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Drinks! 2014 (Part 1)


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#61 Rafa

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:30 PM

Knob Creek is good stuff. It's a Jim Beam rye, the same stuff as Old Overholt, ri(1), and the eponymous label, though at a higher proof and presumably older. I like it, and it's better suited to sipping than Rittenhouse or Bulleit, but I strongly prefer Rittenhouse in most mixed drinks. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#62 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 02:18 AM

Mixed some Bernheim wheat whiskey with some iced chai that I made. Squeezed in a bit of lemon juice just because. This works.


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#63 haresfur

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 02:29 AM

Gi' Punch

 

Seneca Drums Gin

small puddle cane syrup

coin of lime

1 ice cube

 

Really nice.  This is a sipping gin.


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#64 Rafa

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:16 PM

Still playing around with sherry, and with a bottle of Lustau manzanilla open, I opted tonight for the Choke Artist from Art of the Bar. Maybe it's just me, but I think this is one of the perfect drinks. The synergy that exists between sherry and Cynar always blows my mind.

Here's a couple for you: The New Hickory (Cynar, Manzanilla, grapefruit and burlesque bitters), and my Old Spanish (Cynar, Manzanilla, raspberry syrup, tonic). 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#65 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 04:41 PM

Rafa, you're like a thirsty person's fairy godmother. :smile:


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 16 January 2014 - 04:42 PM.

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#66 EvergreenDan

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:31 AM

A Last Word using clear bottle Bols Genever. Rocking.

Thanks for the idea. I found the genever a touch subtle in this drink, and I bumped it up 1/4 oz plus used Leopold Maraschino. Next time I think I'll try 3:1:1:1 or 4:2:2:1 (with 1 being the Chartreuse). Worth revisiting.

 

I wonder if Tammany Hall would work with Punt e Mes...


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#67 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 11:48 AM

I curtailed a hard day's doing nothing much to take myself out to Happiness Forgets last night; here is the proof.

 

Bonnie Prince

Bailie Nicol Jarvie scotch, PX, Punt e Mes, Absinthe, Jerry Thomas Bitters and citric acid
001 (480x640).jpg

 

I really liked this drink, which I guess is an elaboration of a Robert Burns. Although they produce a very harmonious result the various elements remain distinct and it's possible to appreciate each part.

 

Dante

Tapatio Reposado, Kummel, Chartreuse, lime, cane syrup, basil, celery bitters

003 (480x640).jpg

 

As a herbivore I will never spurn a bit of greenery and I was interested in the use of basil here, but in fact I did not really enjoy this one, which I found sweet and sticky. Perhaps that's what cane syrup will do. The tequila was also extremely restrained and I thought it could have been more prominent for an improved balance, but I did like the big bits of plant matter and shards of ice. I spoke to my neighbour about this choice and she expressed a totally opposite opinion.

 

Perfect Manhattan

004 (480x640).jpg

 

The couple sitting by me worked for Pernod-Ricard and Havana Club and were spending a busman's holiday in the bar. I reckoned they knew whereof they spoke and since they told me it was their favourite place in London I picked their brains about what to order; this was Mamie's recommendation and she liked either it or me so much she bought me one. What a sweetheart.

 

At this point I became engaged in an involved conversation with a cage-fighting entrepreneur, so I didn't take any more pictures. I ordered the house Negroni. I was very, er, interested in my discussion and that caused me to forget some important details like what was in it and what it was called. The Count seems plausible. Anyway, the bitter side is quite attenuated by some additional ingredient and it's a very pleasant variant.

 

Happiness Forgets is super relaxed and friendly. The music is cool. The bartenders and hostess are very, very pretty. I can only criticise the unlikely orientation of the bathrooms, which open directly onto the bar ( :huh:). That struck me as a trifle indiscreet. I just prefer not to look at toilets. The bar menu is quite short but there's a proper range of options and the offering changes frequently so you won't get bored even if you go there all by yourself with a vague intention to do some reading over a quick drink and end up staying for five hours and being politely encouraged to go elsewhere because everyone who works there would like to leave soon... Julian who was serving my sector of the bar first came there on an exchange from the Goldene Bar in Munich and would not go home at the end, so it seems people like working as well as drinking there.

