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Name This Pastry


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Matthew Kirshner

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:25 PM

Hi All,

 

  I have been going through my recipe notebooks and came across a morning pastry I have not done in a long time.  It was taught to me from my Swedish Pastry Chef years ago, but the problem is someone(aka my kids) decided to draw in the book now I can not read out the name.

 

  This is the best way to describe it:  It is a pate-a-choux piped in a round then a small round of sweet dough placed on top prior to baking.  After the bake, we use to fill the inside with rasp. jam/pastry cream/vanilla whipped cream. 

 

  If anyone has made or seen this type of pastry, please let me know what the name is.  Have a Merry XMAS and Happy New Year!!



#2 tug

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:19 PM

Hi All,

 

  I have been going through my recipe notebooks and came across a morning pastry I have not done in a long time.  It was taught to me from my Swedish Pastry Chef years ago, but the problem is someone(aka my kids) decided to draw in the book now I can not read out the name.

 

  This is the best way to describe it:  It is a pate-a-choux piped in a round then a small round of sweet dough placed on top prior to baking.  After the bake, we use to fill the inside with rasp. jam/pastry cream/vanilla whipped cream. 

 

  If anyone has made or seen this type of pastry, please let me know what the name is.  Have a Merry XMAS and Happy New Year!!

Are you thinking of, perhaps .. Gâteau Saint-Honoré?


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#3 Kerry Beal

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 01:55 PM

Sounds more like Saint-Honoré than Paris-Brest.



#4 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 03:20 PM

It's a Saint-Honoré for me as well.


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#5 JeanneCake

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:15 PM

I am reading the OP as describing an individual choux puff.  So to that end, I've seen some pastry chefs use a thin sweet dough, rolled very thin, placed on top of an individual choux puff before baking.  I'm trying to remember where I saw this, possibly it was in Herme's dessert book but I will have to find the book to check.

 

St Honore usually has caramel dipped puffs along the edge of the round but it could be plain puffs as well.



#6 Mette

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:21 AM

maybe a Scandi-recipe? In Denmark we have the Wales bun (nothing to do with Wales....), which is puff pastry with choux piped on top, baked and filled with pastry cream and jelly, and the Swedes have the Maskastavar Kringle, which is similar.



#7 HQAntithesis

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 07:56 AM

I think the name you're after is craquelin.



#8 Matthew Kirshner

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 12:23 PM

Thank you HQ, that's it!!