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Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)


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#91 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 05:06 PM

Picking up where I left things off - more cocktails with Japanese whisky.

 

Talent Scout variation with Miyagikyo single malt Japanese whisky (10 years), dry curacao, Boker's bitters.

I had this one before with bourbon a bunch of times . Very different with the Miyagikyo, obviously. Quite intense, with lots of spice and smoke in the (dry) finish. The Pierre Ferrand dry curacao did not completely mesh with the fruit in the Miyagikyo.

 

11665160684_fcde9fbc92_z.jpg
 

Tattletale variation with Miyagikyo Japanese whisky, dogwood honey, Boker's bitters. This is based on a cocktail recipe that uses a mix of Highland and Islay scotch. The honey has a very distinctive flavor so this was really interesting. I liked it better than the Talent Scout.

 

11666283095_2be6327f3e_z.jpg
 


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#92 Hassouni

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:18 PM

Cocktail in a Glencairn glass, you say?



#93 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:41 PM

Cocktail in a Glencairn glass, you say?

Yes, I planned it this way. ;-)

#94 sbumgarner

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:30 AM

I've been enjoying taking drinks I've enjoyed at a bar and not necessarily trying to recreate them, but taking the flavor profile and making something of my own. Most of these experiments fail miserably or at best are decent but inspire nothing from the original. However this attempt, inspired by Death and Company's Cafe Sandinista, has been a pleasant surprise. They use rum (maybe aged, maybe not, can't remember), a coffee-and-chili-infused Campari, lime juice, and a few other things I've forgotten,  shaken and strained over crushed ice. This is what I came up with:

 

2 oz white rum (both 5 Banks and Cana Brava have worked well, something with a little funk seems to be good in this)

.75 oz lime

.5 simple (also tried .25 simple, .25 cinnamon syrup, not sure which I prefer)

.25 oz Campari

2 or 3 coffee beans

Healthy dash of Bittermens Habanero shrub

 

Muddle the coffee beans slightly, shake everything, double strain over a big rock. This has been working for me when I want something both refreshing but also complex enough to keep me from downing it in 5 mins :)



#95 Hassouni

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:02 AM

OK, bollocks to this, I've been sick for the better part of 2 weeks and need a drink!!


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#96 EvergreenDan

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:08 AM

Made a Shiver (Campari, Doug Fir, grapefruit) for the first time in a while. Even better than I remembered.


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#97 Ian Tuck

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 03:15 PM

Made a very simple drink the other day as part of a "customers make bartenders a drink" night at a local bar. We raised about $600 in tips for the Bartenders' Benevolent Fund here in Toronto.

 

Anyway, I call it the Panga. Appletons donated some bottles of Vx, so I started with the idea of a rum sidecar.

 

Once the base spirit was rum, I figured lime would work better than lemon as the citrus, and rather than Cointreau I decided to use Domaine de Canton to add the sweetness and because it had cognac in it I thought it was still in keeping with the idea of a sidecar. I still added 1/4 oz 1:1 simple to bump the sweetness a little.

 

When I tried it, it tasted good but seemed a little thin. That's when I went off the sidecar reservation. I added egg-white, which thickened it up, but it had a really quick finish. 4 drops of Bitterman's Elemakule Tiki bitters later I had a pretty dry, rum based islands-type drink. Quite a way from a sidecar, alas.

 

To name it, since it was an island-y drink, it got me to thinking about those zodiacs that often ferry people between larger boats and shore - when I was in Galapagos they called them "Pangas". So a Panga was sort of a sidecar to the boats.

 

At any rate, people seemed to like it - we went through a bottle and a half of Domaine de Canton. I tried it with both vanilla and cinnamon syrup and it seemed to work fairly well with both, but I went with just regular simple as that was what was on hand and I ran out of time.

 

Here's the recipe for a Panga:

1.5 oz Appleton's Vx

3/4 oz Domaine de Canton Ginger Liqueur

3/4 oz Lime Juice

1/4 oz Simple Syrup (1:1)

3/4 oz Egg White

4 drops Bitterman's Elemakule Tiki Bitters

 

Dry Shake, Wet Shake, serve in a 5 oz Coupe.

