tons to Iceland each year.
(Ask me about my blog for more facts like this)

#357 CatPoet

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 02:18 AM

So I made new almond fairy cakes and this time  without  washing up liquid.  They are so yummy, buttery , toffee  goodness in a little package.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#358 Smithy

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 06:04 AM

So I made new almond fairy cakes and this time  without  washing up liquid.  They are so yummy, buttery , toffee  goodness in a little package.


Congratulations on getting your molds clean! :-D

I'm curious about an almond fairy cake with toffee notes. Is this a recipe you can share?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#359 CatPoet

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 07:30 AM

Almond fairy cakes.
75 gram of butter
½ cup sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
½ cup flour
½cup almond flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1/8 teaspoon of baking soda
½ cup of greek yogurt
2 tablespoon of honey
1 or 2 dropp almond extract
 
Preheat the oven to 350 C
 
Get out  12 cupcake (fairy cake) casins or  cupcake tray.
 
Whisk sugar butter and egg smooth.
Mix flour, baking soda, baking powder, almond flour and stir into the  egg butter mix.  Add the yogurt, vanilla, honey and almon extract and whisk smooth.
 
Pour into the cups, half fill the cups. Bake for 25- 30 min.
 
This doesnt become high domed fairycakes, they are rather flatt, I gott 11 and not 12. But the  flavour is ace.
 
 
There is recommned to have a  whipped butter cream topping with toasted walnuts or almonds to it but I love them as they are.
 
Oh and they 1970 style so they are small, which is great in my world.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#360 Blether

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 07:48 PM

I made a batch of flapjacks.  They wouldn't all fit in the biscuit box, so I wrapped the extra couple of pieces in foil.

 

2014-07-31%2005.02.34.jpg

 

Basic ratio 3:3:4, sugar:butter:rolled/porridge oats.

 

Sugar - 8oz soft brown + 1oz golden syrup

Butter 9oz

Oats 12oz

pinch of salt

 

I added sliced almonda and leftover broken cashews, chopped sultanas and chopped dried apricots.  When I opened the bag of apricots they said "chocolate" very clearly, so I added 2oz milk chocolate to the melted butter/sugar mix.  Next time I'd take an ounce or an ounce and a half out of the butter quantity to compensate, as the flapjack ended up a bit greasy underneath, but the little bit of chocolate works really well in the caramel.  Which is ironic since the apricots that invited it disappeared, flavour-wise.  They're in there and they're chewy, but their apricotness isn't assertive.

 

Baked at 170C, in the end i think it was 35 minutes.  Anyway, watching the colour and the state of the caramel to take them out so's they'll be nice & chewy.  The tray being 20cm x 25cm (8" x 10"), they ended up about 3/4" thick.   So I need a bigger tray to get the 1/2" I was aiming for.


Edited by Blether, 31 July 2014 - 07:49 PM.

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