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Dinner! 2014 (Part 1)


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#1 liuzhou

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 10:34 PM

Last night.

 

chicken and chestnuts3.jpg

 

Braised chicken with chestnuts. 板栗烧鸡.

 

Adapted from a Fuchsia Dunlop recipe. It was served with stir fried baby bok choy and rice.

 

chicken and chestnuts1.jpg


Edited by liuzhou, 04 January 2014 - 10:35 PM.

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#2 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 12:20 AM

Brisket and lightly grilled vegetables. The brisket was cooked using my go-to method but I was dissatisfied with it. My brisket came from another source. I guess it serves me right for being disloyal. The one time I wish I'd bothered making Meathead's mop sauce. Other times, the brisket has been juicy enough that any kind of additional liquid is excess for the sake of excess. Having no option but whatever was in my fridge, I ended up serving a little bit of the Modernist Cuisine mushroom ketchup on the side. Someone from Texas will now probably shoot me.

 

The vegetables were more successful: baby dutch creams (pre-boiled), corn (given a brief stint in the microwave prior to hitting the grill), Dutch carrots, spring onions and red capsicum. I scattered some wood chips (a blend of mesquite, apple wood and cherry wood) over the coals before cooking the vegetables. They were served with the remoulade from John Currence's Pickles, Pigs and Whisky.

 

DSC_0039_zps4c9e3f80.jpg


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 05 January 2014 - 12:21 AM.

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#3 Robenco15

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 12:56 AM

TK's Boeuf Bourguignon with what was available in the fridge. Have been snowed in the past two days.

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  • image.jpg

Edited by Robenco15, 05 January 2014 - 12:57 AM.

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#4 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 02:17 AM

Is this his one from Bouchon or his wacky sous vide one? Judging by the classic presentation I assume it's the former. How do you rate his recipe compared to, say, Bourdain's?


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 05 January 2014 - 02:17 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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#5 Ann_T

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:42 AM

Dinner last night was pork tenderloin seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic and fresh rosemary.

 

Proscuitto%20wrapped%20Pork%20Tenderloin

and wrapped in prosciutto.  The meat was seasoned and wrapped in the morning and roasted when I got home from work.

 

Proscuitto%20wrapped%20Pork%20Tenderloin

Served with steamed and buttered vegetables and roasted potatoes.


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#6 boudin noir

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:52 AM

No pictures, but slow braised veal neck with garlic, sage and white wine. Veal neck is really great!
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#7 liuzhou

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 08:13 AM

Ann_T Your tenderloin has me drooling over the keyboard.


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#8 Robenco15

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 10:10 AM

Is this his one from Bouchon or his wacky sous vide one? Judging by the classic presentation I assume it's the former. How do you rate his recipe compared to, say, Bourdain's?

 

Bouchon. I haven't had Bourdain's, but I loved this one. I also didn't have all of the ingredients because of the snow storm. These included, short ribs (used chuck roast instead), pearl onions, garlic, and thyme. I also used More Than Gourmet beef stock, but obviously I would have preferred making my own. Not possible unfortunately. I probably was missing other stuff too. That being said, that fact that it came out as well as it did and how much I enjoyed it speaks to how good the recipe is. Really enjoyed making the wine reduction and doing the cheesecloth nest for the beef and refrigerating it for 24 hours and doing the garnishes separately.

 

The only curious step was that I thought it was common practice to flour the beef before searing, but that didn't seemed to be called for here.

 

Great recipe though. Can't wait to go back and do again with everything part of the recipe, including homemade stock.


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#9 patrickamory

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 10:18 AM

Made a Thai meal at friends' house. Curry pastes pounded at home first!

 

Som tum two ways - one with salted crab (you can eat them like potato chips), one without, and jungle curry of chicken.

 

thai_prep.jpg

 

som_tum.jpg

 

sum_tum_crab.jpg

 

jungle_curry.jpg


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#10 Paul Bacino

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:51 AM

Just a day of Meatless-ness!!

 

RT help me   :wacko:

 

Roasted Beets  with Feta and Beet Vinaigrette

 

11781064233_e62e2f122d_k.jpg

 

 

 


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#11 rotuts

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:55 AM

wow.  No Meat.  looks tasty though.  Pointy-Headed Beets !

 

( you could sneak over to BK and take a few hits for the team w the BigKing  ( 2 / 5 bucks )  suggest a Wig and Big Dark Glasses )

 

Im sure you've got 'plans' to make up for this in the coming days.  " training ' its called.


Edited by rotuts, 05 January 2014 - 11:56 AM.


