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Baking from "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza"

Bread Cookbook

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96 replies to this topic

#91 Anna N

Anna N
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Posted 29 June 2014 - 01:15 PM

Hi,
 
As a brand new baker, I'm trying to understand why all the recipes in this book are for two loaves?  (Other than that they're delicious.)  Is it that the ingredient amounts get too minute to measure?  We're a small household, and there's no way we'll go through the bread fast enough to avoid it going terribly stale.  Plus I want to bake more often, so that I have more chances to improve my technique before my memories of what worked last time are equally stale.  
 
I saw one person on this thread had halved the recipe to only make 1 loaf, but any advice you can offer on how to modify successfully would be hugely helpful.  
 
Thanks!


Most bread recipes are amenable to being halved or doubled. Simply divide the ingredients by 2. Rarely are any other changes needed.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#92 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:10 PM

Made a Forkish Pane de Campagne over here in the Cooking on a Big Green Egg thread.  



#93 Luke

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 02:53 PM

Another Ken Forkish convert. Started the Levain (from scatch) on Tuesday and followed it up with the Pain de Campagne on Sunday.

 

Levain was made with 40% whole wheat, 40% whole rye, 20% whole spelt ratios.

 

Awesome crumb and taste.

 

DSC05267 (Mobile).JPG

 

DSC05268 (Mobile).JPG

 

 


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#94 Anna N

Anna N
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Posted 24 August 2014 - 03:01 PM

Luke,

Congratulations. That is one beautiful looking bread! I must get back to Forkish.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#95 dr_justice

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 06:33 PM

Another convert here. Baked for the first time the overnight white on saturday morning, and my 3 year old was like "want more bread" all day long. I've never seen her want so much bread, ever.



#96 dr_justice

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:31 PM

By the way, has anyone tried  the bacon bread in Ken Forkish's book?   I don't have the time or work schedule to make levain, which is what it calls for in the book. Anybody tried to incorporate the bacon in the overnight white bread?

 

Speaking of the Overnight White Bread, my work schedule would command that I need to cut about 3 hours from the whole process -- basically I am thinking I would need to bulk ferment for 9 hours instead of the required 12-14 hours.

 

Any suggestions for how I could/should accelerate this process?  More yeast? Warmer water?



#97 dr_justice

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:17 PM

Space log E-2103.

 

Tried overnight white again.

 

Tried bread flour instead of AP, same brand, because I was out of AP.

Mixed in a tub as per Admiral Forkish's instruction (instead of a large concave bowl).

Reduced water temp 5 degrees to target 78 degrees (I was still off by a few).

Mistakenly baked at 450 for the first 30 minutes, at which point I remove the lid and go: "hey. Why the... Oh damn". Then bake for the the remaining 25 at 475.

 

The result of the experiment resulted in a thinner crust than anticipated.

As for the rest....

 

Oh.

 

Oh my.

 

Ooooooh. Moist. Flavorfoul. Perfect crumb texture.

 

Ooooooooooh.

 

Revelation.

 

Kirk out.


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