 

I googled the name and the recipe and found bupkus, but it would surprise me if someone hadn't already made something exactly or pretty-much exactly like it. That said, I came by the recipe honestly, so thought I'd post it here. I've thought about trying to modify it to use The King's Ginger, which would require a bit of balance-rejiggering because it's much more more ginger-y, but I think I'll just leave it as is.



#98 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:38 PM

The Panga looks good. It reminds me of another rum drink that I like, the Rum Crawl. Similar structure but instead of being all ginger, it's part ginger, part falernum. Very nice with Appleton (I use the 12 years).

 

How do you like the tiki bitters ?



#99 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:58 PM

My first experiment in 'barrel'-aging a cocktail. Equal parts Negroni (about 3/4 cup of each component plus a few dashes of Scrappy's/Regan's orange bitters) with 13 grams of barrel chips. 

 

barrelcocktail_zps266c7692.jpg


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#100 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 04:49 AM

Picking up where I left things off - more cocktails with Japanese whisky.

 

Talent Scout variation with Miyagikyo single malt Japanese whisky (10 years), dry curacao, Boker's bitters.

I had this one before with bourbon a bunch of times . Very different with the Miyagikyo, obviously. Quite intense, with lots of spice and smoke in the (dry) finish. The Pierre Ferrand dry curacao did not completely mesh with the fruit in the Miyagikyo.

 

11665160684_fcde9fbc92_z.jpg
 

Tattletale variation with Miyagikyo Japanese whisky, dogwood honey, Boker's bitters. This is based on a cocktail recipe that uses a mix of Highland and Islay scotch. The honey has a very distinctive flavor so this was really interesting. I liked it better than the Talent Scout.

 

11666283095_2be6327f3e_z.jpg
 

 

I just made the Talent Scout using Glenfarclas 15 in place of the Japanese whisky. It's okay. Drinkable but wouldn't make it again. I suspect the cocktail's dissatisfaction with itself, its internal struggle between whisky and curacao, isn't just something you find with Glenfarclas or the Japanese dram you used. Curacao and Scottish-style whisky--and I could Japanese whisky as mostly following in the Scottish tradition--merely tolerate each other.


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#101 Ian Tuck

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 07:47 AM

How do you like the tiki bitters ?

 

I liked them  a lot. It seemed fitting to use the Tiki ones as the flavour profile rapidly shifted as I modified (read: completely abandoned) the original sidecar idea. Since this is the first drink that I honestly would say I tried to come up with completely on my own (with the obvious h/t to the sidecar), I'd like a little more time to play with the flavours to see if I could take it somewhere else. I thought about floating some red wine on top a la a New York sour, but that just seems a little busy, and completely screws up the nice froth of the egg white. I should probably just leave well enough alone.



#102 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 02:01 PM

The Taketsuru Pure Malt (12 years) is quite mild with a somewhat sweet finish, so I used it in a very nice Old Fashioned with Boker's bitters and gomme syrup. The little packets of gomme they have in coffee shops in Japan came very handy for this one.

 

11705508355_741b27b777_z.jpg
 

A bit skimpy on the ice, but you should have seen the ice cube tray I was working with. Next time I travel, I will consider including a proper ice tray in my cocktail kit...

 



#103 Hassouni

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 02:05 PM

I know we have a whole thread on bitters, but how do the Boker's compare in an Old Fashioned to the more typical aromatic bitters?



#104 Rafa

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 02:27 PM

More assertive bitterness than Angostura, but milder flavors at similar volumes; a more floral and herbal flavor profile, with the components easier to distinguish than Ango, among them chamomile, coffee, gentian, and tons more.

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#105 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 02:59 PM

Are you in Japan at the moment, FrogPrincesse? Do you have access to many of these small bottles of Japanese whisky?


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#106 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:07 PM

Are you in Japan at the moment, FrogPrincesse? Do you have access to many of these small bottles of Japanese whisky?

