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Notter's orange raspberry chocolate

Chocolate Confections Dessert

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#1 curls

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:27 PM

Has anybody made the orange raspberry bon bon from Notter's book "The Art of the Chocolatier: From Classic Confections to Sensational Showpieces"?  It is described as a smooth raspberry coulis, atop a dark ganache, infused with fresh orange juice, encased in a dark chocolate shell. What did you think of it? I'm very curious about the texture and taste of the raspberry coulis. Unfortunately the book shows a picture on the finished piece (no step-by-step photos or a cut-away photo).



#2 Jim D.

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 07:27 AM

I have made it several times, and it has been a favorite of people who tasted it (including me).  As with many recipes, I have learned a few things from my experience:

 

The raspberry coulis recipe did not result in enough, at least for the molds I was using (rather large, deep ones to allow for the two layers).  I now use 1 1/2 times the amount listed for ingredients for the coulis.  In addition, when I followed the instructions to "boil for 3 minutes," I got raspberry rubber.  Now I cook it just until it starts to thicken a bit since it thickens a lot more as it cools.  Incidentally with the "raspberry rubber," I was able to thin it out with water so as to pipe it successfully.

 

As for the orange-dark chocolate ganache:  I found the proportion of chocolate to liquefier somewhat off.  The recipe calls for 165g orange juice (after being reduced) + 100g cream, but only 175g chocolate.  That's an approximate ratio of 1.5 parts liquefier to 1 part chocolate.  Even Notter himself states (p. 111) that the ratio should be 1:1 for a "soft ganache for molded pralines."  So that would mean 265g chocolate.  The first time I made this praline I followed the recipe as written, and the ganache never firmed up (it was OK because it was molded, but it was quite soft).

 

All that said, it is a delicious combination of flavors and textures.  In general, I have found that the recipes in Notter's book produce some of the most interesting, best tasting pralines (the yuzu-ginger is fantastic), but some of the quantities need tweaking (at least in my limited experience).

 

Jim


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#3 curls

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:53 PM

Jim D.  that you for all the helpful hints!  Two more questions for you... What type of pectin did you use for the raspberry coulis? What was the shelf-life for the chocolate?



#4 Jim D.

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 06:03 PM

I used what Chef Rubber calls "pectin pate de fruit," so it's not Shotts's special g-pectin or Pomona's pectin that requires calcium water.

 

I can't give you an exact shelf life since I am not making chocolates in a commercial situation but giving them away to friends and family.  I can say that there are probably two weeks between the time I make them and the time the last ones are given out.  I include a guide in each box saying they are best when eaten within a couple of weeks after receiving them and, if they are going to be kept longer than that, they should be refrigerated (on the theory than it's better to have a refrigerated chocolate than a killer chocolate).  I have kept some even longer than that for myself and they have been fine.  I always look for any signs of mold, etc., but have never seen any--though I must confess I am not sure what mold would look like in a ganache.  I assume you are in a commercial situation.  I don't think this item is any different from pate de fruit or a regular dark chocolate ganache filling.  Maybe I am too trusting, but I assume Notter's, Greweling's, and Wybauw's recipes provide adequate shelf life.


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