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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)


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#241 Darcy

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 11:00 AM

Can anyone give me advice on marshmallows? I have made the recipe from C&C and it turned out a bit "wet"? I didn't like the texture. Also, do we need to add the invert sugar? He doesn't use it in his "at home" book, so I wondered what s the reason for it and if omitted what would be used to replace it? Does anyone use a different recipe other than Greweling?
I also have varying degrees of success with sponge candy and I notice he uses gelatin in his C&C book but not in the "at home" recipe. Can anyone tell me the purpose of the gelatin? I don't want to use unnecessary ingredients if it's not essential. Thank you in advance

#242 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 05:46 PM

Welcome Darcy.

 

I think the gelatin in the professional book helps with the structure - another trick is to put the container in a warm oven - then pour the hot sponge into the warm pan and leave it in the oven as it cools down.

 

I suspect the invert sugar in the marshmallow is for shelf life and perhaps texture - cream of tarter is used in some marshmallow recipes - that causes the inversion of sugar so would have much the same effect.  



#243 Darcy

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 08:46 PM

Thankyou Kerry, your answer is much appreciated! Caramels and Marshmallow, these are the candies I am trying to perfect but it's not easy. Can I ask what you would think the perfect depth for caramels are? I thought half inch? is this too deep? Most recipes I've tried tell you the size tin to use but the caramels always end up too thin



#244 Kerry Beal

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 08:51 PM

Thankyou Kerry, your answer is much appreciated! Caramels and Marshmallow, these are the candies I am trying to perfect but it's not easy. Can I ask what you would think the perfect depth for caramels are? I thought half inch? is this too deep? Most recipes I've tried tell you the size tin to use but the caramels always end up too thin

I guess it depends what I'm doing with them.  If they are just going to be cut and wrapped - then I like them a bit thicker - maybe even up to 3/4 inch.  For dipping in chocolate I might go thinner.  

 

If you are finding them thinner than you want - using caramel rulers would give you the option of making the 'tin' the size you want.



#245 Jim D.

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 06:41 PM

Ill try next time, thank you John smile.gif

On another recipe, the Cocomels, I just made a batch yesterday and I will coat them today. I have few questions for who already made these.

-I have already noticed that the recipe for his carame ( the one with evaporated milk ) produce a very sticky caramel, much different from the one I am used to, and I dont necessarily like it. Is that the way it is or its just me?

-The coconut caramel layer is still kinda sticky and when I cut into it it tends to fall over the caramel layer. So the result is a kinda sticky too mushy coconut layer and a little bit to hard and sticky caramel. I know already this recipe isnt for me, its too sweet and too sticky.

I dont know why I am having such hard time with his recepies, the theory works fine for all the ganaches, but the other recepies are always a disapointing, or maybe I am cursing myself thinking the recepie isnt going to work wacko.gif .

I am about to give up on some of his recepies and just keep the theory.

I am responding to an older post (6 years!) as I know the forum doesn't like new threads started when there are old ones on the same topic.  In any case I tried Greweling's cocomels today--without success.  I cooked the caramel to the prescribed temp and also tested it, but it got too hard.  I melted it down, added some cream, and got the temp more or less right as the caramel was firm but still pliable.  The coconut mixture was sticky, but seemed OK.  When I tried to cut the slab into bars, however, nothing went right.  Oiling the knife (as recommended) did no good.  The two layers got too distorted to look at all right.  So I quickly decided to form a "patty" shape with the caramel (now with its chocolate foot) on the outside, the coconut on the inside.  They looked OK (or so I thought).  I dipped them in dark chocolate, and slowly but surely most of the patties developed pinholes through which droplets of either caramel or coconut were oozing.  This got worse as I watched.  The pieces were delicious (though quite sweet), but completely unpresentable.  I quickly whipped up an alternate chocolate that includes both caramel and coconut, but molded so that I don't have to deal with shaping and dipping.

 

What I am interested in getting some advice about is the fact that the pinholes developed.  I am fairly certain the dipping chocolate was tempered properly.  The interiors appeared to be covered completely.  I know that coconut can interact with dark chocolate, but I understand that the reaction takes some time, whereas this happened immediately.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.



#246 keychris

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 10:43 PM

The chocolate was contracting around a slightly fluid filling, which didn't like being compressed, so it forced its way out of microscopic gaps in the chocolate that hadn't fully set. I have no idea how to prevent it :)



#247 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 01:44 AM

I was wondering whether it might not be a good idea to let the coconut mix "dry" overnight to improve the texture and hold.  This is often done wiith the coconut rochers before baking.



#248 Kerry Beal

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 05:21 AM

The chocolate was contracting around a slightly fluid filling, which didn't like being compressed, so it forced its way out of microscopic gaps in the chocolate that hadn't fully set. I have no idea how to prevent it :)

I suppose if you used over tempered chocolate it wouldn't contract as much and might help.



#249 Jim D.

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 10:40 AM

I was wondering whether it might not be a good idea to let the coconut mix "dry" overnight to improve the texture and hold.  This is often done wiith the coconut rochers before baking.

I did let the coconut stand overnight, and it appeared somewhat firm.  When I started to cut it, however, I saw that it was still quite soft underneath the crust that had formed.  I would love to see Greweling make this confection; the sample in his book is perfect.  It does seem to me that getting the caramel just right is quite difficult.