 

Well they would not allow me to stay any longer so I was forced back home to meet a friend. We resumed by leaping onto the Tammany Hall bandwagon. My guest said 'Oh God' with feeling when he tasted it and I could tell he meant it as he drank several. Thank you. Rafa :smile:

 

To conclude we made a couple of Sazeracs, and post a brief but necessary snooze, a cold shower and some jolt coffees it was work time. For my friend. :biggrin:

 


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#68 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:06 PM

Gah, I posted that in the wrong thread. Perhaps I am not as astute as I normally am. Hopefully it can be moved.

It will just stay here so the embarrassment is complete. :-)

 

Very nice summary. Seems like an interesting clientele too.

 

At this point I became engaged in an involved conversation with a cage-fighting entrepreneur, so I didn't take any more pictures. I ordered the house Negroni. I was very, er, interested in my discussion and that caused me to forget some important details like what was in it and what it was called. The Count seems plausible. Anyway, the bitter side is quite attenuated by some additional ingredient and it's a very pleasant variant.

 

Could it be the Harry Palmer? Or was it gin-based?



#69 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 01:47 PM

 


It will just stay here so the embarrassment is complete. :-)

 

 

Fortunately I have long practiced sublimating my humiliations and transmuting them into neurosis, so this type of error barely registers on my self-esteem-o-graph now  :biggrin: 
 

 

Could it be the Harry Palmer? Or was it gin-based?

 

 

No, pretty sure it was a standard Negroni formulation, plus somethingorother that I can't remember. Guess I'll have to go back and check. Oh well.


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#70 judiu

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 07:25 PM

IIRC, Knob Creek 100 is smooth and sneaky! And damn tasty!
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#71 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 11:25 PM

IIRC, Knob Creek 100 is smooth and sneaky! And damn tasty!

 

Is that the rye or one of the Knob Creek bourbons?



#72 lesliec

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:16 AM

 
I wonder if Tammany Hall would work with Punt e Mes...


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#73 haresfur

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 03:08 AM

Archangel with Hendricks gin

 

I've been making a similar drink with Beefeater, Aperol, and cardamom bitters.  The Arch is much mellower without the juniper bite, a nice change.


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#74 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:44 PM

I almost started a thread "What didn't you buy at the liquor store today?"  I had been broke but I got paid yesterday.  Unfortunately when I got there the shelves were somewhat bare.  I had a feeling this was not going to be a good experience when I saw the spot where Cointreau wasn't.  (Yes, they did have tiny bottles.)

 

Pusser's?  "Delivery didn't come."

 

Old Grand Dad 114?  "Sold out."

 

Dickel's Rye"  "Sorry, don't carry it."

 

As for rye, there were several choices:  my fallback, I had told myself, was Rittenhouse.  But I balked at $27 on the bottom shelf, particularly when the Heaven Hill bourbon next to it was in the single digits.  (Not to mention last night my son cautioned me against anything from Heaven Hill.)  I looked at the Knob Creek and Woodford a long time.  But what I took home was McKenzie.  A glass of which I just finished -- to gain some first impressions before mixing up my whiskey punch.

 

All the taste descriptions now make sense.  Thank you.  The McKenzie was a little sweeter than I expected, but I like the spirit and I like the spicyness.  Not rough at all.  I had been worried that rye would taste tannic the way Mount Gay Black Barrel rum does.  No tannic taste in McKenzie's at least.  I can't yet speak for other rye.  Am I the only one who finds Black Barrel horridly tannic?

 

Since I'm sure everyone is wondering I got Grand Marnier in place of Cointreau.  One can do worse than Grand Marnier for a Curacao.  And for rum I restocked W&N.  A girl can get pretty far on a bottle of W&N.



#75 EvergreenDan

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 07:22 PM

Do you live near Watkins Glen, NY, where Finger Lakes Distilling is? I had their McKenzie rye. It is much stronger in rye flavor than any other rye I've had. If you like it neat, then you really like rye. I have recently seen their bourbon in Boston.

 

They make a ton of different things. Fun place to visit for a tasting, too.


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#76 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 08:42 PM

I live in central NJ.  My local store has McKenzie's bourbon and they used to have their rye -- I have the last bottle.  I assume the store will restock it.  I should have mentioned the delightful scent left in the glass.  Maybe it's genetic, I was born near Rye, NY.

 

As to use in mixed drinks, I must say the whiskey punch I'm having now is pretty good (Imbibe! p76).  True, not all the McKenzie character cuts through the rum and lemon juice.  But enough.  (After all, there are three ounces of it.)  I like McKenzie better than Black Barrel in the recipe if only because my mouth doesn't feel like I am sucking on a block of alum.

