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Baking from "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza"

Bread Cookbook

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#91 Anna N

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 01:15 PM

Hi,
 
As a brand new baker, I'm trying to understand why all the recipes in this book are for two loaves?  (Other than that they're delicious.)  Is it that the ingredient amounts get too minute to measure?  We're a small household, and there's no way we'll go through the bread fast enough to avoid it going terribly stale.  Plus I want to bake more often, so that I have more chances to improve my technique before my memories of what worked last time are equally stale.  
 
I saw one person on this thread had halved the recipe to only make 1 loaf, but any advice you can offer on how to modify successfully would be hugely helpful.  
 
Thanks!


Most bread recipes are amenable to being halved or doubled. Simply divide the ingredients by 2. Rarely are any other changes needed.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
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#92 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:10 PM

Made a Forkish Pane de Campagne over here in the Cooking on a Big Green Egg thread.  



#93 Luke

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 02:53 PM

Another Ken Forkish convert. Started the Levain (from scatch) on Tuesday and followed it up with the Pain de Campagne on Sunday.

 

Levain was made with 40% whole wheat, 40% whole rye, 20% whole spelt ratios.

 

Awesome crumb and taste.

 

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DSC05268 (Mobile).JPG

 

 


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#94 Anna N

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 03:01 PM

Luke,

Congratulations. That is one beautiful looking bread! I must get back to Forkish.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
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#95 dr_justice

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 06:33 PM

Another convert here. Baked for the first time the overnight white on saturday morning, and my 3 year old was like "want more bread" all day long. I've never seen her want so much bread, ever.



#96 dr_justice

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:31 PM

By the way, has anyone tried  the bacon bread in Ken Forkish's book?   I don't have the time or work schedule to make levain, which is what it calls for in the book. Anybody tried to incorporate the bacon in the overnight white bread?

 

Speaking of the Overnight White Bread, my work schedule would command that I need to cut about 3 hours from the whole process -- basically I am thinking I would need to bulk ferment for 9 hours instead of the required 12-14 hours.

 

Any suggestions for how I could/should accelerate this process?  More yeast? Warmer water?



#97 dr_justice

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 05:17 PM

Space log E-2103.

 

Tried overnight white again.

 

Tried bread flour instead of AP, same brand, because I was out of AP.

Mixed in a tub as per Admiral Forkish's instruction (instead of a large concave bowl).

Reduced water temp 5 degrees to target 78 degrees (I was still off by a few).

Mistakenly baked at 450 for the first 30 minutes, at which point I remove the lid and go: "hey. Why the... Oh damn". Then bake for the the remaining 25 at 475.

 

The result of the experiment resulted in a thinner crust than anticipated.

As for the rest....

 

Oh.

 

Oh my.

 

Ooooooh. Moist. Flavorfoul. Perfect crumb texture.

 

Ooooooooooh.

 

Revelation.

 

Kirk out.


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#98 Luke

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:43 AM

Gave up on the idea of splitting the loafs into two dutch ovens 50/50 as I found it too time consuming, and I was a little concerned I'd be burning more electricity that I wanted too...

 

So, I dug out the good old camping dutch oven! Now this dutch oven is a monster, and normally used on our camp fire, but it can easily accomodate the whole loaf.

 

Baked the overnight white this time as my schedule would not allow a levain bread. Not bad. Could have left it a bit longer in the oven to brown up. It was a tad under-done in the center, but I put this down to changing to the larger/heavier dutch oven and changing the recipe as well. Note to self: dont change two variables at the same time! Actually, I think the issue was I used a pizza stone with this dutch oven like I did last time, but the cast iron is much thicker, so I will remove it next time.

 

Crust

ow1.jpeg

 

and crumb

ow2.jpeg

 

Now dont get me wrong, this is good bread! But was it better than the levain bread? Not even close. The flavour was somewhat bland (but so are a lot of bakery breads), but it was definitely enjoyable. If I was to make a non levain bread again, I would go for the wholemeal to add some extra flavour.

 

Cheers

Luke


Edited by Luke, 04 September 2014 - 07:45 AM.

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#99 janeer

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:00 PM

I too find the overnight white bland. I like the poolish better. Pretty loaf, though

#100 Luke

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 10:41 PM

Baked the Field Blend #2 yesterday in the large dutch oven. The baked loaf weighed in at 1.5kg!

 

Field Blend #2 is a different animal to the Pain de Campagne, no doubt due to the rye. After proofing in the fridge, it was more fragile and sticky when trying to get it in the dutch oven.

 

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The bake went really well....

 

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Crust was much darker, and I left it in the oven for quite some time.

 

 

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Crumb was a bit tighter as you would expect from a rye. The flavour is excellent, with some deep complex caramel/bitter overtones from the crust. This bread would go fantastically well with beer. But then again, it goes well with anything!

 

....Next experiment is see how Pain de Campagne works with plain flour (10.1% protein). Up until now, all of my white flour in these loafs has been Special White Tipo 00 (11.9% protein). Will let you know how I go....

 

Luke


Edited by Luke, 04 September 2014 - 10:41 PM.

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#101 Luke

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 09:31 PM

I have now settled (for the moment) on the Pain de Campagne as our standard loaf for baking during the week....

 

What I have been experiementing with is flour blends. I was originally using 100% Tipo 00 at 12.5% protein, and while the bread was awesome, the crumb was really chewey. Maybe a bit too chewey ...

 

Forkish recommends a flour between 11% and 12%.

 

So I made a few loaves blending the Tipo 00 with "Plain Flour" which in Australia is cake flour, a low gluten all purposes type flour, my plain flour was 10.5% protein.

 

I settled on blend ratio of 70% Tipo 00 @ 12.5% protein and 30% plain @ 10.5%, for the portion of white flour in the recipe.

 

A couple of observations:

   - Oven spring has increased by 25%. So much now that the loaf will hit the lid of the dutch oven and compress.

   - The crumb is noticably softer. It still has a nice chewy texture, but not the jaw breaking chew of before

   - The crumb cooks out a bit easier. By that I mean it doesn't seem to suffer from undercooking as the previous 100% Tipo 00 flour type did.

   - Taste is just as awesome, however I think my levain has changed its personality. This week our breads have had a more noticable sour twang, subtle but more notificable than before. We love it!

 

I will now scale the recipe down to 75% so the single (combined) loaf fits into the dutch oven with compressing on lid.

 

Cheers

Luke

 

crust.JPG

This is a really large loaf! I mean really really large! And that's a big banana for comparison!

 

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crumb.JPG


Edited by Luke, 09 September 2014 - 09:32 PM.

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#102 lesliec

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 09:35 PM

Nice, Luke.  The dancing goanna I see on top of the loaf in the first and second photos is a particularly thoughtful touch!


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#103 Anna N

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Posted 12 September 2014 - 12:48 PM

image.jpg

image.jpg

Half recipe of Saturday bread baked in a clay baker (Romertopf).
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog





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