Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Dinner! 2013 (Part 6)


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
192 replies to this topic

#1 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:55 PM

[Moderator note: The preceding section of this discussion (find it here: (Dinner! 2013 Part 5)) reached the 20-page mark, which is the point at which a topic becomes too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it again.]

 

 

Tonight I pulled from the freezer 2 SV duck legs confit. Although the skin was beautiful these were nothing compared to the label rouge legs I used to buy in France. 4 for 16 euros, cannot do it here...
These legs were salted 24 hrs and cooked at 75 c for 10 hrs. They don't have the pulled apart texture of confit.

image.jpg


Edited by Mjx, 07 December 2013 - 03:26 AM.
Moderator note added.

  • judiu, Ann_T, glennbech and 5 others like this

#2 scubadoo97

scubadoo97
  • participating member
  • 1,963 posts
  • Location:Dunedin, Florida

Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:26 AM

Franci do you think adding time or temp would give the pull apart texture or is it the technique or product that is too different to yield that pull apart texture?

Edited by scubadoo97, 07 December 2013 - 05:27 AM.


#3 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,370 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:24 AM

post-6903-0-72620400-1386436950.jpg

Pickled herring, roast beef on pumpernickel washed down with ice cold akvavit.

Edited by heidih, 07 December 2013 - 10:34 AM.
Rotate image

  • judiu, patrickamory and Vlcatko like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#4 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 12:51 PM

Franci do you think adding time or temp would give the pull apart texture or is it the technique or product that is too different to yield that pull apart texture?

 

The previous time I did 80 C for 12 hours, but didn't really salted enough and for enough time. Any suggestion?



#5 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,370 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 07 December 2013 - 01:29 PM

Franci do you think adding time or temp would give the pull apart texture or is it the technique or product that is too different to yield that pull apart texture?

 
The previous time I did 80 C for 12 hours, but didn't really salted enough and for enough time. Any suggestion?

Why not try the Modernist Cuisine times and temps? Cure for 10 hours, rinse and dry then sous vide at 82C for 8 hours. Worked for me.
  • nickrey and Vlcatko like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#6 Bojana

Bojana
  • participating member
  • 208 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 01:35 PM

I followed MC recipe and it was pull apart. Cure 10 hours, copok at 82C for 8 hours.


  • Vlcatko likes this

#7 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 02:39 PM

Ok, thanks. When I'm done with the other two legs in the freezer, I'll try that!



#8 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,378 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:22 PM

Lamb shoulder marinated in Julia's spice marinade mixture and then grilled on Persian skewers

 

L1050511_zps6217a1d6.jpg


  • judiu, Ann_T, glennbech and 2 others like this

#9 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 4,680 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:55 PM

I just love those sword like blades.

 

in my middle eastern places they sells those

 

easy to turn

 

some what Ottoman 

 

OK   Persian

 

some what from tribes that had those blades   in the past.


Edited by rotuts, 07 December 2013 - 03:57 PM.

  • judiu likes this

#10 Okanagancook

Okanagancook
  • participating member
  • 284 posts
  • Location:Naramata overlooking Lake Okanagan, British Columbia, Canada

Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:27 PM

I'll third the MC confit recipe.

#11 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,265 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 07 December 2013 - 07:21 PM

It's been temps around -20C, windchill plus -30 these last few days. Today was -30C with windchill -40C. Definitely NOT Big Easy days.

 

Some recent meals:

 

Thai Curry Seafood stew:

 

Thai Seafood Curry Plated 1968.jpg

 

Last night was our daughter's birthday dinner. She requested Chexican fajitas. I made Spanish rice, loads of guac., chicken fajita, and roasted prime rib for the wraps. She was happy.

 

Chicken Fajita1972.jpg

 

Roast Beef Fajita1973.jpg

 

Tonight, it was s-i-l's pork ribs with his "never-the-same-twice" rub and fresh pineapple based sauce. Definitely finger-licking good!

 

Ryan's Ribs2012.jpg

 

 

 


  • judiu, Ann_T, Shelby and 4 others like this
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#12 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 08:10 PM

Maybe you are bored of seeing my usual grilled sardines...because that's what we had for dinner.

image.jpg


But beside that I also experimented a bit this idea
http://forums.egulle...t-making-dough/

Really nice. I made the mistake of not shaking some of the flour from the "gnudi", so I got some patches of uncooked flour but definitely a keeper. I have more, so I'll try again tomorrow.

image.jpg

After two days in durum flour

image.jpg

image.jpg

image.jpg
  • judiu, gfweb, Shelby and 6 others like this

#13 DiggingDogFarm

DiggingDogFarm
  • participating member
  • 732 posts
  • Location:Finger Lakes Region of New York State

Posted 07 December 2013 - 08:17 PM

Looks great Franci....I love grilled sardines!!!!