Chris,

I am back (and slowly going through the backlog).

I wish I still had access to these little bottles, or the collection of large (and relativly cheap) ones at the airport, but that's no longer the case.



#107 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:08 PM

Damn. I'd have happily paid or organised an exchange of something impossible-to-get-outside-of-Australia for a box of assorteds. Japanese whisky is crrraaaazzzzy expensive in Australia.


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#108 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:24 PM

I hear you... We need to recruit Japanese cocktail nerds on eG.



#109 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:29 PM

I know we have a whole thread on bitters, but how do the Boker's compare in an Old Fashioned to the more typical aromatic bitters?

 

More assertive bitterness than Angostura, but milder flavors at similar volumes; a more floral and herbal flavor profile, with the components easier to distinguish than Ango, among them chamomile, coffee, gentian, and tons more.

 

The Boker's bitters have a base of cardamom and coffee, while Angostura has strong cinnamon notes. So even though the flavor profile is different, they are still close enough that they can be used in cocktails calling for Angostura or "aromatic bitters" in general.

 

My bottle has a dropper that delivers much more than an Angostura bottle, which compensates for the milder flavor if that's a concern (I haven't noticed it).

 

I prefer Boker's to Angostura in a Japanese Cocktail and also I think in a Martinez (haven't had one in a while). They make a great Manhattan too if you are looking for a slight change of pace.



#110 Hassouni

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:30 PM

I hear you... We need to recruit Japanese cocktail nerds on eG.

 

 

I don't know. From what I've seen, Japanese cocktails are mostly fruity and sweet and use blue curaçao.....


Edited by Hassouni, 24 January 2014 - 03:31 PM.


#111 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 03:38 PM

Yes, they are still very much into blue curaçao and piña coladas which is a little odd, but things are changing a bit.

 

This 2008 article from Bon Appetit proclaiming that Tokyo is the Cocktail Capital of the World is still pretty far from the truth...



#112 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 07:29 PM

My shipment from Small Hand Foods came in today, snow and all.  So tonight was...

 

...a Knickerbocker, Jerry Thomas, 1862 (Imbibe! pp 104-106).  I did not have the Santa Cruz rum called for, so my recipe was:

 

1 1/4 oz Appleton 12

3/4 oz W&N Overproof

juice of 1/2 lime (about 1 1/2 oz)

2 teaspoons Grand Marnier

2 teaspoons raspberry gum syrup

 

Shaken, strained over crushed ice.  Garnished with spent half lime and a lovely sprig of mint (recipe calls for spent half lime and fruits in season).  Very nice.  I don't understand why the Kickerbocker is not more popular.  It is a bit thinner in body than a mai tai, but O that raspberry.  Very subtile, but wow.

 

It is not my custom to enjoy more than one drink on a worknight.  However I just had to experiment:

 

1 oz Appleton 12

1 oz W&N Overproof

juice of 1/2 lime (about 1 1/2 oz)

2 teaspoons Grand Marnier

2 teaspoons raspberry gum syrup

2 teaspoons orgeat

 

 

Very nice!  I can't quite call it a mai tai.  Has anyone tried this combination and given it a name?  It is not perfect.  The lime is a little much and it is slightly too sweet, but the flavors are a delightful combination!

 

I plan to try:

 

2 oz rum

1 oz lime juice

1/4 oz Grand Marnier

1/4 oz raspberry gum syrup

1/4 oz orgeat

 

 

...but not tonight.



#113 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 07:40 PM

Acquired some St George dry rye gin. Looked to the official website for suggestions. Settled on the Hanky Pant: equal parts (1.5 oz) sweet vermouth (I used Punt e Mes) to gin plus a couple dashes of Fernet Branca. I thought that there would be too much vermouth but this is lovely. Have to get my hands on a larger bottle of this gin.

 

EDIT

 

The rye gin is a bit of a monster. I've seen it in various places compared to a genever. Now, maybe I haven't had enough genever--I've had the stone bottle Bols and the clear bottle stuff--but I don't know about that. I mean, yeah, it's got more in common with a genever than it does with, say, a London Dry, but there's something very robust about it. I mean, genever has that fuck-you-maltiness--it's no wallflower--but this is something else. I really like it. Might even be my new favourite gin. Bye, West Winds Cutlass. 


