Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)


  • Please log in to reply
243 replies to this topic

#211 ritz55

ritz55
  • participating member
  • 10 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 06:44 AM

Ok! 3-4 mins more??

#212 minas6907

minas6907
  • participating member
  • 628 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 07:18 AM

I personally would get a probe thermometer. I think I know what you mean when you say they are traditionally used for liquids. A digital probe thermometer was one of the best things I invested it, much more accurate then the 'traditional ones I used before. Since your an expert at making the recipe by now with all your attempts, why not try boiling the liquid 30sec to 1min longer then you think it needs to, and see if that gets you a different texture. Basically, you just need to get more water out of your marshmallows.

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

#213 Chocolot

Chocolot
  • participating member
  • 421 posts
  • Location:Ogden, Ut

Posted 15 June 2012 - 07:41 PM

Beat until you can't beat anymore. The marshmallow will climb your beater(s) and it will be lukewarm. If in doubt, spoon a little out and see if it sets. If not and you can still beat more, do it. (Don't burn up your mixer:)

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com


#214 ritz55

ritz55
  • participating member
  • 10 posts

Posted 15 June 2012 - 09:42 PM

I did beat it till it was climbing the beaters and was like a stretched chewing gum if I may say so(sorry for the gross description :blush: )Would weather conditions affect this??

#215 Chocolot

Chocolot
  • participating member
  • 421 posts
  • Location:Ogden, Ut

Posted 23 October 2012 - 09:07 PM

Amazon just told me they have shipped the new book and I should have it next Tuesday. Yippee!!

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com


#216 minas6907

minas6907
  • participating member
  • 628 posts

Posted 23 October 2012 - 09:12 PM

Bah! I'm still waiting for my shipping notice! I'm amped about this one!

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

#217 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 355 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 24 October 2012 - 06:40 AM

Mine should be delivered today (arrived in my local post office at 1 am). Hooray!

#218 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,104 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 25 October 2012 - 02:25 PM

http://egullet.org/p1895558

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#219 minas6907

minas6907
  • participating member
  • 628 posts

Posted 25 October 2012 - 04:01 PM

Not sure if the threads will be combined, but I'll post my thoughts here.

Just got the book today, and as Chris said, it is noticeably larger. The sections I mostly refer to are the crystalline and non-crystalline sections. I noticed it includes information that was previously only in his at home book, such as the simple procedure for making cast lollipops, where as the previous professional book primarily spoke of making lollis from pulled sugar. Something I almost started a topic about here, but the new book now covers it, is how to make those small pillow after dinner mint type candies. When I look at the instructions it was a 'duh' moment for me. I love how simple they are, and sort of 'old timey.' I saw a large bag of those mints at the store a while back and though "Why cant I just make those?" Well now I can haha.

In the non-crystalline sections, there is a new laminated candy. Its a hard sugar base that is laminated with a chocolate filling...never heard of this, but looks nice. The finished pieces are then dipped in chocolate. Not too sure if I'll try this, perhaps after I make leaf croquant, but still the idea is cool.

One thing I was saddened about was the Turkish Delight recipe. I remember in a thread a while back Kerry said there would be a formula for Turkish Delight using regular cornstarch, and there is, but I was sort of hoping it would not be the same formula from his 'at home' book. That formula I would say only makes an ok delight. In a short time the outside crystallizes, and it loses the supple texture. I might give it a second try.

Another little change I noticed was in the formula for frappe. I does not list dry albumin anymore, which is better for me. Maybe I'll make some of this stuff up and add it to the taffy, see if I really like it included, otherwise I'll continue to omit, I dont really enjoy adding the jet puff stuff.

I'll post more thoughts as I read the book further.

#220 minas6907

minas6907
  • participating member
  • 628 posts

Posted 26 October 2012 - 12:16 AM

Heres a few other things I noticed. Greweling covers crystallized centers. I saw this on a YouTube video one time, but basically he pipes a ganache and submerges them in a super saturated sugar solution, then dried on a screen, leaving a crystalline layer over the centers. Also, where as in his previous book he only had a page or so that discussed panning, he now has a detailed section on how to go about the chocolate panning process.

#221 lebowits

lebowits
  • participating member
  • 551 posts
  • Location:Olney, MD

Posted 29 October 2012 - 11:17 AM

Mine should be delivered today (arrived in my local post office at 1 am). Hooray!


