Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Baking from "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza"

Bread Cookbook

  • Please log in to reply
102 replies to this topic

#31 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,417 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 14 February 2014 - 02:09 PM

image.jpg

This is the poolish-based harvest bread which contains wheat bran, wheat germ and whole wheat flour. It is flavourful without being stodgy.
  • judiu, MelissaH, Ann_T and 2 others like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#32 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 15 February 2014 - 12:10 PM

 

Field blend #2.  Additional whole wheat and pumpernickel flour.  


  • Okanagancook likes this

#33 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,417 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 15 February 2014 - 03:08 PM

image.jpg

Two unattractive baguettes. Forgot to fold the dough, had trouble shaping, the dough overflowed my borrowed forms, couldn't slash the very wet dough and yet they remain quite edible. Used the recipe for White Bread with Poolish.
  • judiu and rotuts like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#34 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:33 AM

IMG_1093.jpg

 

Bran-encrusted Levain Bread - sans bran!

 

I much prefer sesame seeds.  This loaf has white flour with a small amount of wheat germ. 

 

 


  • Okanagancook and rotuts like this

#35 chefmd

chefmd
  • participating member
  • 220 posts

Posted 16 February 2014 - 06:07 PM

1958015_10202152966804339_708295401_n.jpg

 

 

Saturday White Bread (on Sunday).  I only made one loaf, half recipe.  We do not need two loafs at a time.  Used water close to 95 degrees to allow for smaller volume. Final temperature was about 80 degrees instead of recommended 78.  

 

Now, the most important thing is not to eat the whole loaf in one sitting...


  • rotuts likes this

#36 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:30 AM

IMG_1094.jpg

 

Here's the crumb on the sesame-encrusted bread - this is one of the tastiest I've made so far!


  • DianaB and rotuts like this

#37 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:24 PM

I asked Anna which loaf I should try next - she suggested the Harvest Bread.  I had levain ready to go and the Harvest Bread uses poolish - so I just made a bastardized version of it.  It has all the same percentages as the poolish version but is a hybrid levain bread.

 

IMG_1096.jpg

 

The crust is more tender than previous loaves - I didn't have to work up a sweat cutting through the bottom crust.  

 

IMG_1098.jpg

 

Nice tender crumb. 

 

The fellows who were here blowing insulation in the attic each left with a huge buttered slab - they appeared quite happy!


  • demiglace and rotuts like this

#38 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,699 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:33 PM

Im stunned at how delicious these bread look.  i hope to get to it at some point.  Ill need a 'container' for my BV-XL etc.

 

has any one made a 'sourdough' of any flour composition ?

 

Ive had experience w SD's in the past and would be my 'preferred'  Index bread.

 

many thanks to all for this thread.



#39 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:37 PM

None of these are really sour - the one with rye flour came out more sour than my hubby cares for - I enjoyed it!



#40 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,699 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 February 2014 - 01:49 PM

Ill examine the book soon.  thanks



#41 Ann_T

Ann_T
  • participating member
  • 1,081 posts
  • Location:Cobble Hill

Posted 22 February 2014 - 08:54 AM

Rotuts, you can take just about any bread recipe and make it sourdough by adding a sourdough Biga or Levain to it in place of all or most of the yeast.

 

I'm on a sourdough kick at the moment so most of the breads I've been making are started with either a biga or a levain. 

 

~Ann



#42 chefmd

chefmd
  • participating member
  • 220 posts

Posted 22 February 2014 - 04:58 PM

Overnight white bread.

 

I need to buy whole grain flour to take this bread to the next level although it is pretty darn tasty as is.

 

 

 

Attached Images

  • IMG_0639.jpg


#43 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 February 2014 - 05:38 PM

Looks yummy!

 

Another bastardized loaf today - white and light rye using the hybrid formula, all in one day (no overnight rise).

 

IMG_1100.jpg

 

German salami sandwich for lunch tomorrow (or maybe breakfast).


Edited by Kerry Beal, 22 February 2014 - 05:46 PM.


#44 chefmd

chefmd
  • participating member
  • 220 posts

Posted 22 February 2014 - 05:50 PM

Did anyone try making black olive bread using Forkish method?  That is my favorite bread ever.  With nice high fat European butter and a glass of <insert beverage here>.



#45 teapot

teapot
  • participating member
  • 121 posts

Posted 22 February 2014 - 10:29 PM

Anyone ever baked with Einkorn?  It's a heritage grain (pre-dates wheat) that is being grown here in Washington. I'd never had it before but ground some berries in my spice grinder and used them in a Forkish-like levain bread (I followed technique but not formula). Crusted the loaf with bran.   I also made his pain de campagne and some cultured Jersey cream butter. It was really really good.

bran-encrusted Einkorn sd.JPG

 

Attached Images

  • Einkorn crumb.JPG
  • einkorn, butter, pain de campagne.JPG

  • Ann_T likes this

#46 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,417 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:49 AM

In terms of time and effort expended it's hard to beat the Saturday Bread for taste and texture.

image.jpg
  • Ann_T, Okanagancook and rotuts like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#47 teapot

teapot
  • participating member
  • 121 posts

Posted 23 February 2014 - 08:51 PM

Has anyone tried the Forkish technique for pizza? It involves using the broiler to blast the preheated stone with radiant heat from the broiler, and using the broiler to finish the baking.

