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I will never again . . . (Part 4)


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#61 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 05:46 PM

I will try never again to slosh water out of a pot into a cast iron skillet heating up to sear meat. I had a momentary thought... "Geez! I hope that doesn't catch fire!" WHOOSH! FLAME ON! :shock:
Thankfully, I had another empty skillet near to hand, which quickly smothered the 3 foot high flame.
No permanent damage done and DH proclaimed my dinner of Varkenshaas (skillet) and Brussels sprouts (pot) to be one of best efforts of late! :rolleyes:


On a related note, in the future I shall refrain from adding blanched and still wet vegetables (in my case, Brussel sprouts) to a very hot cast iron skillet to avoid redecorating my whole kitchen with grease! :sad:

#62 Justin Uy

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:28 PM

Never again will I try to sear anything with extra virgin olive oil!

Still clearing the smoke out

#63 Broken English

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 02:11 AM

Never again will I put icing sugar and flour into identical containers and not label them. Pasta and chantilly cream turned out rather disappointing.

Never again will I toast nuts without a timer set.

Never again will I ask a first year apprentice to strain the stock without expressly stating I need the liquid, not the bones.

Never again will I pick up a pot filled with scalding hot oil just emptied from the frier without announcing to everyone not to move, and double checking my surroundings.

Never again will I absent mindedly grab pans out of the oven with no cloth. Actually, that ones a lie, I totally will.
James.

#64 kaszeta

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 06:04 AM

I've got several dishes that involve cooking something in the skillet, then roasting the whole skillet in the oven (usually at a very hot temperature), and then finishing the dish back on the stovetop. All too many times I've done this, neglected to put the handle cover on the skillet, and then absentmindedly grabbed the (friggin' hot) skillet handle and ending up with a massive 2nd degree handle-shaped burn on my palm.

I can say that "Never Again Will I Forget To Put The Handle Cover On The Hot Skillet", but I will forget. I know it.

#65 ScoopKW

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 07:59 AM

I've got several dishes that involve cooking something in the skillet, then roasting the whole skillet in the oven (usually at a very hot temperature), and then finishing the dish back on the stovetop. All too many times I've done this, neglected to put the handle cover on the skillet, and then absentmindedly grabbed the (friggin' hot) skillet handle and ending up with a massive 2nd degree handle-shaped burn on my palm.

I can say that "Never Again Will I Forget To Put The Handle Cover On The Hot Skillet", but I will forget. I know it.



Go to the hardware store and buy a pair of welding gloves - today. Welding gloves are one of those "hardware store solutions to cooking problems" that everyone should look at. Like microplane rasps, which most people have already embraced.

Welding gloves are SO much better than oven mitts. I can't imagine life without them, both professionally and at home. I have two pairs. One for work. One for home. And they're cheap. There is simply no downside to welding gloves.

If I could only bring two things to work, my choices would be a razor-sharp gyuto and a pair of welding gloves. If I could bring three, I'd add my OXO peeler. But I gots to have my welding gloves.
Who cares how time advances? I am drinking ale today. -- Edgar Allan Poe

#66 Zeemanb

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 09:02 AM

May have already mentioned this one about 19 times....

I will never again clear the remnants of freshly ground chipotle powder from my spice grinder by blowing down into the chamber. My eyes made me look like a stoned Marty Feldman for the rest of the day. Bad stuff.

#67 Darienne

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 09:47 AM

Go to the hardware store and buy a pair of welding gloves - today. Welding gloves are one of those "hardware store solutions to cooking problems" that everyone should look at. Like microplane rasps, which most people have already embraced.

Welding gloves are SO much better than oven mitts. I can't imagine life without them, both professionally and at home. I have two pairs. One for work. One for home. And they're cheap. There is simply no downside to welding gloves.

If I could only bring two things to work, my choices would be a razor-sharp gyuto and a pair of welding gloves. If I could bring three, I'd add my OXO peeler. But I gots to have my welding gloves.