#12 kayb

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 05:14 PM

Tonight: rouladen, navy beans and ham, potato skins. No photos; we were all starving and fell into it before I thought to take a pic. Chocolate cobbler with butter pecan ice cream for dessert.


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#13 scubadoo97

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 06:44 PM

Ann_T Your tenderloin has me drooling over the keyboard.


Excellent looking tenderloin Ann
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#14 Franci

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:18 PM

Tonight we had a bit of stuffed focaccia pugliese, now I'm craving the onion focaccia


image.jpg

Gnocchi al ragu'

image.jpg

And a small piece of SV sirloin ( a little mushy) with collards

image.jpg

And for the Epiphany (tomorrow), la befana, I made some charcoal.

image.jpg
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#15 robirdstx

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 07:22 PM

image.jpg

Apricot-Ginger Pork Tenderloin Medallions and Asparagus
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#16 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 01:26 AM

My take on pasta con sarde. I started, a while ago, with the recipe in Zak Pelaccio's Eat With Your Hands and over time I've modified it enough that I guess I can call it my own. I use good quality canned sardines in place of fresh ones. I use ~250g roughly chopped cherry tomatoes in place of the two chopped tomatoes Pelaccio calls for. The sofrito contains some diced fennel bulb and a shallot in addition to the garlic and anchovy fillets (Ortiz) he calls for. I keep the Pernod-soaked raisins (the Pernod, which he says you can drink if you're feeling frisky, is pictured in the background) and pine nuts whole rather than chopping them. Finally, I leave out the fennel pollen. It's hard to get and really quite expensive. I've even stopped bothering adding in a few toasted and chopped fennel seeds like I used to: I find the leafy bits and diced fennel bulb and pastis give me enough of a fennel/aniseed kick.

 

DSC_0007_zpsd8fbe1c8.jpg


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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#17 Anna N

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:01 AM

image.jpg

Chicken leg confit with sauteed portobello mushroom and zucchini ribbons. (Drumstick and thigh parted company as I removed the chicken from the SV bag.).
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#18 basquecook

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 01:22 PM

Beautiful meals all.. Franci, can you talk about the charcoal you made?   


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#19 teajay

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 04:26 PM

 

Is this his one from Bouchon or his wacky sous vide one? Judging by the classic presentation I assume it's the former. How do you rate his recipe compared to, say, Bourdain's?

 

Bouchon. I haven't had Bourdain's, but I loved this one. I also didn't have all of the ingredients because of the snow storm. These included, short ribs (used chuck roast instead), pearl onions, garlic, and thyme. I also used More Than Gourmet beef stock, but obviously I would have preferred making my own. Not possible unfortunately. I probably was missing other stuff too. That being said, that fact that it came out as well as it did and how much I enjoyed it speaks to how good the recipe is. Really enjoyed making the wine reduction and doing the cheesecloth nest for the beef and refrigerating it for 24 hours and doing the garnishes separately.

 

The only curious step was that I thought it was common practice to flour the beef before searing, but that didn't seemed to be called for here.

 

Great recipe though. Can't wait to go back and do again with everything part of the recipe, including homemade stock.

 

 

 

I made this twice in December - first time to familiarize myself with it, second time for family on Christmas Eve. Also love making the garnishes & will cook carrots / potatoes this way more often. Definitely make the veal stock though. I used homemade beef stock for the second one (veal bones weren't available where I was traveling) and the difference was noticeable. 


Edited by teajay, 07 January 2014 - 04:27 PM.


#20 Anna N

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 05:13 PM

image.jpg

Last night. Shrimp with zucchini and yellow squash ribbon stir-fry dressed with some miso butter.

image.jpg

Tonight. Onion and cabbage sauteed in schmaltz and topped with picanha.
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#21 Franci

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:30 PM

Beautiful meals all.. Franci, can you talk about the charcoal you made?


I mixed 130 g 10X sugar with 2 tablespoons egg whites, some drops of lemon juice (which maybe was a mistake affecting my color), 2 tablespoons vodka (to make it porous) and some black food color. I made a light caramel with 500 g sugar brought to 145 c and quickly stirred in the prepared mix. Use a tall pot. Quickly pour in a lined rectangular pan. When cold you can break by hand.
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#22 basquecook

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:30 PM

My take on pasta con sarde. I started, a while ago, with the recipe in Zak Pelaccio's Eat With Your Hands and over time I've modified it enough that I guess I can call it my own. I use good quality canned sardines in place of fresh ones. I use ~250g roughly chopped cherry tomatoes in place of the two chopped tomatoes Pelaccio calls for. The sofrito contains some diced fennel bulb and a shallot in addition to the garlic and anchovy fillets (Ortiz) he calls for. I keep the Pernod-soaked raisins (the Pernod, which he says you can drink if you're feeling frisky, is pictured in the background) and pine nuts whole rather than chopping them. Finally, I leave out the fennel pollen. It's hard to get and really quite expensive. I've even stopped bothering adding in a few toasted and chopped fennel seeds like I used to: I find the leafy bits and diced fennel bulb and pastis give me enough of a fennel/aniseed kick.