~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious and radical farmer, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 


#14 basquecook

basquecook
  • participating member
  • 371 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:17 PM

Pretty meal Franci.. Where do you get your sardines?

 

Away from home again.  But, before i went, we had a chance to have a little fried chicken off in our house.   Miss A did a twice fry with batter while, i did a traditional buttermilk soak and then dip in flour.   I like to fry my chicken at a super low temp.  

11263125026_5cb0297d81_z.jpg

This was miss A's chicken.. mine is missing from the shot.. 

 

11263121096_439cde865f_z.jpg

 

One thing i got from all of this.. We deep fried Oreida Crinkle Cut sweet potato fries.. I hate sweet potato fries but, these were actually really good.  In fact, i may say they were the best sweet potato fries I have ever had. The first time I think I have ever purchased frozen french fries before. I served with curry ketchup

 

11263119196_87b539bf5b_z.jpg


Edited by basquecook, 07 December 2013 - 09:18 PM.

  • judiu, gfweb, Shelby and 2 others like this

#15 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,378 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:45 PM

basquecook - mouthwatering pictures. What's the theory behind the frying chicken at superlow temp?



#16 Steve Irby

Steve Irby
  • society donor
  • 192 posts
  • Location:Pensacola FL

Posted 07 December 2013 - 09:54 PM

Supper tonight was a little bit of this and that.  Roast chicken using Judy Rodgers recipe.  

 

P1020331(1).JPG

 

 

And a few dishes based on produce from our local farmers market.  White sweet potatoes with satsuma and bourbon honey glaze, turnips and greens with guanciale, and baked cauliflower leaves and stems with pickled pork. 

 

P1020333(1).JPG   


  • scubadoo97, Ann_T, gfweb and 3 others like this

#17 Ttogull

Ttogull
  • participating member
  • 237 posts

Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:18 PM

@steveirby. That is a nice spread, and a nice selection of dishes! I can almost taste it!

Can you provide a little more info on your cauliflower leaf and stem dish? I have several plants (cauliflower and broccoli) that I should probably harvest tomorrow morning before the snow and ice, and a couple of 2.5lb birds ready for the BGE assuming the weather is not too nasty.

#18 Steve Irby

Steve Irby
  • society donor
  • 192 posts
  • Location:Pensacola FL

Posted 08 December 2013 - 11:16 AM

@steveirby. That is a nice spread, and a nice selection of dishes! I can almost taste it!

Can you provide a little more info on your cauliflower leaf and stem dish? I have several plants (cauliflower and broccoli) that I should probably harvest tomorrow morning before the snow and ice, and a couple of 2.5lb birds ready for the BGE assuming the weather is not too nasty.

Thanks, this is the first time I cooked the leaves and stems and the dish turned out to be really tasty.  I got a giant cauliflower (6#) at the farmers market with the leaves attached.  I cut the leaves from the stems and sliced the leaves thinly.  I chopped the stems in the food processor with lots of fresh baby vidalia onions and garlic.    I sauteed the stem mix in bacon fat till they started to soften then added the julienned  leaves and cooked the mixture until  they sweated down.  I had some pickled pork in the freezer that I cubed, browned and added to the greens. All the ingredients were combined, with addition of chicken stock, and baked in a casserole dish for about an hour.  


  • judiu likes this

#19 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 08 December 2013 - 11:36 AM

Where do you get your sardines?
 


Union market on Court, usually on Friday.

#20 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,378 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:59 PM

Scarlet runner beans with roasted garlic, cloud ear mushrooms and chiles:

 

beans_saoking_zpse094ebce.jpg

 

garlic_mushrooms_chiles_zpsa172828b.jpg

 

onions_zpsdb33fe13.jpg

 

beans_ingredients_zpsa43be8eb.jpg

 

beans_finished_zpsa4ef333c.jpg


  • judiu, Shelby, Vlcatko and 2 others like this

#21 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 5,370 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:55 PM

image.jpg

I am becoming a huge fan of chicken confit a la Modernist Cuisine. Here it is on some sauteed zucchini with sun-dried tomatoes.

image.jpg

And shredded for Franci.
  • judiu, Ann_T, Shelby and 3 others like this
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#22 Franci

Franci
  • participating member
  • 1,043 posts

Posted 08 December 2013 - 05:58 PM

Oh, thank you, Anna! I should try that, also because chicken is so much cheaper here.