My broiler is an 18,000 BTU infrared broiler so it got a little too hot as you can see in the photo. But in subsequent bakes, I dialed back the time in the oven (5 minutes total bake time was all that it took). Unfortunately, the good-looking pizza got gobbled up before I could take photos :)

Attached Images

  • forkish pizza.JPG

  • gfweb likes this

#48 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,626 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:25 AM

This is the same technique as the Modernist Cuisine folks, and I've been using it (with a baking steel) for months. Though it takes some adjusting to find that broiler sweet spot, if you take the time to heat up the stone/steel it works like a charm. 


Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#49 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:27 AM

Yeah - I haven't found the sweet spot yet.  If the snow has melted sufficiently that I can get to my Big Green Egg tomorrow - I'm going to rescue my stainless sheet and bring it inside to try.  I've not perfected it yet with the stone and the broiler.

 

But I've got pizza dough ready to go!



#50 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,626 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:43 AM

Try doubling the preheat time for your stone. I found that I was unknowingly leaving it in too long bc the stone wasn't fully heated, not that the broiler was too hot. Good luck: if you have the time and ability to preheat a good two hours, it's a revelation.


Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#51 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,214 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:52 AM

Has anyone tried the Forkish technique for pizza? It involves using the broiler to blast the preheated stone with radiant heat from the broiler, and using the broiler to finish the baking.

 

 

I've done it in 2006. Here



#52 teapot

teapot
  • participating member
  • 121 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:38 AM

This is the same technique as the Modernist Cuisine folks, and I've been using it (with a baking steel) for months.


Is it? I don't have the book but Modernist's online "How to make perfect pizza" article doesn't utilize the broiler. By the way, I didn't think their "perfect pizza" looked very appealing (this coming from the lady with the burnt crust:)). Like every other source I've read, they add the cheese at the beginning of the break. I find that cheese "breaks" into an oily indistinct mass if added too early.

#53 Ann_T

Ann_T
  • participating member
  • 1,081 posts
  • Location:Cobble Hill

Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:57 AM

Teapot, I have been using his method. Really happy with the way my pizzas are turning out.

 

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%


  • demiglace and teapot like this

#54 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,161 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 24 February 2014 - 02:09 PM

 

This is the same technique as the Modernist Cuisine folks, and I've been using it (with a baking steel) for months.


Is it? I don't have the book but Modernist's online "How to make perfect pizza" article doesn't utilize the broiler. By the way, I didn't think their "perfect pizza" looked very appealing (this coming from the lady with the burnt crust:)). Like every other source I've read, they add the cheese at the beginning of the break. I find that cheese "breaks" into an oily indistinct mass if added too early.

 

It is the technique from the original MC books, p 2•26–2•27. The trick though is to not just "put the stone as close to the broiler as possible", but rather to find your broiler's "sweet spot," which is a function of the spacing between the heating element's bars. For my oven it's actually the second setting from the top, for example.


  • teapot likes this

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#55 teapot

teapot
  • participating member
  • 121 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:52 PM

Yes, I think it was this lovely pizza that pointed me in the direction of Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast.  It's a beautiful pizza!   I wonder if you are using cooked or raw sausage? In my old way of cooking pizza, I used uncooked because it would cook in the 12 minutes needed for baking the pie.  But with just 5 minutes in the oven, I wonder if I'll need to precook the sausage. 

Teapot, I have been using his method. Really happy with the way my pizzas are turning out.

 

Pizza%20Sausage%20and%20Olive%20January%



#56 Ann_T

Ann_T
  • participating member
  • 1,081 posts
  • Location:Cobble Hill

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:44 PM

Teapot,  I saute the sausage first.  And if I'm adding mushrooms, they also get cooked.


  • teapot likes this

#57 AnneN

AnneN
  • society donor
  • 57 posts
  • Location:Long Island, New York

Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:47 AM

I am really enjoying this thread. I have been inspired to finish reading the book. My first attempt was the Saturday White Bread which came out great. Today, I'm making another Saturday bread but with a mix of whole wheat.


Anne Napolitano
Chef On Call


"Great cooking doesn't come from breaking with tradition but taking it in new directions-evolution rather that revolution." Heston Blumenthal

#58 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,417 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:00 PM

image.jpg

Saturday bread (which can apparently be made on Friday!). Purpose baked to sop up the sauce from Moules Provencale planned for this evening.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#59 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,868 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:23 PM

IMG_1103.jpg

 

Pain de campagne.



#60 chefmd

chefmd
  • participating member
  • 220 posts

Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:29 PM

Oh ah







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Bread, Cookbook