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Dinner! 2013 (Part 6)


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#121 rotuts

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:44 PM

BP:

 

are those 'ordinary' cow tails or tails from older cows or Ox ?

 

Im wondering would that make a difference in flavor?  run of the mill cows are what, 1 1/2 Y.O. ?



#122 Anna N

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:23 PM

huiray,

Your uncooked dinner looks especially delicious. I keep promising myself to branch out into more unusual cold cuts. Perhaps in the new year I will make a point of visiting a decent deli to stock up. Thanks again for sharing.
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#123 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 09:02 PM

Christmas 2013

 

The hocks from Thomas Keller's Bouchon. I was unhappy that the foil, er, foiled by attempt to make a perfect log of meat. It was easier to get it right with cling film. That said, these things are easy as hell to prepare, store and portion. 

 

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The hocks with sauce gribiche (from the original recipe) and pickled vegetables. The pickles were from Momofuku. The course was matched with a pinot gris from Alsace. I'm rather fond of Dopff wines: cheap, cheerful and bloody good for the price. I think the pinot gris is the pick of the range.

 

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Elements of the main course, portioned and readied: potato pave (Ad Hoc at Home), hot applesauce terrine and corn pudding (both from Modernist Cuisine). The pave was a gamble. Russets are hard to get in Australia and the one source I was aware of only stocked small ones. Keller calls for potatoes that are approximately 500g each but these were in the 100-200g range. I was concerned this would fall apart so I had some extra potatoes sitting in the cupboard ready to make an emergency rosti.

 

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Pork scratchings from Heston Blumenthal at Home.

 

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The completed dish: all elements of Modernist Cuisine's Sunday pork belly (the red eye gravy was the version from MC@Home, though). It includes pork belly (62C/40 hours), hot applesauce terrine, corn pudding (sadly, this was a little thicker than my trial version--it didn't ooze when you cut into it, soft-cooked-egg-style, red wine cabbage and red eye gravy). The carrots were from Neil Perry's Rockpool Bar & Grill book, although I modified the seasonings by adding in some fennel seeds and celery seeds. They were bagged with a little bit of butter (less than Perry says because of the fattiness of the rest of the dish), salt, sugar and spices then steamed for about 30 minutes. This was paired with a riesling from Alsace.

 

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Two different desserts. Pudding + rum & raisin ice cream + chocolate ice cream (Fergus Henderon's Beyond Nose to Tail) + creme anglaise (Modernist Cuisine at Home) + crumble (cardamom shortbread, cocoa nibs and almond) and raspberries + creme anglaise + crumble + chocolate ice cream. The raspberries were for the communists that dislike pudding. They were partly frozen thanks to my new fridge. Let's pretend that was a feature and not a bug. I served this with a dram of Cowboy's Delight from the Scotch Malt Whisky Society: a rich 15-year-old Springbank. 

 

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Edited by ChrisTaylor, 25 December 2013 - 04:03 PM.

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#124 liuzhou

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 10:17 PM

Yesterday evening, being Christmas Eve, a friend and I decided to eat out. Unfortunately, so did everyone else in China. They have gone from totally ignoring it to adding it to their list of many, many holidays. It is very much Christmas with Chinese characteristics, though.

 

As a result, we were unable to get into the restaurant we wanted. We were given a ticket to indicate our place in the queue. No. 30. They had just found a table for No. 9. And people don't rush to finish.

 

So, we tried a few other places. They were all rammed full. Eventually we found a couple of perches in this 'hot pot' place.

 

Each diner has a smallish hot pot of their own built into the counter. Various broths were on offer. I chose a slightly spicy chicken variety while my companion went for a beef broth. She doesn't do spicy.

 

Then you order whatever you want to cook up in your broth.

 

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We had thinly sliced beef (top right above)  and thinly sliced lamb. These cook in seconds. Frozen tofu. Beef marrow. Pig's blood (to the left of the beef). Daikon radish (mooli). Winter melon (冬瓜). Enoki Mushrooms. Shrimp.

 

The apple was not part of dinner. That was another story.

 

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Sliced lamb on left. Actually, we asked for ducks' blood first, but they had sold out.