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 24 January 2014 - 07:55 PM.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#114 EvergreenDan

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:37 PM

I mean, genever has that fuck-you-maltiness


Most people swear by their ingredients. Chris's ingredient's swear at him.  :raz:


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#115 haresfur

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:43 PM

My shipment from Small Hand Foods came in today, snow and all.  So tonight was...

 

...a Knickerbocker, Jerry Thomas, 1862 (Imbibe! pp 104-106).  I did not have the Santa Cruz rum called for, so my recipe was:

 

1 1/4 oz Appleton 12

3/4 oz W&N Overproof

juice of 1/2 lime (about 1 1/2 oz)

2 teaspoons Grand Marnier

2 teaspoons raspberry gum syrup

 

Shaken, strained over crushed ice.  Garnished with spent half lime and a lovely sprig of mint (recipe calls for spent half lime and fruits in season).  Very nice.  I don't understand why the Kickerbocker is not more popular.  It is a bit thinner in body than a mai tai, but O that raspberry.  Very subtile, but wow.

 

 

I do like a knickerbocker, speaking of which, it's Australia Day tomorrow and Inner Circle works well. But I've found that it is easy for the raspberry to dominate and I cut it back.  In Imbibe, Dave Wondrich says, "the Knickerbocker is the spiritual progenitor of the Tiki drink.  Think of it as an 1850s Mai Tai."


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#116 Czequershuus

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 09:30 PM

Sometimes a cocktail name just draws me as much as the ingredients - 

 

Growing Old and Dying Happy is a Hope, Not an Inevitability (by Maks Pazuniak)

         2 Oz Cynar

         1 Oz Rye Whiskey

         1 pn Salt

         2 Pieces Lemon Peel

         Herbsaint/Asinthe Rinse

Stir first three ingredients without ice. Add one piece of lemon peel and ice and stir. Strain into an asinthe rinsed glass. Garnish with other lemon peel.

 

Excellent cocktail. As my first foray into salt in cocktails, I would say there is a small but noticeable change in bitterness. The cocktail tastes mostly of the Cynar, but bolstered by the rye. The Absinthe rinse harmonizes is a cool way with the sweet, herbal Cynar, and contributes the aroma along with the lemon. An extremely well constructed cocktail, I am beginning to see a pattern in liking Pazuniak's cocktails; The Last Mechanical Art and The Arbitrary Nature of Time are already some of my favorites. 



#117 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 09:56 PM

I like it too.
What brands of rye and absinthe/herbsaint did you use?

#118 Czequershuus

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 10:35 PM

I like it too.
What brands of rye and absinthe/herbsaint did you use?

Rittenhouse for the Rye, Kubler for the Absinthe. And I did my rinse with an aromatizer. 



#119 Ian Tuck

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 09:29 AM

juice of 1/2 lime (about 1 1/2 oz) 

 

Man, I want to be where you are. I only ever get about 3/4 oz of lime juice from a half a lime, with either a hand press or a big lever press. I guess I should count myself as lucky that we're able to get any citrus way up here in the frozen tundra of Canada.


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#120 bostonapothecary

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 05:00 PM

.5 oz. perique aromatized whitened whiskey (mellowed for one year)

.5 oz. old forester 100

1 oz.  overproof overholt (55%)

1 oz. martini rossi gran lusso

dash angostura

 

impatiently I made this like a meritage where you cannot really attribute what to what, but it is quite delicious. I found the tobacco aromatized whiskey in a cabinet after not being happy with it and forgetting about it over a year ago. I guess you cannot really rule these things out until at least a year later. the aroma has really come into its own and it finally resembles the potent Louisiana tobacco from which it was abstracted. I suspect it should be redone with an acid catalyst and longer time under heat now that it shows a little promise. maybe I can come up with a drink I really like and name it after the St. James Parish.


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