 

DSC_0007_zpsd8fbe1c8.jpg

 

Really pretty.. is that bucatini?  looks a lot thicker than your normal spaghetti


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#23 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:35 PM

 

My take on pasta con sarde. I started, a while ago, with the recipe in Zak Pelaccio's Eat With Your Hands and over time I've modified it enough that I guess I can call it my own. I use good quality canned sardines in place of fresh ones. I use ~250g roughly chopped cherry tomatoes in place of the two chopped tomatoes Pelaccio calls for. The sofrito contains some diced fennel bulb and a shallot in addition to the garlic and anchovy fillets (Ortiz) he calls for. I keep the Pernod-soaked raisins (the Pernod, which he says you can drink if you're feeling frisky, is pictured in the background) and pine nuts whole rather than chopping them. Finally, I leave out the fennel pollen. It's hard to get and really quite expensive. I've even stopped bothering adding in a few toasted and chopped fennel seeds like I used to: I find the leafy bits and diced fennel bulb and pastis give me enough of a fennel/aniseed kick.

 

DSC_0007_zpsd8fbe1c8.jpg

 

Really pretty.. is that bucatini?  looks a lot thicker than your normal spaghetti

 

 

No, it's just spaghetti. I mean, assuming the guys I bought it from differentiate between spaghetti and spaghettoni. 


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#24 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 01:13 AM

DSC_0021_zps1210ed24.jpg

 

An experiment in smoked lamb shoulder. I worked from Zak Pelaccio's recipe for smoked goat shoulder in Eat With Your Hands. I've attempted the recipe before, using actual goat, with limited success. Goat just wasn't right for this dish. Or, rather, I'm sure lovely, expensive baby goat would be. I'm sure it would be grand. I'm a big fan of goat. But the stuff I can get locally ... well, after much experimentation I just don't bother any more. It's not very good. In this or in any other application. I guess next time I see expensive baby goat I'll keep an eye out for a slightly-not-so-expensive shoulder or something.

 

Anyway, the dish in its original form has a rub comprised of extra virgin olive oil, chilli (a few mild ones with a couple of birds thrown in), parsley, ginger, garlic and salt. I retained that, essentially, using generic supermarket red chillies for the mild component and a lone bird's eye. I thought I had ginger on hand but I didn't so I ended up going with the dried stuff. Pelaccio recommends marinating the shoulder for a full day but it's not like the marinade is going to penetrate the meat a whole lot so I only gave it about five hours. It was smoked at my gas-powered smoker's lowest setting, over hickory, for a little more than seven hours. I served it with a simple 'dressing' made from Greek yoghurt, fresh mint and lemon juice.

 

Thoughts:

  • The meat itself was pleasant enough. I didn't use crazy expensive lamb as this was an experiment but, hey, I reckon it'd be real nice if you cooked nice lamb this way. The meat itself wasn't the issue. Maybe it could have done with an extra thirty to sixty minutes but I didn't want it to hit pull apart stage: pulled meat, such as pork shoulder, shouldn't reach the point of being meat paste, so far as I'm concerned. We're not making rillettes, here.
  • Flavour penetration was poor. The skin was paper thin and pleasant enough in the greasy way slow cooked lamb skin is but ... I don't know. I'm not sold on the idea of mostly fresh ingredients in the rub. I'd be tempted to use dry chilli, dry garlic and dry ginger next time. Maybe with some paprika or even cumin thrown in. Alternatively, a vinaigrette containing some of the core ingredients--some minced chilli, garlic and ginger with, say, some sherry vin--might do the job. Something to cut through the inherent fattiness of this cut of meat and give it a shot in the arm, flavour-wise. I mean, the lamb taste was definitely there but lamb is a meat strong enough to stand up to chilli, garlic and other flavours making their presence known. I'm almost thinking of something that might pop up in a David Chang recipe. You know, like his octo vin or the fish sauce vin. Heck, octo vin might be a good place to start.
  • The yoghurt thing was a last minute thought and while it didn't clash with the meat it ... it was that dinner party guest that never brings so much as a bargain basement bottle of almost-vinegar cleanskin wine. Not the one that careens around your place drunkenly and downs a bottle of your Talisker from the bottle and gropes female guests but the one that's just ... there. You know the one. That guy ... that guy is the yoghurt dressing I thought of at the last minute.
  • Rather than serving this as roast lamb I reckon it could work nicely in a sandwich sort of deal. Maybe with some sort of crunchy salad thing going on. Nothing fancy pants. Maybe some tomatoes and red onions and cabbage or spinach leaves. An acidic dressing. Sort of a nod to a pulled pork roll without going so far as to slather everything in sticky sweet barbecue sauce.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 08 January 2014 - 01:15 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#25 glennbech

