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Dressing up the baked potato


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61 replies to this topic

#31 emilyr

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 04:27 PM

If I'm not going to have chilli, cheddar and sour cream (my favorite meal when I was 10 and still comfort food now!), I like to go for some still crisp, blanched asparagus and cream whipped with dry mustard powder. Lots of salt and pepper.
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#32 Benjamin439

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 04:52 PM

You need sour cream and fresh chilies

#33 JimH

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 04:55 PM

Chopped BBQ, cheese & onions

#34 sjemac

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Posted 29 December 2008 - 05:20 PM

Chopped BBQ, cheese & onions

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Salmon caviar, pepper and creme fraiche.

#35 Boy R D

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 10:52 AM

sauteed mushrooms, bacon crumbles and a young melty gorgonzola
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#36 sadistick

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 01:01 PM

Butter and Truffles
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#37 YPants

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:10 PM

Chopped BBQ, cheese & onions

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Salmon caviar, pepper and creme fraiche.

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oh man, sweet idea...

#38 Jaymes

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:04 AM

So you've got your steaming-hot baked potato.  Whether it's got a crispy skin because you rubbed it with butter and then baked it naked, or a more tender skin because you're a 'wrap it in foil' aficionado, now it's ready to eat, and you're going to gild the lily.

 

What do you do?

 

Salt and pepper, of course.  Goes without saying

 

Bacon and chives are not in the same family, so, sure, both of them.

 

But which dairy?  Sour cream?  Butter?  Cheese?  All three?  They're all members of the same family, so are all three really necessary?

 

And if you're counting calories, low-fat Ranch Dressing?

 

A barbecue-lover, so chopped brisket?

 

A chili-lover, so a ladle of Texas Red?

 

A veggie lover, so a spoonful of Jaymes's Calabacitas recipe with squash, tomatoes, green chiles, cheese & corn?

 

And, once you've made this critical decision, how exactly do you go about your topping procedure?

 

Do you slit and squeeze?

 

Do you cross and squeeze?

 

Do you lay the whole thing out completely bare and mash?

 

And finally, how does your story end?

 

Eat the peel?

 

Or no.

 

 


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#39 ElsieD

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:10 AM


Slit down the middle, prop the two halves apart, add sour cream and chives or, if chives are not available, finely chopped green onions. That's it.

#40 maydd

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 11:33 AM

I cross and squeeze (not necessarily in that order), pummel in some extra thickened home-made chunky mushroom soup or idem tomatoey baked beans with belly pork...



#41 Lisa Shock

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 12:16 PM

Mine don't have a real peel, because I use a method I heard James Beard talk about on the radio which creates a crispy crust on the outside of a peeled potato. That said, I cut down the middle, fluff, and pour on beurre noisette and sprinkle a little salt.


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#42 Jaymes

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 01:45 PM

Mine don't have a real peel, because I use a method I heard James Beard talk about on the radio which creates a crispy crust on the outside of a peeled potato. That said, I cut down the middle, fluff, and pour on beurre noisette and sprinkle a little salt.

 

I am curious about this. Honestly, after I've finished off most of the potato and toppings, I get out a sharp knife and cut up the peel and eat it.  It's really one of my favorite parts.  Not to mention that I've always been told it's got lots of good nutrients.

 

What is the advantage of having no peel?


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#43 FauxPas

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:22 PM

I like the Hasselback style lately. Simple, with olive oil, garlic and some herbs. Or a bit of Parmesan. I love the peel, too! 

 

But every now and again, I get a craving for a full-meal loaded potato. These pics at Closet Cooking had me salivating: Fully Loaded Hasselback potatoes



#44 Shel_B

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 04:50 PM

For myself, after baking the 'taters are split, I add just a scosh of oil, butter, or now ghee, throw on a sprinkle of S&P, and that's it.

 

I may mash the meat or not.  If mashed, the skin is eaten last.  If not, then I cut off a piece of potato with skin on and enjoy it.