Absolutely brilliant!!! :smile:
Darienne


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#68 lindag

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 07:23 AM

Set my electric pressure cooker on my ceramic stove top (to save counter space) and accidentally bumped the knob turning the element to HIGH. Went outside to do something in the yard and when I returned the entire cooker was melted onto the burner...I was able to save the lid for whatever that was worth. I was also able to save the stove top; there was no discernable damage done and it actually cleaned up perfectly after a couple hours cool-down time and a bit of scraping with a paint scraper and some cleaner.

#69 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 08:14 AM

Put a honey-whole-wheat sponge on to fluff up, then go downtown for an errand that I think should take me only half an hour. Yeah, three hours later when I got home it had outgrown its 2 gallon bowl, popped the saranwrap cover, and gooped out onto my countertops. It was on its way to the floor, and I swear that if I hadn't gotten there then, it would have developed sentience....

Now of course I know that I can't go further than the corner store while a sponge is on.
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#70 Justin Uy

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 06:46 PM

Ugh, so in a yet another "never again moment". I sous vide a ribeye with salt/pepper/cayenne and went to sear it off in a skillet with canola oil on high heat.

The smoke that was coming off it near the end of the sear was like pepper spray and had me hacking up a lung, I can only assume that was courtesy of the cayenne. Not going to attempt that again until I figure out that issue.

Did I do something particularly wrong here? I know I've seen seared meats with cayenne involved before, and none of them mentioned noxious fumes. :(

#71 teapot

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 08:35 PM

I will never again scrape and scrape away at a nutmeg without first ascertaining if it's a shelled nutmeg.

For a hilarious "never again" video moment, I highly recommend watching this you tube video of a guy attempting to fry gnocchi.[] Starts a little slow but stay with it...it's infectiously funny:
frying gnocchi

#72 Blether

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:09 PM

... fry gnocchi...


:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: what a good sport :smile:

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#73 chefhenry

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 10:12 PM

I, for one, will never again agree to a catering gig in a "well equipped" kitchen without checking out said kitchen in person. Simple menu, only sixty guests or so for a friends wedding turned into the day from hell when the kitchen in the church basement turned out to be more poorly equipped, and not much bigger than, my home kitchen. Well equipped is quite the relative term I guess...

#74 Kouign Aman

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 07:21 AM

Note to self: full length gloves and a face shield have just become kitchen equipment. Check.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#75 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 08:44 AM

I will never again put my little melamine butter bowl in the microwave for what I think is 30 seconds but what is really 3 minutes.

Yup - boiling butter everywhere, melamine has buckled and is now useless for anything but thumbtacks, had to scrub the microwave and the glass tray and everything else.
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#76 Porthos

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 09:14 AM

I, for one, will never again agree to a catering gig in a "well equipped" kitchen without checking out said kitchen in person. Simple menu, only sixty guests or so for a friends wedding turned into the day from hell when the kitchen in the church basement turned out to be more poorly equipped, and not much bigger than, my home kitchen. Well equipped is quite the relative term I guess...

That hurts just to read it.

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#77 Icanmakeit

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:38 PM

I was in labor with my daughter and the 'nesting' instinct kicked in and I decided to make sour dough bread with the culture I had been growing for several weeks.
I went into big time labor and forgot about the rising dough. My husband went back to our apt after I had our daughter and found a huge gooey mess on the counter top and floor of sour dough gone wild.
I still am shocked as to how 3 cups of flour and a little bit of starter could have caused such a mess!

#78 Susie Q

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 06:35 AM

I was in labor with my daughter and the 'nesting' instinct kicked in and I decided to make sour dough bread with the culture I had been growing for several weeks.
I went into big time labor and forgot about the rising dough. My husband went back to our apt after I had our daughter and found a huge gooey mess on the counter top and floor of sour dough gone wild.
I still am shocked as to how 3 cups of flour and a little bit of starter could have caused such a mess!


Raising my hand vowing never to put a jar of just fed sourdough in the icebox, with a screw-top lid, and forget about it.

#79 maggiethecat

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:27 PM

I will never again leave the immersion blender in the jar -- turned off -- while I take a taste of the tomato sauce. Because, well,my finger slipped, turned on the blender, cut my index finger to the bone and made the side of the fridge look like the set of a slasher flick.

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#80 Darienne

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 07:13 AM

I will never again leave the immersion blender in the jar -- turned off -- while I take a taste of the tomato sauce. Because, well,my finger slipped, turned on the blender, cut my index finger to the bone and made the side of the fridge look like the set of a slasher flick.

First involuntary gasp and shudder of the day. That's terrible. Hope all is mended now.

Reminds me of the time my Father was trying to fix the stand mixer for my Mother and the beaters were in place and it was plugged in. For some unfathomable reason, my Mother turned it on while my Father's fingers were entwined in the beaters. Not a pretty picture. To this day, I wonder....... :raz:

At least you did it to yourself...
Darienne


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#81 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:02 AM

My sister managed to turn the blender on with her fingers inside years ago. She also got the wooden spoon into the mixmaster blades while making a banana bread, smashed the spoon to rat shit - made the bread anyway. We were spitting out chunks of wood the entire loaf!

#82 rob1234

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:32 PM

Go to the hardware store and buy a pair of welding gloves - today. Welding gloves are one of those "hardware store solutions to cooking problems" that everyone should look at. Like microplane rasps, which most people have already embraced.

Welding gloves are SO much better than oven mitts. I can't imagine life without them, both professionally and at home. I have two pairs. One for work. One for home. And they're cheap. There is simply no downside to welding gloves.


After reading this I went to home depot and bought two pairs of different welding gloves to try out since I've been unhappy with my current oven gloves getting too hot. Tested them out with a sheet pan in the oven at 375 for 10 minutes picking it up wearing my old mitt on one hand and the welding glove on the other. The welding gloves were burning my one hand before I could even feel heat on the old mitt hand. I'm returning them to home depot today. Is there a specific brand/model of welding glove you use?

#83 therippa

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:43 PM

I was making clarified butter and wasn't paying attention, so it burned. I usually just pour small amounts of fat down the sink (I know, but hey, I rent), but this time I said I'll do the right thing and pour it off into a can so it could cool down and then throw it away. I poured it into an empty soda can and left it in the sink. A couple minutes later I had to rinse something off and a little water splashed into the can. It started making popping noises and jumping around a little bit. I leaned over to look into it and suddenly it all blows out of the top of the can. Luckily I wear glasses so I didn't get scalding hot butter in my eyes. My kitchen was COVERED with butter, it took forever to clean up.

#84 therippa

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:44 PM



Go to the hardware store and buy a pair of welding gloves - today. Welding gloves are one of those "hardware store solutions to cooking problems" that everyone should look at. Like microplane rasps, which most people have already embraced.

Welding gloves are SO much better than oven mitts. I can't imagine life without them, both professionally and at home. I have two pairs. One for work. One for home. And they're cheap. There is simply no downside to welding gloves.


After reading this I went to home depot and bought two pairs of different welding gloves to try out since I've been unhappy with my current oven gloves getting too hot. Tested them out with a sheet pan in the oven at 375 for 10 minutes picking it up wearing my old mitt on one hand and the welding glove on the other. The welding gloves were burning my one hand before I could even feel heat on the old mitt hand. I'm returning them to home depot today. Is there a specific brand/model of welding glove you use?


This is the same problem I had with welding gloves, you need to get the heavy duty ones with insulation, not just heavy leather. They do not sell these kind at home depot.

#85 Derek J

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:29 PM




Go to the hardware store and buy a pair of welding gloves - today. Welding gloves are one of those "hardware store solutions to cooking problems" that everyone should look at. Like microplane rasps, which most people have already embraced.

Welding gloves are SO much better than oven mitts. I can't imagine life without them, both professionally and at home. I have two pairs. One for work. One for home. And they're cheap. There is simply no downside to welding gloves.


After reading this I went to home depot and bought two pairs of different welding gloves to try out since I've been unhappy with my current oven gloves getting too hot. Tested them out with a sheet pan in the oven at 375 for 10 minutes picking it up wearing my old mitt on one hand and the welding glove on the other. The welding gloves were burning my one hand before I could even feel heat on the old mitt hand. I'm returning them to home depot today. Is there a specific brand/model of welding glove you use?


This is the same problem I had with welding gloves, you need to get the heavy duty ones with insulation, not just heavy leather. They do not sell these kind at home depot.

Aargh! I wish this post had been up on Friday. I bought some welding gloves at Menard's Friday afternoon and was disappointed in them when I tried them out yesterday. I had to use a pot holder with them when I moved my roaster out of a 350 degree oven. I would have been fine with just the pot holders. I'll look out for heavy duty insulated ones next time. Any idea where I can find the good stuff?

#86 IndyRob

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:50 PM

Aargh! I wish this post had been up on Friday. I bought some welding gloves at Menard's Friday afternoon and was disappointed in them when I tried them out yesterday. I had to use a pot holder with them when I moved my roaster out of a 350 degree oven. I would have been fine with just the pot holders. I'll look out for heavy duty insulated ones next time. Any idea where I can find the good stuff?


You might be able to preserve your investment with the purchase of a couple of 'Ove' Gloves. Long ago I used welding gloves for their intended purpose and they're about keeping external, airborne slag from hitting your skin. Not for holding hot things. The Nomex Ove' Gloves are no good at protecting against hot liquids, but are good with dry ambient heat. Together, they could be a good pairing.

Edited by IndyRob, 14 November 2011 - 04:54 PM.


#87 heidih

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 05:02 PM


Aargh! I wish this post had been up on Friday. I bought some welding gloves at Menard's Friday afternoon and was disappointed in them when I tried them out yesterday. I had to use a pot holder with them when I moved my roaster out of a 350 degree oven. I would have been fine with just the pot holders. I'll look out for heavy duty insulated ones next time. Any idea where I can find the good stuff?


You might be able to preserve your investment with the purchase of a couple of 'Ove' Gloves. The Nomex Ove' Gloves are no good at protecting against hot liquids, but are good with dry ambient heat. Together, they could be a good pairing.


The guys in the neighborhood swear by the 'Ove' gloves when tending their very very hot and blazing fire pits - the kind you sit around. I have seen them reach into what seems to me an inferno, rearrange a log, and grin with satisfaction that their glove is the best.

#88 therippa

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 05:09 PM


Aargh! I wish this post had been up on Friday. I bought some welding gloves at Menard's Friday afternoon and was disappointed in them when I tried them out yesterday. I had to use a pot holder with them when I moved my roaster out of a 350 degree oven. I would have been fine with just the pot holders. I'll look out for heavy duty insulated ones next time. Any idea where I can find the good stuff?


You might be able to preserve your investment with the purchase of a couple of 'Ove' Gloves. Long ago I used welding gloves for their intended purpose and they're about keeping external, airborne slag from hitting your skin. Not for holding hot things. The Nomex Ove' Gloves are no good at protecting against hot liquids, but are good with dry ambient heat. Together, they could be a good pairing.


When I need to hold something REALLY hot I put on an ove glove and then one of the non-insulated welding gloves over it. This is a completely heat-proof solution, I've been able to hold things that were hot enough to make the leather smoke a little a felt no heat inside the glove.

#89 andiesenji

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 08:09 PM

You can get high heat welding gloves - the ones usually used for arc welding.

I have an old pair like these that I needed for handling hot glass when fusing and shaping glass in a semi-open kiln. The glass wasn't handled directly but the crimpers and other tools would get hot enough and the glass itself radiate enough heat that this degree of protection was necessary.
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#90 phatj

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 10:31 AM

...marinate several pounds of chicken in a mixture consisting largely of pureed raw pineapple.