Just ordered my copy (again). Amazon had cancelled my previous "pre-order" over a month ago.
Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#222 RobertM

RobertM
  • participating member
  • 453 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:06 PM

Got mine a few days ago, haven't come up for air yet.....now I'm protecting it from Sandy....

#223 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 355 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 29 October 2012 - 01:36 PM


Mine should be delivered today (arrived in my local post office at 1 am). Hooray!


Just ordered my copy (again). Amazon had cancelled my previous "pre-order" over a month ago.


Bummer. Too humid to mess with chocolate right now anyway. It's a soppy mess here in central VA, and you have to be wetter than we are!

#224 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 374 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 27 December 2012 - 06:30 PM

The recipe for peppermint flake (2nd ed.) calls for chocolate liquor... is this unsweetened chocolate or something else?

#225 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,302 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 27 December 2012 - 06:44 PM

The recipe for peppermint flake (2nd ed.) calls for chocolate liquor... is this unsweetened chocolate or something else?


Unsweetened chocolate aka cocoa mass aka cocoa liquor.

#226 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 374 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 27 December 2012 - 06:54 PM

Thanks Kerry.

#227 JenBunk

JenBunk
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:40 PM

So I am making the Coconut squares form the book and had a question about the Frappe. I make the frappe last night and all seemed fine. It had the same consistency as marshmallow fluff. Well this morning I noticed that there was a sort of syrup on the bottom and what was on top had the texture of whipped egg whites. Did I do something wrong or is that normal? Should I whip it again? HELP??
Jenny
JB Chocolatier
www.jbchocolatier.com

#228 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,302 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 02 February 2013 - 07:34 PM

Mine has never separated - so not sure what might have happened. Perhaps Chocolot will weigh in - she's the expert in all things mazetta/frappe.

#229 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 374 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 02 February 2013 - 09:29 PM

For future reference, you can use marshmallow fluff instead of making your own Frappe. Pretty sure I read that in Greweling's At Home book.

#230 JenBunk

JenBunk
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 03 February 2013 - 01:40 AM

Update: I just threw it back in the mixer and put it on high and viola, it came back together. I was not expecting it to be that forgiving as sugar for me rarely is :smile:
For anyone who might make this in the future, I would suggest cutting the recipe to a quarter or at least half. I wasn't really paying attention and just went with the recipe and ended up with way more frappe than I know what to do with. Also the book says you need a 5 qt mixer (which is what I have) and there was no way that it was going to all fit in there.

Curls-I did know about the fluff substitute, but I am a glutton for punishment I guess:) I even made my own invert just for this recipe too! All I can say is this better be the best coconut confection EVER!! The fluff is looking pretty good right now.
JB Chocolatier
www.jbchocolatier.com

#231 JenBunk

JenBunk
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:06 PM

Can anyone tell me what the shelf life for the Frappe might be? I have a lot extra and I was wondering how long I have to use it up.
JB Chocolatier
www.jbchocolatier.com

#232 Chocolot

Chocolot
  • participating member
  • 421 posts
  • Location:Ogden, Ut

Posted 04 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

Put it in the fridge. Should last a few weeks. Might need to stir it again.

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com


#233 JenBunk

JenBunk
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 04 February 2013 - 05:48 PM

Thanks Ruth!
JB Chocolatier
www.jbchocolatier.com

#234 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 17 November 2013 - 03:04 PM

Hi Everyone,

 

I've been on a long break from chocolate making and have tried to plunge back in with Grewling's caramel cream filling (p. 210) today. I ended up with two batches of caramel cream filling, the first being a nice dark color, like the picture and the second being really light. So the dark one I made first tasted bitter so I figured somewhere in the process I must have burnt the sugar. So I tried again but this time I guess I didn't cook the sugar enough. The second one is also not as fluid as the first. Do you think I can cook it some more to get a deeper more caramel like flavor? Grewling advises to add more cream if it's not fluid enough, but how do I do that? Do I need to reheat it all and then add more cream? Anyone know what temperature the sugar should get to so I can achieve a caramel cream filling like Grewling's photo? 

 

Thanks!! 



#235 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 19 November 2013 - 05:22 AM

My two trays of caramel are still sitting on the counter. I'm not sure what to do with them. I'm tempted to try and 'recook' the light caramel with some more cream to see if it improves the taste and fluidity. The dark caramel has a slightly bitter taste, of burnt sugar. I'm worried about putting it in the chocolate and it tasting nasty. But I dont know what else to do with it. Any tips? 