 

Now, for Toots, who likes her potatoes with an egg or two, I'll bake her some variation of an "Idaho Sunrise,"  and one for myself as well.


.... Shel


#45 Goatjunky

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 04:52 PM

Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio

Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.

But leftover broccoli and cheese is awesome

Sour cream and if i am lucky enough a little caviar

I basically want most of this list

http://www.buzzfeed....dinner?s=mobile
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#46 janeer

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:12 PM

Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio
Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.
s=mobile]http://www.buzzfeed....dinner?s=mobile[/url]


This is what I do.

#47 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 09:48 PM

Rub with olive oil, bake in rock salt 450 deg F for an hour (pierce all over with fork after 30 minutes).  When done stick with fork and smash several times against a cutting board or plate.  Salt, and pour on olive oil.  Serve with sour cream and fresh ground pepper.  More salt as necessary.  Consume whole thing.  I want one now.

 

I don't use butter for baked potato, as often as not I'm serving hollandaise or bearnaise on something else.


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#48 Ammy

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 01:00 AM

As far as I'm concerned, I always topped mine with fresh guacamole and dairy free "Sour cream", I heard that it's better than butter but it's up to one of us.



#49 Lisa Shock

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 01:23 AM

 

Mine don't have a real peel, because I use a method I heard James Beard talk about on the radio which creates a crispy crust on the outside of a peeled potato. That said, I cut down the middle, fluff, and pour on beurre noisette and sprinkle a little salt.

 

I am curious about this. Honestly, after I've finished off most of the potato and toppings, I get out a sharp knife and cut up the peel and eat it.  It's really one of my favorite parts.  Not to mention that I've always been told it's got lots of good nutrients.

 

What is the advantage of having no peel?

 

 

The peels contain the glycoalkaloid poisons solanine and chaconine. Most of the time, the levels of these is low enough to not do much harm. (That said, even low levels can affect a patient's reaction to anesthesia, so consumption of anything in the nightshade family up to a week prior to having a surgery is not advisable.) But, if a potato hasn't been handled properly (too cold, too hot, turned green in the light) levels rise and a person can be poisoned. Growers try to keep the levels low in new breeds, but, like any vegetable, individual specimens may have varying characteristics. People occasionally die from the poisoning, but, it's pretty rare. In 1979, in the UK an entire boarding school was poisoned by potatoes served for lunch, 17 boys were ill enough to be hospitalized.

 

I myself used to experience frequent stomach discomfort when eating potatoes. Once I stopped eating peels, I got better.

 

The method if pretty simple: pre-heat your oven to 500°, peel some big baking potatoes like russets, rub with oil, sprinkle with a little kosher salt, place in the oven on a tray or just on the racks, bake for 15 minutes then turn the temperature down to 250°, keep baking for another hour. They develop a crispy shell that is clean and smooth with no iffy spots.


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#50 Shel_B

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 06:04 AM

Rub with olive oil, bake in rock salt 450 deg F for an hour (pierce all over with fork after 30 minutes). 

 

I've seen baking in salt done with other food as well, but Ive never tried it.  Trying it with a baked potato seems like a good place to start.  Would you be kind enough to explain your technique?  Thanks!


.... Shel


#51 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 07:53 AM

Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio
Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.
s=mobile]http://www.buzzfeed....dinner?s=mobile[/url]

This is what I do.

Me, too. To finish the peel the best way is to add fresh butter, salt and pepper, then fold the peel over making a nice butter sandwich. The peel should be warm enough still to let the butter melt just a bit. Then eat -- sometimes with the fingers if the "sandwich" is big enough and there are no guests at the table.

This is only theoretical, these days, sadly. But it's what I used to do and if I were younger, again, and not prone to packing on the pudgy pounds these days, I'd still do it.
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#52 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:05 AM

 

Rub with olive oil, bake in rock salt 450 deg F for an hour (pierce all over with fork after 30 minutes). 

