Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Storing/Holding Homemade Bread

Bread

  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 nelson87

nelson87
  • participating member
  • 12 posts
  • Location:Southern Connecticut

Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:46 PM

Hello All,

 

What is the best way to store sandwich bread, made following Rose Beranbaum's recipe?

Storage time no more than 7 days.

 

Thanks in advance,

Nelson87



#2 Okanagancook

Okanagancook
  • participating member
  • 314 posts
  • Location:Naramata overlooking Lake Okanagan, British Columbia, Canada

Posted 06 March 2014 - 03:13 PM

I like to store my bread wrapped two layers of aluminium foil and in the fridge to prevent mould growing. The two of us don't ate a lot of bread so I usually cut the loaves in half and freeze them wrapped in the foil.

#3 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,364 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 06 March 2014 - 03:44 PM

I never refrigerate breads of any type.  Modern fridges, draw moisture out, even when well wrapped and hasten staling.

 

I slice and freeze four slices each in small ziplock bags if I need to store it for longer than a few days.  Otherwise I store the whole loaf in a bread bag  and slice as needed for 4-5 days. 

 

Some people complained that there were no twist ties with the bags but I don't use them anyway.  I fasten them with medium binder clips.


  • Lisa Shock likes this
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#4 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,810 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:04 PM

I do the same as Andie with the bread bags though I use the ones from Smart & Final. Under their First Street Label they sell gallon size bags - 150 w/ ties for $7 I think. They are useful for other items so the quantity works for me. I store in a hall closet that is the coolest spot in the house and does not have anything scented in it that would transfer.

Edited by heidih, 06 March 2014 - 04:05 PM.

  • andiesenji and Lisa Shock like this

#5 Shel_B

Shel_B
  • participating member
  • 2,630 posts
  • Location:San Francisco Bay Area

Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:51 PM

I slice and freeze four slices each in small ziplock bags if I need to store it for longer than a few days.  Otherwise I store the whole loaf in a bread bag  and slice as needed for 4-5 days. 

 

 

So what makes a bread bag a bread bag?  I always use the various bags that come from the loaves of bread we buy at various bakeries or markets.


Edited by Shel_B, 07 March 2014 - 12:59 PM.

.... Shel


#6 Ann_T

Ann_T
  • participating member
  • 1,065 posts
  • Location:Cobble Hill

Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:52 PM

I've been using the same method for years.  Loaves that are going to be frozen, are wrapped first in paper towels and then they go into freezer bags. Loaves that are not frozen are usually eaten within 24 to 36 hours.

 

~Ann



#7 janeer

janeer
  • participating member
  • 1,249 posts

Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:20 PM

I freeze bread that I will not eat within 2 days, cut to sizes that when removed will last a few days, in heavy duty foil. I use bread bags for the bread on the counter.

#8 cakewalk

cakewalk
  • participating member
  • 1,592 posts

Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:30 PM

I slice sandwich loaves and freeze the slices. I've never used RLB's recipe, but this works with just about anything. It needs to be wrapped well, but I don't go too crazy over it, 2 supermarket plastic bags and it's fine. In the morning before I go to work I take out 2-3 slices, throw some sandwich fixings in a container (or not; sometimes I buy), and at lunchtime I put together a sandwich. Bread that I'm not using for sandwiches I freeze whole.



#9 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,471 posts

Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:38 PM

Bread has two parts; soft interior and crispy crust. Soft interior needs moisture and heat to soften, and the crust needs high dry heat to get crispy.

 

So how do you reconstitute frozen bread? 

 

Here is what I do:

 

Use a thin ceramic tile to cover each open end of the loaf and bake in a toaster oven.

 

The high heat crisps up the crust and drives the steam into the interior. The ceramic tiles insulate the high heat, trap the steam to moisten, soften and to gently heat the interior.

 

Seems to work very well for me. Give it a try and let me know if you get the same result.

 

dcarch



#10 David Hensley

David Hensley
  • participating member
  • 144 posts
  • Location:Roanoke, VA

Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:13 PM

Dcarch, is there anything that you can't OVERcomplicate? lol

 

Me, I just bake loaves that I know will be used inside of 4-5 days. On those few occasions that I think it will mold before it is consumed, I freeze, then slice frozen, and just pop in the oven for a couple of minutes before I use it.

 

Maybe not the best idea ever, but it works quite well for me...


  • Ann_T, FauxPas and Shel_B like this

I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...


#11 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,471 posts

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:46 AM

Dcarch, is there anything that you can't OVERcomplicate? lol

 

Me, I just bake loaves that I know will be used inside of 4-5 days. On those few occasions that I think it will mold before it is consumed, I freeze, then slice frozen, and just pop in the oven for a couple of minutes before I use it.

 

Maybe not the best idea ever, but it works quite well for me...

 

Yes, I do have a habit of "If it ain't broke, fix it anyway" LOL!

 

Actually I do the same as you when I just need a couple of slices for myself. This method is to revive a good size frozen loaf for dinner for a few people. Comes out almost like just freshly baked.

 

dcarch


  • FauxPas likes this

#12 tomh

tomh
  • participating member
  • 5 posts

Posted 07 March 2014 - 08:08 AM

Yes, I do have a habit of "If it ain't broke, fix it anyway" LOL!
 
Actually I do the same as you when I just need a couple of slices for myself. This method is to revive a good size frozen loaf for dinner for a few people. Comes out almost like just freshly baked.
 
dcarch


Must be an engineer :-)
  • FauxPas likes this

#13 Arey

Arey
  • participating member
  • 358 posts
  • Location:So. Jersey Shore

Posted 07 March 2014 - 09:31 AM

For my homemade large loaves of rye and hearth bread, and white and whole wheat pain de mie I wrap them in aluminum foil and then wrapped them in Glad Press and Seal.  When they got small enough I would use Glad 1 gal. twist tie bags which can be used for freezing.  I would also use them to freeze rolls when I bake rolls.   However, Glad has discontinued this product.  Can zipper type freezer bags work well? Can I  just cut the zipper off, and use the bag with a twist tie? I don't have the space in my above the fridge freezer for a 1 gal bag with one roll or a couple of slices of bread in it. Does anyone know of a suitable for freezing twist tie bag. I'm almost down  to my last box of Glad twist tie bags, and I had to order them from Amazon. 

An observation: When a favorite item disappears from supermarket shelves, and turns up on Amazon your favored item is being discontinued.


"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Bread