#236 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 374 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 19 November 2013 - 06:19 AM

How about trying a little bit of your dark caramel with a bit of chocolate and see how it tastes. When you try them together you should be able to approximate how this will taste and decide if the bitter component is too bitter for you (or just right).

#237 Jim D.

Jim D.
  • society donor
  • 266 posts
  • Location:Staunton, Virginia

Posted 19 November 2013 - 06:27 AM

My two trays of caramel are still sitting on the counter. I'm not sure what to do with them. I'm tempted to try and 'recook' the light caramel with some more cream to see if it improves the taste and fluidity. The dark caramel has a slightly bitter taste, of burnt sugar. I'm worried about putting it in the chocolate and it tasting nasty. But I dont know what else to do with it. Any tips? 

About the dark caramel:  Recently I made a caramel that turned out darker than I had planned (the color change is very fast).  I went ahead and put it in molds with a Valrhona really dark chocolate.  I renamed these "burnt caramel" chocolates, and they were a big hit.  If you really want them lighter, you can heat the caramel and add some warm cream.  I have taken a caramel that was too fluid and recooked it, and it was fine.  As there is no chocolate in Greweling's recipe, you don't have to worry about what would otherwise be a complicating factor.  But before you "lighten them up," I would ask some people to try them.  Burnt caramel is very popular.  You could try it as a sauce over an apple dessert.  There is a place in Cambridge, Mass., that makes a fantastic burnt caramel ice cream that is one of their biggest sellers.



#238 chocofoodie

chocofoodie
  • participating member
  • 72 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 19 November 2013 - 07:07 AM

Thanks for the great ideas! I'll try it and see what happens. If the consistency is not as fluid now from sitting on the counter, should I heat it up to make it more fluid again? Or should I add cream to it?  

 

About the light caramel, can it be darkened? Is there such a thing? and can it be made more fluid? 

 

I was wondering if one of the things that went wrong the second time was because I was worried about it burning again I cooked it really really slowly. I mean it took forever to melt the sugar and I was stirring the whole time. I feel like the change in the process of cooking the sugar contributed to the change in fluidity the second time around. Is there any merit to this or am I completely wrong here? Because the second time not only was the caramel really light, it was also a much thicker texture, more like soft caramel you would dip rather than something you could pipe into a mold. 



#239 Jim D.

Jim D.
  • society donor
  • 266 posts
  • Location:Staunton, Virginia

Posted 19 November 2013 - 08:51 AM

If the goal is to get the dark caramel into molds, then I would heat it just a little, cool it off to the right temp for piping (Greweling says 77 F., Notter gives a higher temp)--you don't want to melt the chocolate in the molds.

 

I should give a disclaimer: there are many more knowledgeable people on this forum on the subject of caramel, so please take what I say as just suggestions.  Everything I know about caramel is from Greweling and Notter--oh, I should add, also from sad experience.  Greweling says (contrary to what seems rational) to cook caramel at a very high temp, to melt the sugar as fast as possible.  It's scary, but it does speed things up a great deal.  The trick is to take it off the heat a little before it's the color you want--easier said than done.

 

I don't know why you got a thicker texture the second tme; it should end up the same regardless of how you cooked it.  I would check Greweling's chart of what can go wrong with caramel.  The final texture is governed by the temp to which you cook it once the cream has been added.  I have had good luck with Notter's suggestion of 230 F.--it pipes easily into molds, firms up some, but stays soft enough to know you are eating caramel.  William Curley (in Couture Chocolate) says to take the caramel off the heat as soon as you add the cream (in his delicious orange and balsamic caramel), but I found that resulted in a caramel that never firmed up and had to be cooked longer.  By the way, note the photo accompanying the Greweling recipe you are using--the caramel is quite soft and flowing.



#240 Chocolot

Chocolot
  • participating member
  • 421 posts
  • Location:Ogden, Ut

Posted 19 November 2013 - 02:26 PM

If it is too firm, you possibly removed too much moisture from heating the cream. Did you keep it simmering while you slowly cooked the sugar? If you want it softer, add more liquid, but be careful not to make it too runny. i find Greweling's recipe right on. I wouldn't be afraid of the slightly bitter caramel. Many people like that. I like a little bit of burnt, but not too much. I have customers who love it really dark.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com