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 02:07 PM

Hi group,

 

I made some pressure cooked chicken stock inspired by MC at home the other night. I say "inspired", because I did not use the exact measurements - and used only wing meat. (The recipe uses both ground leg meat - and wing meat).

 

Today I infused the stock with some roasted peppercorns, star anise, ground ginger, ground garlic, red chillies and parsley. I put the boiling stock over some finely cut vegetables  and put in some shrimp.

 

Awsome stcok, the shrimp did not do it justice, but this is everyday cooking and the chicken I wanted to use was frozen. The only thing missing for me was cilantro. 

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  • suppe.jpg

Edited by glennbech, 08 January 2014 - 02:12 PM.

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#26 Paul Bacino

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 03:30 PM

Glennbech,

 

Great Picture..btw

 

I sure it was good!!

 

Anna

 

Looks delish!!

 

Chris

 

Thanks for the descriptions,  very nice

 

Basque

 

Franci--was a bad girl!!  :cool:


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#27 judiu

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:51 PM

Chris, maybe if you jacquered (?) the outside of the meat, the flavours might penetrate better? Even if you just poked the meat with a thin paring knife and rubbed the marinade in? Oh, and the "meh" yogurt sauce can be jazzed up a little with garlic, and I'd like cucumber in it, but that's JMHO. I love taziki...
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#28 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 02:09 AM

Chilled seafood salad. The prawns, scallops and fish (rock ling) were poached with a little bit of garlic in a mixture of water and fino sherry (well, fino apera--real fake Australian sherry that can't be called sherry ever since we signed up to some free trade agreement or treaty or something). The mussels were steamed in a little apera, too. The seafood was chilled and combined with tomato, capsicum, cucumber, parsley and red onion. The dressing was made with extra virgin olive oil, chardonnay vinegar (eyeballed to equal parts) and the strained mussel cooking liquid. I think it was good although when I scaled the quantities of the ingredients down from the recipe (Frank Camorra's second book, MoVida Rustica) I kept the amount of mussels the same. The mussels somewhat dominated the seafood mix. I guess next time I'd half the quantity and add in the squid that I left out from the original dish.

 

DSC_0032_zps5402f6e7.jpg

 

EDIT

Stabbing holes in the meat is an idea I might look into. I guess I didn't consider that as I've never felt the need to that with brisket or pork shoulder, altho' I guess in the case of those the depth of penetration isn't a big deal: slices of flat aren't terribly think while the outer layers of pork get mixed with the inner bits during the pulling process. Unless you're taking it into meat paste territory, it's a bit harder to overcome the problem with lamb shoulder (unless you bone it out first, I guess, sacrificing the structural integrity the shoulder blade provides).


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 09 January 2014 - 02:14 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#29 Morkai

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 10:41 AM

Polish Gołąbki. 

3leGm1Kl.jpg

 

sFj1WmLl.jpg

 

kKEYJeLl.jpg


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#30 Ann_T

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 11:52 AM

Thanks Liuzhou,  thanks Scubadoo.

Anna, your shrimp and zucchini looks delicious.  

Glenn, great photo.  The colours are amazing.  I imagine it tastes as good as it looks.

Chris, beautiful salad.  Something that my husband would love.

A few of our meals so far this year.

 

Spicy%20Beef%20in%20Black%20Bean%20Sauce

 

Spicy Beef Tenderloin in a black bean sauce.

 

Sterling%20Silver%20Prime%20Rib%20Januar

 

Presalted a little Sterling Silver Prime Rib on Saturday and roasted it on Monday.

 

Chicken%20Enchiladas%20January%208th%2C%

I had a craving for a Mexican dinner last night.  Put a pot of black beans on to simmer earlier in the day. Poached chicken breasts and made an enchiladas sauce.   Chicken Enchiladas with homemade corn tortillas.

 

Mexican%20Breakfast%20Chilaquiles%20Janu

Breakfast -  Chilaquiles -  with black beans and scrambled eggs.


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