 

I've seen baking in salt done with other food as well, but Ive never tried it.  Trying it with a baked potato seems like a good place to start.  Would you be kind enough to explain your technique?  Thanks!

 

 

I have a dedicated baking pan filled with salt, with a rack to keep the potato off the bottom.  The potato is only partially covered in salt but I turn the potato when I pierce it at thirty minutes.  The skin comes out quite crispy.  I am tempted to try baking this way after removing the skin, as suggested by Lisa Shock.

 

Question for Lisa:  do you pierce your potato?


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#53 Lisa Shock

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 12:05 PM

Question for Lisa:  do you pierce your potato?

 

Yes, I do! So, oops, I missed a step in my instructions. My mom had some potatoes explode in the oven once because they weren't pierced, my family always pierces now.


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#54 MasteringTheFlame

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 05:59 PM

It all comes down to what I have on hand. The majority of the time I'm fine with butter and salt & pepper. If I have it on hand I prefer to top my with sour cream. Of course if I go to a baked potato bar, it is no holds barred...everything goes on it.



#55 Shel_B

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 06:11 PM

 

I've seen baking in salt done with other food as well, but I've never tried it.  Trying it with a baked potato seems like a good place to start.  Would you be kind enough to explain your technique?  Thanks!

 

 

I have a dedicated baking pan filled with salt, with a rack to keep the potato off the bottom.  The potato is only partially covered in salt but I turn the potato when I pierce it at thirty minutes.  The skin comes out quite crispy.  I am tempted to try baking this way after removing the skin, as suggested by Lisa Shock.

 

 

 

Thanks for your response.  While I like the skin, I also like 'taters sans skin, so Lisa's technique certainly seems worth trying.


Edited by Shel_B, 20 November 2013 - 06:11 PM.

.... Shel


#56 Meredith380

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 03:03 PM

Cut in half and cross hatched for maximum topping ratio
Butter, sour cream, chives or green onions, lots of salt n pepper of course.
s=mobile]http://www.buzzfeed....dinner?s=mobile[/url]

This is what I do.
Me, too. To finish the peel the best way is to add fresh butter, salt and pepper, then fold the peel over making a nice butter sandwich. The peel should be warm enough still to let the butter melt just a bit. Then eat -- sometimes with the fingers if the "sandwich" is big enough and there are no guests at the table.

This is only theoretical, these days, sadly. But it's what I used to do and if I were younger, again, and not prone to packing on the pudgy pounds these days, I'd still do it.

This is exactly what I do with the always on purpose leftover skins once my husband goes to bed. Delicious.
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#57 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 12:53 AM

I tried Lisa's method tonight...even if my potato cooked at 250 deg F for slightly longer than the hour specified.  There was a nice crust.  However the flesh was perhaps not as dry and flaky as an unpeeled potato baked at high temperature for an hour.  I wonder what would happen if one simply baked the peeled potato at 450 deg F for an hour rather than the two stage cooking?



#58 liuzhou

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 01:10 AM

Beans courtesy of Mr H and crispy bacon. Lots of pepper. Sorted.



#59 CeeCee

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 01:19 AM

If you ever find yourself in Instanbul, check out the Ortakoÿ area where you will find a decadently loaded version named kumpir. Butter and cheese are mixed through the interior, with sometimes really scary amounts of salt (warn upfront if you need to control your salt intake). After this you can choose from a wide array of generally previously jarred stuff like corn, peas, pickles (gherkins, cabbage, beets, carrots, etc.), but also Russian salad, bulgur salad kisir, olives, chopped onions and more. Topped with some sauce(s), you won't be hungry for a while again.

To get an idea, here's a little youtube footage:

 http://youtube.com/watch?v=PcWC9CGBjO0  and http://youtube.com/watch?v=JrtfYd5br00



#60 judiu

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 06:31 PM

...drool...
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"