 

Has anyone had McKenzie bourbon?  Would it be worth trying?



#77 haresfur

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:55 PM

I live in central NJ.  My local store has McKenzie's bourbon and they used to have their rye -- I have the last bottle.  I assume the store will restock it.  I should have mentioned the delightful scent left in the glass.  Maybe it's genetic, I was born near Rye, NY.

 

As to use in mixed drinks, I must say the whiskey punch I'm having now is pretty good (Imbibe! p76).  True, not all the McKenzie character cuts through the rum and lemon juice.  But enough.  (After all, there are three ounces of it.)  I like McKenzie better than Black Barrel in the recipe if only because my mouth doesn't feel like I am sucking on a block of alum.

 

Has anyone had McKenzie bourbon?  Would it be worth trying?

 

I tasted the McKenzie bourbon and it was nice enough but I'm not sure it would be up with my favourites.  I bought the rye and it is decent for sipping but I haven't had much success mixing with it.  Something about the funk doesn't work so well for me. YMMV 

 

ETA if I could get Rittenhouse for $27 I would be happy indeed.


Edited by haresfur, 18 January 2014 - 11:56 PM.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#78 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 12:27 AM

A Bitter Elder modified as per EvergreenDan's sage advice: a 2 bitter to 1 boozy junipery booze to .75 citrus to .5 elderflower deal.

 

2 oz Campari

1 oz Botanist

.75 oz lime

.5 oz St Germain

 

Shaken. Up. Pretty fucking good, Dan. I like that it looks and smells like a girly drink.


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 19 January 2014 - 12:27 AM.

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#79 tanstaafl2

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:45 AM

I live in central NJ.  My local store has McKenzie's bourbon and they used to have their rye -- I have the last bottle.  I assume the store will restock it.  I should have mentioned the delightful scent left in the glass.  Maybe it's genetic, I was born near Rye, NY.
 
As to use in mixed drinks, I must say the whiskey punch I'm having now is pretty good (Imbibe! p76).  True, not all the McKenzie character cuts through the rum and lemon juice.  But enough.  (After all, there are three ounces of it.)  I like McKenzie better than Black Barrel in the recipe if only because my mouth doesn't feel like I am sucking on a block of alum.
 
Has anyone had McKenzie bourbon?  Would it be worth trying?


Had a chance to try three different McKenzie whiskies recently.

Mckenzie whiskey.JPG

The rye was the favorite for me. About 3 years old and aged in barrels that are air seasoned for 36 months before being finished briefly in barrels that had contained locally made sherry allowed it to have a nice rye grain nose but a more rounded palate than one might have expected for its age while retaining a solid rye spiciness.

The bourbon was also good although I hope they will continue to let it age a bit more as I think it has great potential.

Everything used to be made in pot stills but they have since converted to a column still which they feel allows them to produce an even better product although it will take some for it to age before it will be released.

I definitely think they are a distillery to watch in the near future. They don't rush things and are trying to do it in what I would consider the right way with full size barrels and a decent amount of aging as well as trying some different touches like the sherry finish on the rye.

Hard part for me as that there is only so much so distribution is limited. Not available locally so I have to order it online currently.
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If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
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#80 Rafa

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:08 AM

How's the Irish-style whiskey? If I remember correctly it's made with both malted and unmalted barley and a bit of oats, which piques my interest.


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#81 tanstaafl2

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:15 AM

Dinner out last night to try Kimball House for the first time. Packed on a Saturday and the bartenders didn't have a spare second to chat which I always enjoy doing when I can.

Ended up with three different cocktails but forgot my phone so no pictures to be had. Also no opportunity to see if they would share the recipes.

One was a Johnnys Hideaway. Presumably an homage to an older Atlanta cocktail bar/dance club generally featuring 50's and 60's music to the best of my knowledge.
james e. pepper rye
cocchi barolo chinato
punt e mes
amaro sibilla
pickled peach
bitters

Quite dry but tasty.

Next was a Death & Company. Presumably named after the New York bar of the same name although Company was spelled out rather than abbreviated.
j.w. dant bonded bourbon
spiced honey
lemon
la muse verte absinthe
green chartreuse
angostura bitters

Had a couple of these. Very good but very dependent on the absinthe rinse. The second one seemed to have a touch too much and of course the absinthe can quickly dominant.

