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eG Cook-Off #64: Confit

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#61 davidkeay

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:21 PM

I was planning on refrigerating it anyway, so that's good to hear. I also put a pinch of salt in the bottom of the jars, so perhaps that will help keep the gelatin safe (if over salted). Thanks! 



#62 Steve Irby

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 07:23 PM

I was planning on refrigerating it anyway, so that's good to hear. I also put a pinch of salt in the bottom of the jars, so perhaps that will help keep the gelatin safe (if over salted). Thanks! 

The liquid is released from the legs as they cooked and is probably not carryover from prep.  Most juice evaporates but what is left is SDT (so damn tasty).  The gelatin is fantastic in sauces or to moisten rillettes. As long as the fat cap is in place it will keep for quite a while, at least as long as the confit meat.  



#63 davidkeay

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 08:00 PM

 

I was planning on refrigerating it anyway, so that's good to hear. I also put a pinch of salt in the bottom of the jars, so perhaps that will help keep the gelatin safe (if over salted). Thanks! 

The liquid is released from the legs as they cooked and is probably not carryover from prep.  Most juice evaporates but what is left is SDT (so damn tasty).  The gelatin is fantastic in sauces or to moisten rillettes. As long as the fat cap is in place it will keep for quite a while, at least as long as the confit meat.  

 

 

Oh yes, it's great stuff. I just wasn't sure it would be protected by the fat cap the way the meat is. Glad to hear it should be fine. I've got 3/4 of a pint of it in the fridge I get to use up now, which should be fun!

 

I haven't noticed any flavor difference with this batch despite it being half goose fat. For some reason, I can get goose fat cheap ($4/lb) here, but duck still ends up being $10 a pound at best. 



#64 David Ross

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 06:31 PM

Just prepped some whole quail for confit.  They won't yield much meat, but it's more of an experiment rather than a quail confit feast.  I'm either going to roast them whole or shred the meat and put it in spring rolls, maybe with a Korean bbq sauce.



#65 Okanagancook

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 10:20 PM

Got my hands on some fresh ducks which included the gizzards. I did them confit along with a couple of duck legs. Wow, are they ever tasty, tender little morsels.

#66 boudin noir

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 02:00 PM

Got my hands on some fresh ducks which included the gizzards. I did them confit along with a couple of duck legs. Wow, are they ever tasty, tender little morsels.

I can get chicken gizzards very cheap. Has anyone confit'd them? if so are they good?

#67 Okanagancook

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 02:31 PM

Boudin Noir, I would think they would be as good as the duck gizzard although they are quite a bit smaller so wouldn't take as long...the duck gizzards were in the fat with the legs for 9 hours at 190 F (oven). I think you could start checking the chicken gizzards after four hours to see if they are tender. They will be quite a bit of work to trim before the confit step. I looked at them today in the freezer section and decided to tackle them later due to the work load. Good luck.

#68 jayt90

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 07:40 AM

Encouraged by the simplicity of chicken confit, I tried a confit last week.

I had 12 pieces of thighs, wings and drumstick. The cooking vessel looked much like David's when packed and topped with lard, except the pieces were individual .

 

I cooked them for 6 hours at 200 F. 

After cooling I pulled two leg portions for dinner, and sent the rest to the fruit cellar.

 

While delicious and tender, I felt they were overcooked slightly.

I'll have to check my oven when set to 200 F, 

but next time I'll pull from the oven when a piece reaches 185  F at the bone.

 

I used supermarket lard (Maple Leaf) and that seems to be bland and innocuous, plus inexpensive. 

I'll re-use the chicken fat/lard combination for duck leg confit in a few weeks.

 

Chicken legs are great for learning about this ancient method. Thanks David.


Edited by jayt90, 15 December 2013 - 07:45 AM.

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#69 David Ross

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 04:42 PM

You make a great point--chicken is a wonderful ingredient for learning and experimenting with confit.  It's cheap, readily available and can stand up to the traditional or sous-vide methods.  Best of all, the results are incredible.  It's really quite amazing how this process can make a humble chicken so delicious.

 

I've got my whole quail cooked and now encased in fat so I'll let it sit this week and then prepare it next weekend.  I've got a first course in mind for the quail and a warm salad.



#70 Anna N

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 06:17 PM

Tonight I enjoyed another one of the chicken legs with some mashed sweet potato (I posted it in the Dinner Topic). In the fridge I have some pork shoulder curing which I shall confit (SV) at 80 C for 14 hours or so.
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#71 jayt90

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 02:50 PM

There are pre Christmas turkey sales on now.  I bought one today to keep until mid winter, when I will separate it and confit the legs, thighs, and wings. 



#72 ahpadt

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 05:37 PM

I'm looking in 'Under Pressure'. It says 82.2C for 12 hours for pork belly although that sounds slightly long to me. Has anyone tried doing it at that temp for that long?

 

I'm doing pork belly for christmas and was originally planning to vacuum it with some duck fat (yeah, it's not REALLY confit, but traditional confit is kinda messy imo) and simmer it at about 80c for 6-8 hours...



#73 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:16 AM

Did up some chicken legs confit in duck fat according to Modernist Cuisine.  

 

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Chopped each into bits.

 

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Into the Thermomix with a bit of cognac and a big spoon full of the jelly.

 

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Emulsified in the duck fat from the bags as well as a bit extra. 

 

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Topped with a bit more duck fat. 

 

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Now I need some sort of pickle to go with this - will have to search the cupboards.

 


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#74 rotuts

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:26 AM

would this be a type of 

Rillettes

 

but finer?