 

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Pig's blood beside my companion's hop pot bowl.

 

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Frozen tofu (top) and Beef marrow (bottom)

 

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Shrimp.

 

There is a station nearby where each diner can mix their custom dipping sauce from a vast array of ingredients. You can see  mine in the first picture to the right of the enoki mushrooms and my companion's choice beneath the lamb in the second picture.

 

We spent a happy hour and half working our way through this then went for a long walk. There was still a line of people waiting to jump into our just-vacated seats.

 

Merry Christmas, indeed.


Edited by liuzhou, 24 December 2013 - 11:53 PM.

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#125 Paul Bacino

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:34 PM

Still working off the " Tail " Motif

 

Braised tail in red sauce-- with meat and ricotta shells

 

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#126 Steve Irby

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 07:40 PM

Merry Christmas to all.  Dinner tonight was my take on Salmon Rockefeller as prepared by a local restaurant.  Grits with Gruyere, wilted spinach with Pernod, topped with grilled salmon, fried oysters and hollandaise.   I think it's the start of a new Christmas tradition. 

 

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#127 Norm Matthews

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 07:56 AM

I had planned a similar meal as basquecook . I was going to make the rib roast, popovers, broccoli salad and baked potatoes but a few hours after I got the roast, my nephew called and invited us along with the whole family to his house for Christmas dinner.  He had crab and smoked turkey. I took my roast along as my contribution.  Here is how I roasted mine.  It was a 4 bone, 7 1/2 lb. roast. First I took it out of the refrigerator a couple hours before putting in the oven. I preheated the oven to 500 and crusted the top of the roast with salt and pepper. In the oven for 30 minutes @ 500º, 45 minutes @ 325º then finished at 450º.  I took it out at 130º, wrapped it in heavy duty foil and  sliced it about 45 minutes later. 

 

ps the sauce was a mixture of Mayo, dijon mustard, grainy mustard, horseradish, sour cream, and salt.


Edited by Norm Matthews, 26 December 2013 - 08:01 AM.

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#128 basquecook

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 08:13 AM

Sounds like a great night Norm.  



#129 Keith_W

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 08:14 AM

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Christmas eve dinner at my place. All set up with Christmas crackers. 
 
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Jansson's Temptation - a Swedish potato gratin. The difference is that it is made with onions and sprats. Instead of using breadcrumbs, I used Gruyere. 
 
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Sugar snap peas with anchovies and whiskey. 
 
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The main course - tunnel boned Poussin stuffed with couscous and briefly smoked, shaved smoked ham, turkey jus.

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#130 basquecook

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:59 AM

 I am so confused.  

My father in law had his hip removed two weeks ago so, our yearly Christmas party of 70 people had been cut down to 11 family members.  My mother in law brought manicotti made from crepes, marinated mushrooms and her famous and revered caviar pie.  It is a multi layer thing whihch starts with a layer of egg yolks, then whites, then there are onions, mayo, and then the whole thing is topped with black caviar.  It's really cool when she takes it out of the spring form and places it on a cake plate..  I have an idea of turning it into a parfait and adding a crunchy element but, I digress.  

 

For appetizers, we stared with cheese plates.  Then fried calamari and fried lemons.  We had New Orleans BBQ Shrimp served on toasts.  

 

I am terrible with photos lately.. 

 

This was my only photo of the appetizers.  You can see the shrimp head in the back about to be used for stock in the BBQ Shrimp.  

 

 

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We had a 14 pound rib roast. .Covered in fat, then marinated, then roasted

 

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Taken out of the oven at 120

 

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Served with a porcini gravey, scallion yorkshire puddings and creamed spinach. 

 

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We served it family style.  

 

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For dessert, my mother made a cheesecake, my favorite chocolate mousse cake, (a three layer cake filled with mousse) and 4 types of xmas cookies..  

 

Definitely a fun night.   Chocolate cake for breakfast Xmas morning.   


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#131 rotuts

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:15 AM

"""  Braised tail in red sauce-- with meat and ricotta shells ""

 

those shells are about the best Ive ever seen;   like the crispy edges, etc etc

 

stuffed with recotta +,  then baked in a meat sauce ?