But the "sleeper" of the night was the Sleep Walk.
scarlet ibis trinidad rum
capano antica formula
chichicapa mezcal
tart cherry brandy
aromatic cola bitters

Really, really good! Although the use of Scarlet Ibis made me think of Death & Co. again since they created the original blend for this rum brand.
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If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#82 tanstaafl2

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:23 AM

How's the Irish-style whiskey? If I remember correctly it's made with both malted and unmalted barley and a bit of oats, which piques my interest.


It was my least favorite which was a bit disappointing. It is a pure or single pot still style made with malted and unmalted barley (80% barley, 15% malt and 5% oats) and aged about 4 years. I compared it against the new Emerald 1865 Irish style whiskey from Ransom. It is a bit different with 67% malt, 7% barley, 12% oats and the addition of 15% rye which the McKenzie doesn't have. It is a bit younger at three years.

The Emerald was the better whiskey to me. I think it is a really nice whiskey that doesn't seem to know it is only 3 years old. Also the mashbill is closer to my recollection of typical single pot still whiskey like Redbreast being made today with a 2/3 malted, 1/3 unmalted mashbill. I think the oats add something unique that may contribute to the richness of this otherwise relatively young whiskey. I highly recommend it if you can find it. It is rather spendy though.

The McKenzie was all barley on the nose to me (not a bad thing) and retained a lot of grain on the palate. A bit more coarse then the Emerald which had a real richness and oily mouthfeel that was somewhat unexpected in such a young whiskey. I like it more every time I try it and have acquired several bottles.

Emerald.JPG
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If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#83 Rafa

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 09:44 AM

Thanks for the notes. I'm excited for the Ransom whiskey, especially given your description of its mouthfeel and apparent maturity. I'll try it at a bar before I invest in a full bottle though.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#84 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:02 PM

Oh, the Sullivan's double. That's the one I'e had/own a 200mL mini of. Keen to hear your thoughts on it. I think it's forgettable. 


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#85 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 04:29 PM

One note to add on the McKenzie's:  it's a bit hard on the head the next afternoon.


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#86 judiu

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 06:29 PM

JNW, the Knob Creek was the 100° proof bourbon.
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#87 KD1191

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 08:36 PM

Needed mint for a recipe and had quite a bit left over, so I made a couple of my minty favorites and pretended it was a scorcher outside:

 

The Wry Grin (a Sam Ross modern classic)...not sure of the original ratios, but I took inspiration from here and made mine as follows:

 

2 oz Rye (Willett 4yr for that slightly minty note found in the high-Rye mashbills)

1/2 oz Fernet (Fernet Leopold, here, which was terrific)

1/2 oz Simple

1/2 a lemon, quartered

10 mint leaves

 

Everything got muddled a bit (though I tried not to beat up on the mint too badly), then shaken with ice and strained onto fresh ice with a healthy, spanked mint garnish.

 

WryGrin.jpg

 

After that was a classic Mint Julep. I used Ancient Ancient Age 10 Year, and the only liberty I took was a few drops of Bittercube's Jamaican Bitters #2 on the leaves of the garnish, a trick I picked up from Stephen Cole (The Barrelhouse Flat & Lone Wolf). The spiciness adds a delightful counterpoint...allspice dram works nicely, too.

 

Julep.jpg


Edited by KD1191, 19 January 2014 - 08:37 PM.

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#88 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 03:46 AM

A Flor de Cana 4-powered Hemingway Daiquiri. Lovely drink. I mistrust anyone that feels the need to add simple to this. 


EDIT

 

And now an Arbitrary Nature of Time from beta cocktails. I used Elmer Lee in place of Wild Turkey as it is the booziest bourbon I have on hand.


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 20 January 2014 - 04:27 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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#89 tanstaafl2

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 10:31 AM

Oh, the Sullivan's double. That's the one I'e had/own a 200mL mini of. Keen to hear your thoughts on it. I think it's forgettable.


Have tasted it but not opened that particular bottle and spent anytime with it. It just happened to be bought around the same time as the Emerald and so was in the same picture!

My samples were enough to get me to buy it but I do recall it was a bit thin at the lower proof. The French Oak was perhaps a bit more spicy with a little more proof but also more costly.

Edited by tanstaafl2, 20 January 2014 - 10:32 AM.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#90 tanstaafl2

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Posted 20 January 2014 - 10:35 AM

Thanks for the notes. I'm excited for the Ransom whiskey, especially given your description of its mouthfeel and apparent maturity. I'll try it at a bar before I invest in a full bottle though.


Will be interested to hear your thoughts once you have tried it. I really like it but recognize every palate is different!
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2