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"Sexier" name for chocolate covered nuts?


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#1 pastrygirl

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:14 PM

Can anyone think of a "sexier" name for chocolate covered nuts? Does 'enrobed nuts' sound fancier? Maybe something French or Italian? I don't think 'dragees' quite fits. Rochers?

#2 rotuts

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:24 PM

' bolas ' ?

 

or Bolas Asperos ?

 

ir just Asperos?


Edited by rotuts, 23 January 2014 - 04:29 PM.

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#3 dcarch

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:01 PM

Chocolnut?

 

Sexy names may totally confuse people.

 

 

dcarch


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#4 IowaDee

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:07 PM

chocojones.....?


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#5 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:09 PM

Nueces (almendras, pecanes, avellanas, toctes, etc.) Envueltos (enveloped) or Enrobados (clothed) or Recubiertos (covered) is one of the ways to go.  (Spanish).  And if they're dragee style, grageas is another term.

Noix (almendres, pecanes, noisettes, etc.) Enrobées  is another. (French)


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#6 Blether

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:13 PM

Chocojones, haha !

 

How about "Chef's salty chocolate balls" ?


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#7 Tri2Cook

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 05:57 PM

chocojones.....?

Winner! :biggrin:


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#8 pastrygirl

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:10 PM

Chocojones, haha !
 
How about "Chef's salty chocolate balls" ?


Chocojones is pretty clever! And while there are some people to whom I might describe them as my salty chocolate balls (and probably did last time I made them) that's not quite the feeling I'm going for... looking for something a few notches more upscale.

I'm getting some packaging made for chocolate bars, bonbons, truffles, caramels, pate de fruits, and chocolate covered nuts. To me the nuts sound awkward, so I was wondering if there was an established confectionery term for them that sounded better. I kind of like rochers, meaning rocks. Ciottoli, Italian for pebbles, would be apt, because they are more pebbles than rocks and it sounds cute, plus the name of my company is Italian, though the Italian thing is a pretty minimal influence. Oh, and something more vague to allow non-nut enrobed items would be a plus - the general term will be printed on the boxes, with room to write in more details.

Salted hazelnut rochers? Rosemary almond ciottoli? Candied olive enrobees?

And while we're at it, should it be pate or pates de fruits to describe a dozen pieces of the candy?

Thanks!

#9 curls

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:31 PM

I think you can go with dragée... that is the term that Grewling uses in his book for chocolate covered nuts.



#10 pastrygirl

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:11 PM

I think you can go with dragée... that is the term that Grewling uses in his book for chocolate covered nuts.


Thanks. I forgot to check Greweling while I was at work. Notter and Wybauw were inconclusive.

#11 Edward J

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:13 PM

A dragee is usually sugar coated. 

 

How about "Dinosaur eggs"?  "hazlenut(or almond or walnut) pearls"?



#12 pastrygirl

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:41 PM

A dragee is usually sugar coated.


That's why I wasn't sure about dragee. I do usually caramelize nuts before coating, but that might not count.

#13 Mjx

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:57 PM

Can you give some examples of things with the sort of name you have in mind (doesn't have to be chocolate, or even sweet, I'm just trying to get an idea of the sort of feel you're going for)? My first throught was 'Shove an umlaut in there, or an 'Å' or 'Ø', since most people think of Scandinavia as a source of high quality items'.


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#14 Blether

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:07 AM

Oh that kind of sexy  :wink:

 

This isn't a positive suggestion, but I'd be wary of "rocher".  I may be out of touch but AFAIK the only thing people will generally associate the word with is the Ferrero kind.  Unless you plan for your brand to be that big, you risk looking like a wannabe.  That, and as far as quality of the actual product goes, FR aren't any better than Toblerone.

 

Aren't you using some particularly special chocolate - from a single locale or a cachet source ?  You could have "Carenero Pecans" for example.  This covers the not-nut items, too..  What with nut allergies, you'll need to be clear somewhere about what the nuts are, right ?



#15 ChrisZ

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:59 AM

I had some fun with a thesaurus but everything else sounds pretentious.  

 

There aren't a lot of alternatives to the word 'nut' - online suggestions included 'nubbin', 'morsel', 'crux' and 'atom'.  Alternative words for 'covered' include "envelope", "sheathed", "swaddled" and "encompassed".

 

Assuming you stick with "chocolate", you get "chocolate swaddled atoms", or "chocolate enveloped nubbins".

 

Alternatively there's the French / Italian approach of calling something nut shaped a "noisette" or "nocciola".  Chocolate noisette sounds OK.

 

Blether beat me with the Southpark reference but this thread did remind me of my favourite Monty Python sketch.



#16 lebowits

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 06:03 AM

I've tried using "cute" names on some of my pieces which works only when the customer has some point of reference.  Examples of my pieces are "Heart of Darkness" & "Cherry Bomb".  Names in a language that people aren't familiar with generally confuse them.  Keep it simple.  I would stick with "chocolate covered <insert nut name>".


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#17 DianaM

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 09:44 AM

 
This isn't a positive suggestion, but I'd be wary of "rocher".  I may be out of touch but AFAIK the only thing people will generally associate the word with is the Ferrero kind.
 


Also, from what I know, "rocher" is a cluster of nuts or nut pieces (caramelized or not) and chocolate, and not individual(ly) coated pieces. The nuts are mixed into melted chocolate, and the resulting mass is then deposited in small mounds to set up. Greweling has a recipe for rochers and they're made this way.

Some people call them simply "pebbles," as an umbrella term to cover all sorts of things individually coated in chocolate, and having the appearance of small rocks.
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