#132 Paul Bacino

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:43 AM

RT..

I will make my own red sauce..this red sauce I did in a pressure cooker, ox tails needed the pressure to get done in time..for the shells. I really am not a fan of sauce that way..but it works with addition of fresh canned tomato.

I put a base layer of sauce..to which I place the shells...then sauce the shells lightly. Making sure the suce comes up half way on the shells...so the shells kinda braise in the sauce..cook covered@325 for 40 min..then up temp uncover.. For 20 mins @350-375
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#133 rotuts

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:54 AM

I would very much like to have a full Rx on these shells including the PC of the CowTails

 

this sounds like something Im going to have to get out of my chair and add to my armamentarium.

 

I like the PC idea, and the "fresh canned tomato" aspect.  I use the canned that the Test kitchen recommends (organic)

 

no rush.  you can PM me anytime if you dont want to reveal All Here.

 

BTW  do you use 'regular' dry shells and rehydrate first rather than boil and use?

 

Im keen on trying that as the boil / cool / fill tires me out.  :huh:

 

Not the Cork Pulling though ...



#134 Paul Bacino

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 07:52 PM

First : Stuffed ricotta shells

http://forums.egulle...-ricotta-cheese
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#135 Paul Bacino

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 08:16 PM

Beef Stuffed shells

http://forums.egulle...-Stuffed-Shells
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#136 Baselerd

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:49 PM

Chris, what did you think of the Sunday Pork belly? That was one of my favorite plated dishes from that book (of the ones I've cooked). 

 

Here's a dish I came up with randomly, starting with the caramelized coconut cream from the Modernist Cuisine. I tried to tie it into a Thai flavor theme: thai-marinated sous vide beef cheeks (cured overnight then cooked in a thai beef broth reduction @ 140 F for 72 hours), caramelized coconut cream, roasted cauliflower, pickled carrots, beef thai-curry demi-glace. 

 

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Edited by Baselerd, 26 December 2013 - 09:52 PM.

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#137 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 10:33 PM

Chris, what did you think of the Sunday Pork belly? That was one of my favorite plated dishes from that book (of the ones I've cooked). 

 

 

I think it is very good, although I'm surprised they didn't do something with the skin.


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#138 basquecook

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 11:08 PM

Well, now my mother in law broke her foot today.. So, I had to leave work early and head up the Taconic about a hundred miles to take care of them.    We arrived with no food in the house with the exception of two lambs we recently purchased.  I stopped by the Portuguese Butcher and grabbed a can of tomatoes, three carrots, celery, an onion, a can of chickpeas a bag of string beans and a bag of potatoes and some chorico.  I knew if all else fails there would be soup,  They have been broken down and were in the basement fridge.. Apparently, my wife's cousins, raised a couple of lamb as part of a school project.  At the end, the sent the lambs to the slaughter. The young kids were told they would be happily frolicking at some farm.  As long as we never mention the lambs to the kids, they are happy for us to have the meat. 

 

The lamb is beautiful.  Seriously, like delicious.  

 

I opened a pack of 4 chops and there was some loin with the belly flap.  Served with some string beans and mushrooms. Chops were thick, cooked about 3.5 minutes on both meat sides and about 2 minutes on the fat side.. came out perfect medium rare.. the roast was slightly longer. 

 

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This is what the roast looked like as the butcher didn't remove the chine so, I had to cut as  far as I could and then snap the rest with my hands.  Lack of knives, left me getting a little more hands on. but i trimmed it prior to hitting the table. 

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To start we had Portuguese Chorico and chickpeas in a tomato wine soup.  With lots of shredded collard greens. I took the vegetables and the meat out in order to let the collards cook longer.  We arrived at like 4 o clock and at dinner around 630.. It was all really about getting dinner on the table.  everyone was super happy, despite everyone's condition. 

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Edited by basquecook, 26 December 2013 - 11:15 PM.

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#139 Anna N

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 05:17 PM

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Supermarket rotisserie chicken (over cooked and dry) and roasted kabocha squash.
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#140 Steve Irby

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 08:16 PM

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Supermarket rotisserie chicken (over cooked and dry) and roasted kabocha squash.