#23 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,254 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:48 PM

A treat the first week of December every year (depending on conditions and limits), fresh Dungeness Crab.  Steamed, chilled, cracked served with melted butter and fresh lemon.

 

007.JPG


  • Dejah, judiu, Ann_T and 4 others like this

#24 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,649 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:57 PM

Crab looks good David - price/pound?

#25 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,254 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 08 December 2013 - 07:20 PM

$12.00 per pound.  Some supermarkets in the Northwest sell crab this time of year for as low as $3.99 per pound, but sometimes it's crab that's a few weeks old.  My fishmonger only sells deep-water crabs that have a harder shell and larger body and he gets them in fresh daily within a day of harvest.  Last year's commercial season was terrible, but we think this season is looking pretty good.


  • judiu likes this

#26 C. sapidus

C. sapidus
  • participating member
  • 2,568 posts
  • Location:Maryland

Posted 08 December 2013 - 09:11 PM

Dejah – We are getting some of your weather (and, um, you can have it back :rolleyes: ), otherwise I would have been out making ribs with pineapple sauce.

 

Patrick – I love seeing your bean dishes

 

Made a batch of chile paste with toasted pasilla and mulato chiles, roasted garlic, Mexican oregano, black pepper, cumin, and some of Mrs. C’s chicken stock. Chile paste should show up later this week.

 

Beef and butternut squash with pasilla-honey sauce – Seared beef chuck and fried chile paste simmered with chicken stock. Cubed butternut squash added about half-way through, and honey drizzled in at the end. Garnished with cilantro and served with diced white onion. Supremely popular.

 

p522118791-4.jpg

 

Cucumber, orange, and radish salad – Tossed with lime juice, salt, cilantro, and mild chile powder, and topped with pickled red onion (parboiled red onion slices, cider vinegar, cumin, garlic cloves, S&P, and Mexican oregano)

 

p476883819-4.jpg


  • Anna N, Dejah, judiu and 5 others like this

#27 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,265 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:46 AM

C.sapidus: How is the Mexican oregano different from the "usual" variety? I have asked friends down in Mexico to bring some back for me.

 

Love how that pickled onion adds so much colour to an already colourful salad. Do I have to use Mexican oregano to achieve the same flavour if I try to make the recipe now?


Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#28 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 664 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:15 AM

Beef and butternut squash with pasilla-honey sauce – Seared beef chuck and fried chile paste simmered with chicken stock. Cubed butternut squash added about half-way through, and honey drizzled in at the end. Garnished with cilantro and served with diced white onion. Supremely popular.
 
p522118791-4.jpg


Do you have a recipe for this? Sounds fantastic!
  • Ann_T likes this

#29 judiu

judiu
  • participating member
  • 2,245 posts
  • Location:South Florida

Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:33 AM

A treat the first week of December every year (depending on conditions and limits), fresh Dungeness Crab.  Steamed, chilled, cracked served with melted butter and fresh lemon.
 
attachicon.gif007.JPG


David, you are truly evil %)! I live in South Florida, and all the Dungeness crab I've ever seen has been frozen, and not very good rewarmed! That looks SO good!
  • David Ross likes this
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

#30 C. sapidus

C. sapidus
  • participating member
  • 2,568 posts
  • Location:Maryland

Posted 09 December 2013 - 10:50 AM

C.sapidus: How is the Mexican oregano different from the "usual" variety? I have asked friends down in Mexico to bring some back for me.

 

Love how that pickled onion adds so much colour to an already colourful salad. Do I have to use Mexican oregano to achieve the same flavour if I try to make the recipe now?

 

 

 

 

Dejah – If I am out of Mexican oregano I substitute regular (dried) oregano without much change in flavor. I do prefer Mexican oregano, though, although I can’t say exactly why. You can mail-order from Penzeys or Spice House, but I’m not sure about their policies/costs on shipping to Canada.

 

 

I have not tried fresh Mexican oregano. My understanding is that there is more than one similar plant species that is called by that name in the kitchen.

 

 

Beef and butternut squash with pasilla-honey sauce – Seared beef chuck and fried chile paste simmered with chicken stock. Cubed butternut squash added about half-way through, and honey drizzled in at the end. Garnished with cilantro and served with diced white onion. Supremely popular.
 

Do you have a recipe for this? Sounds fantastic!

 

 

 MikeHartnett – Thanks! Recipe was adapted liberally from “seared lamb (or pork) in swarthy pasilla-honey sauce” in Rick Bayless Mexican Kitchen. The recipe pops up pretty readily on a search.


  • Dejah and MikeHartnett like this