 

crusty bread ?  Plonk ?  Gherkins ?

 

dont have a thermo-X but might try this in a cuisinart.


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#75 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 11:33 AM

Ah yes - forgot to introduce it - Poulet Rillette!  I think it's not too much finer that it's supposed to be.  Probably eat it at work - so no plonk - but gerkins of some sort and on Ak mak crackers I think.


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#76 KennethT

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 12:41 PM

I'm looking in 'Under Pressure'. It says 82.2C for 12 hours for pork belly although that sounds slightly long to me. Has anyone tried doing it at that temp for that long?
 
I'm doing pork belly for christmas and was originally planning to vacuum it with some duck fat (yeah, it's not REALLY confit, but traditional confit is kinda messy imo) and simmer it at about 80c for 6-8 hours...

Check the original SV index page - there's tons of info on pork belly...
http://forums.egulle...x/#entry1777784

#77 Anna N

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:38 PM

Tonight I enjoyed another one of the chicken legs with some mashed sweet potato (I posted it in the Dinner Topic). In the fridge I have some pork shoulder curing which I shall confit (SV) at 80 C for 14 hours or so.


Well the pork shoulder was definitely a failure. I used the cure from Joy Adams "In the Hands of a Chef" and even though I was careful to thoroughly rinse it off the end result was inedibly salty. And time and temp did not produce the silky, melting texture I had hoped for. Back to the drawing board.
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#78 catdaddy

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:13 PM

Ah yes - forgot to introduce it - Poulet Rillette!  I think it's not too much finer that it's supposed to be.  Probably eat it at work - so no plonk - but gerkins of some sort and on Ak mak crackers I think.

It would make a great stuffing for pasta, too.


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#79 David Ross

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 05:56 PM

I for one think the discussion and use of sous-vide and more modern techniques for crafting confit has been a great learning experience for an old tradionalist like me. 



#80 judiu

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:19 PM

Kerry, what about some quick pickled red onion as a "go with"? Just thinkin'.
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#81 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:05 PM

Kerry, what about some quick pickled red onion as a "go with"? Just thinkin'.

Thinking some quick pickle of some sort will be needed - maybe even the quick pickled mustard seed from Momofuku.



#82 David Ross

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 08:00 PM

Tonight I finished the Quail Confit dish. 

 

Started with Quail that I buy at the local Asian grocery store.  Six quail sell for about $10.00, an incredible buy and the only place in town where I can buy quail.  Frozen by the way.

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The the same basic method as the chicken confit-heavily seasoned with Kosher salt, then black pepper, bay leaf, garlic, black pepper and crushed juniper berries.  The quail sits in the fridge for two days.

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The quail is slowly roasted in pork lard in a 200-225 oven for about 4 hours.  Then refrigerated in the fat for one week.  Before serving tonight I reheated the quail in the oven to melt the fat.

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Then very gently removed the quail from the fat, separated the legs and thighs to garnish the plate.  Pulled the breast meat off the carcass and sauteed to heat it through.  Served with a warm salad of crimson lentils, (locally harvested in Montana), with bacon, onion and apple cider vinegar.  Then a drizzle of red wine sauce over the quail and around the plate.

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A pretty good dish, especially the warm lentil salad.  You could toss the confit in the salad and it would be fabulous.  The quail confit was good, but I must say I now prefer the chicken.  In fact, I think I prefer chicken over duck and quail for confit. 

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#83 David Ross

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 12:41 PM

I'm thinking about doing a beef tongue confit.  However, I'm not sure how or when I should do the salting stage.  Typically I boil tongue first, not only to cook it but to be able to remove the outer skin.  If I salt the tongue and let it cure a few days, will the salt penetrate through that thick layer of outer skin?  And will the salt then start to cure the meat?  I could boil the tongue, remove the skin and then cure it in lard, but I think eliminating that salting stage would rob the tongue of classic confit technique and flavor?  Any ideas? 



#84 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 01:52 PM

It takes some time to cure tongue without injection...not only is the skin tough...the meat is very dense.

I'd skin it before curing.

 


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#85 Steve Irby

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:20 AM

I finally got around to a piece of pork confit that I prepared when the challenge first started.  It's been resting in the back of the refrigerator in it's bed of pork fat for about four months.  I used a pork flank steak that I seasoned with a New Mexico spice rub and let it rest for a few days.  I then simmered it in rendered pork fat until tender and then off into the refrigerator.  The was pork trimmed out of a Tamworth hog that I butchered the previous fall.

 

Getting ready to melt off the fat.

 

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A few succulent slices.

 

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And a quick quality control check.

 

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#86 rotuts

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:26 AM

loks very delicious

 

never knew that pork flank steak was sold.

 

wonder where it all goes ?



#87 Steve Irby

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:38 AM

Rotuts -I trimmed the steak out while breaking down a whole hog so it was not purchased at a market.  A specialty butcher may have pork flank but at a processing plant it would go in the sausage mix as trim.  One of the nice things about home butchery is the ability to use these "off cuts" that never make it to the supermarket.  



#88 rotuts

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:51 AM

lucky you on the 'trim'   :biggrin:

 

I wonder why so much of the pig goes into sausage mix.  we must eat a lot of sausage. !

 

have you seen " pig in a day" or 'Pig for a Day "

 

 

Im not sure how much this show.  have the whole vid somewhere.

 

Yum Yum 

 

it seems to be the whole vid, 1 : 30 min


Edited by rotuts, 23 March 2014 - 10:52 AM.






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