My condolences.



#141 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 03:06 AM

I bought a bullshit free range organic turkey on Boxing Day--significantly cheaper than what you'd pay for one prior to Christmas--and hit it with a wet rub under and on top of the skin. I parked it in my gas smoker w/ a mixture of apple wood, cherry wood and mesquite and took it to 71C. I was very happy with it. I served it with a gravy (pressure cooked turkey/chicken stock reduced to 200mL and thickened with Ultrasperse M), Keith_W's popcorn salad, the freekah salad from Cumulus Inc and some leafy greens.

 

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Edited by ChrisTaylor, 28 December 2013 - 03:09 AM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#142 CeeCee

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:25 AM

Keith_W's popcorn salad

This sounds interesting, but a search didn't help me find more details unfortunately. Could someone point me in the right direction please?



#143 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:28 AM

 

Keith_W's popcorn salad

This sounds interesting, but a search didn't help me find more details unfortunately. Could someone point me in the right direction please?

 

 

4 corn on the cob, microwave 90 sec each, shaved
1 red onion, diced
2 tomatos, deseeded and diced
pickled Jalapeno, diced
1 avocado, diced (at the last minute)
juice of 1-2 limes (squeezed and added at the last minute)
salt and pepper to taste
coriander leaves to taste
popcorn, about 50g, added at the last minute

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#144 CeeCee

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 05:30 AM

Now that's swift, thanks Chris!



#145 Prawncrackers

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 04:41 PM

Howdy!  Been lurking a lot recently, but I thought I'd surface after cooking this amazing piece of beef for Xmas dinner. An untrimmed five rib Dexter, aged for about 6 weeks - I cut the ribs short, rendering the fat for another day and saving the trim for burgers. Seasoned the whole joint two days before Xmas. In the morning I roasted it at 100C for about 4hrs until the internal temp reached 40C. It was rested for two hours then seared all over just before serving, it turned out perfectly. Best roast beef that the family has ever eaten. To quote my cousin it was "the beef of dreams"!

 

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#146 basquecook

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 08:58 PM

Prawn, that looks ridiculous. 

 

 

Tonight, we roasted a pork shoulder for 11 people..  10 pound pork shoulder was 1.79 a lb.  roasted at 325 for 6 hours.. served with this peach and mustard gastrique.  

 

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Started with some cheeses. a gorgonzola piquante, some sort of pecorino, a vacherin and a brillat savrin.  

 

In addition, shrimp cocktail, marinated mushrooms and green beans and this really nice

 

 

 

Portuguese Chorico pan seared with pickles.. 

 

 

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Caesar Salad 

 

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#147 Keith_W

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:57 PM

Keith_W's popcorn salad

This sounds interesting, but a search didn't help me find more details unfortunately. Could someone point me in the right direction please?


That's because I invented it ;) So far everyone whom i've served it to seems to want to know the recipe, which is a good sign!
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#148 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 12:57 AM

 

 

Keith_W's popcorn salad

This sounds interesting, but a search didn't help me find more details unfortunately. Could someone point me in the right direction please?

 


That's because I invented it ;) So far everyone whom i've served it to seems to want to know the recipe, which is a good sign!

 

 

I'm pleased to say my guests last night liked it. 


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#149 Dejah

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 12:58 PM

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Supermarket rotisserie chicken (over cooked and dry) and roasted kabocha squash.

Get yourself a Big Easy for at home, Anna, and you'll never have to put up with supermarket over-cooked rotisserie chicken again!


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#150 Anna N

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 01:05 PM

attachicon.gifimage.jpg
Supermarket rotisserie chicken (over cooked and dry) and roasted kabocha squash.

Get yourself a Big Easy for at home, Anna, and you'll never have to put up with supermarket over-cooked rotisserie chicken again!

Dejah, my yard is only just big enough for a BBQ! I have an electric rotisserie that does a wonderful job in about 1 1/2 hours but this was one of those days when I wanted something fast and easy. I'll fall for it again when the memory fades.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog