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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)


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#61 Elle Bee

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 05:07 PM

I don't remember where I got it, but I have a fondant recipe that calls for cooking the syrup, pouring it into a food processor, letting it cool to 60c, then blitzing it....

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Hello everyone, newbie here. There's a recipe for "Food Processor Poured Fondant" in The Cake Bible by Rose Beranbaum. Other than glazing petits fours, I've only used it to make the centers for chocolate covered cherries (which everyone in my family loves except me - I'm a caramel and nougat junkie myself). Just got Greweling's book about a week ago, and am eager to try the food processor method with his fondant. Meanwhile, here's the Rose recipe:

500g sugar
118g water
82g corn syrup

Cook to 238F. Immediately pour into food processor bowl, insert a clean thermometer, allow it to cool (uncovered) to 140F, add flavorings, process a couple of minutes until it's opaque, pour it into a sealable container, cool completely, seal it so it's airtight, and let it rest at room temp for 24 hours. To use, heat the fondant over a water bath, and thin it to the required consistency with a warm stock syrup (i.e., 30% - 1 part water to 2 parts sugar by volume).
Laurie Bergren

"Here let us feast, and to the feast be join'd discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind." Pope's Homer

#62 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 10:09 PM

I don't remember where I got it, but I have a fondant recipe that calls for cooking the syrup, pouring it into a food processor, letting it cool to 60c, then blitzing it....

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Hello everyone, newbie here. There's a recipe for "Food Processor Poured Fondant" in The Cake Bible by Rose Beranbaum. Other than glazing petits fours, I've only used it to make the centers for chocolate covered cherries (which everyone in my family loves except me - I'm a caramel and nougat junkie myself). Just got Greweling's book about a week ago, and am eager to try the food processor method with his fondant. Meanwhile, here's the Rose recipe:

500g sugar
118g water
82g corn syrup

Cook to 238F. Immediately pour into food processor bowl, insert a clean thermometer, allow it to cool (uncovered) to 140F, add flavorings, process a couple of minutes until it's opaque, pour it into a sealable container, cool completely, seal it so it's airtight, and let it rest at room temp for 24 hours. To use, heat the fondant over a water bath, and thin it to the required consistency with a warm stock syrup (i.e., 30% - 1 part water to 2 parts sugar by volume).

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Welcome Elle Bee - always happy to have another caramel and nougat junkie here on eG.

That looks like a really nice and easy way to make fondant. Even better than using a mixer I'd say.

I'll have to give it a try. Thanks for posting it.

#63 Darienne

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 05:23 PM

Hi Elle Bee,

Hello from one newbie to another :smile: , although I think I am more of a marshmallow (homemade ONLY) junkie at present. Hmmm...it's a close call between marshmallows and nougat.

As for caramel, you must try Kerry Beal's special caramel recipe. It's the very best.
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Cheers & Chocolates

#64 Tri2Cook

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Posted 11 January 2009 - 06:03 PM

I don't remember where I got it, but I have a fondant recipe that calls for cooking the syrup, pouring it into a food processor, letting it cool to 60c, then blitzing it....

View Post


Hello everyone, newbie here. There's a recipe for "Food Processor Poured Fondant" in The Cake Bible by Rose Beranbaum. Other than glazing petits fours, I've only used it to make the centers for chocolate covered cherries (which everyone in my family loves except me - I'm a caramel and nougat junkie myself). Just got Greweling's book about a week ago, and am eager to try the food processor method with his fondant. Meanwhile, here's the Rose recipe:

500g sugar
118g water
82g corn syrup

Cook to 238F. Immediately pour into food processor bowl, insert a clean thermometer, allow it to cool (uncovered) to 140F, add flavorings, process a couple of minutes until it's opaque, pour it into a sealable container, cool completely, seal it so it's airtight, and let it rest at room temp for 24 hours. To use, heat the fondant over a water bath, and thin it to the required consistency with a warm stock syrup (i.e., 30% - 1 part water to 2 parts sugar by volume).

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That must be where I got it. That or someone posted it online and I stumbled across it. I have it in one of my notebooks anyway. I have that book but I haven't had it out in a really long time so it's possible I wrote it down from there at some point. I have glucose wrote down instead of corn syrup but it's possible I made that alteration myself. I keep a large pail of glucose on hand so I rarely use corn syrup for anything.
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#65 RobertM

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 12:04 PM

Count me in as a Caramel Junkie - and a newbie - although I've been lurking around the corner, reading and absorbing all your knowledge - I hope that I'll be able to contribute to your knowledge and fun as well. In the meantime, I'm that shadow over there in the corner...

I have a very old confectionery book that calls for adding wheat flour to caramel - has anyone here ever heard of that? Or done it before? If so, what were your experiences?

Bob

#66 Elle Bee

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 05:50 PM

I don't remember where I got it, but I have a fondant recipe that calls for cooking the syrup, pouring it into a food processor, letting it cool to 60c, then blitzing it....

View Post


Hello everyone, newbie here. There's a recipe for "Food Processor Poured Fondant" in The Cake Bible by Rose Beranbaum. Other than glazing petits fours, I've only used it to make the centers for chocolate covered cherries (which everyone in my family loves except me - I'm a caramel and nougat junkie myself). Just got Greweling's book about a week ago, and am eager to try the food processor method with his fondant. Meanwhile, here's the Rose recipe:

500g sugar
118g water
82g corn syrup

Cook to 238F. Immediately pour into food processor bowl, insert a clean thermometer, allow it to cool (uncovered) to 140F, add flavorings, process a couple of minutes until it's opaque, pour it into a sealable container, cool completely, seal it so it's airtight, and let it rest at room temp for 24 hours. To use, heat the fondant over a water bath, and thin it to the required consistency with a warm stock syrup (i.e., 30% - 1 part water to 2 parts sugar by volume).

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Welcome Elle Bee - always happy to have another caramel and nougat junkie here on eG.

That looks like a really nice and easy way to make fondant. Even better than using a mixer I'd say.

I'll have to give it a try. Thanks for posting it.

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Thanks, Kerry! Rather in awe of everybody's knowledge here, so I'm happy to offer something from my own comfort zone (cake/cookies) that may prove useful to any of you candy mavens.

Meanwhile, I cautiously ventured into Greweling Land today with a quarter batch of Mint Meltaways (you know, sort of like putting one toe in the water first...). Used about 2/3 70% dark and 1/3 milk chocolate, with about 7 drops peppermint oil. They set up nicely, good flavor -- discernably minty, but not overwhelmingly minty. VERY melty, and just as soon as I finish my hot cocoa with Frangelico whipped cream*, I intend to enrobe them in some shiny dark chocolate (less messy than the confectioner's sugar Chef G. shows in the book).

*Took your advice from some other thread and bought an iSi cream siphon today. Yum - thanks for that tip! (Note to self: if you can't stay away from the whipped cream, fine. Just stop spiking it with alcohol before you put it in the siphon...)
Laurie Bergren

"Here let us feast, and to the feast be join'd discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind." Pope's Homer

#67 Darienne

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 01:26 PM

Second time for Greweling's wonderful Montelimar nougat. Confectionary partner, Barb, and I made it last summer and loved it. Dipped in 70% chocolate, it was exquisite.

This time seemed exactly the same...except that today, Day #2, the nougat is a tad tougher than I would like. Not beyond delicious, but I'm not thrilled with it.

Could this be heating the syrup to too high a temperature...which I don't think we did...or overbeating the end product...which I think we did. Or any other opinions. Please.

Thanks. :smile: (It will still be gone in a trice)
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Cheers & Chocolates

#68 cmflick

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:05 PM

Second time for Greweling's wonderful Montelimar nougat.  Confectionary partner, Barb, and I made it last summer and loved it.  Dipped in 70% chocolate, it was exquisite. 

This time seemed exactly the same...except that today, Day #2, the nougat is a tad tougher than I would like.  Not beyond delicious, but I'm not thrilled with it.

Could this be heating the syrup to too high a temperature...which I don't think we did...or overbeating the end product...which I think we did.  Or any other opinions.  Please.

Thanks.  :smile:  (It will still be gone in a trice)

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Did you cook the nougat to 311F as Greweling recommends? When I used his recipe and cooked to 311F, the nougat came out much harder than I like. I routinely use Greweling's recipe, but cook it to 280-290F and the consistency is excellent. I give a temperature range, because I cook to a higher temperature when the weather is more humid, lower temperature when the humidity is low. When the weather is humid, my nougat tends to be softer so I cook to a higher temperature. Maybe humidity is why your batch was softer when you made it last summer.

Maybe, someone else can comment on whether I'm crazy about my humidity observations and how I deal with them.

#69 Darienne

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 03:37 PM

Did you cook the nougat to 311F as Greweling recommends?  When I used his recipe and cooked to 311F, the nougat came out much harder than I like.  I routinely use Greweling's recipe, but cook it to 280-290F and the consistency is excellent.  I give a temperature range, because I cook to a higher temperature when the weather is more humid, lower temperature when the humidity is low.  When the weather is humid, my nougat tends to be softer so I cook to a higher temperature.  Maybe humidity is why your batch was softer when you made it last summer.

Maybe, someone else can comment on whether I'm crazy about my humidity observations and how I deal with them.

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Thanks. OK....our humidity is very high right now in the 90s. O, the joys of the Ontario winter. The other bit is that I did not do the cooking or the checking at the time. However, partner Barb is very careful...far more than I am. :hmmm:

I guess I was curious as to whether overbeating could be the problem, because I do think it was beaten too long.

Still I am interested in your humidity considerations.

Edited by Darienne, 20 January 2009 - 03:39 PM.

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#70 Elle Bee

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:14 PM

Mint Meltaway Weirdness...

OK, so there's been some strange chocolate behavior on MY planet, and I'm wondering if this happens on any of YOUR planets....

First batch of Mint Meltaways from the Greweling book (one quarter recipe) turned out GREAT. Second batch (half recipe) melted just like the first, set up more slowly, and then crystallized in a way I've never seen -- like little tiny BB's of chocolate suspended in a solid (but more melty) chocolate/coconut base. Both the chocolate and coconut oil were fully melted when I combined them. The only difference in handling between the first and second batches is that I didn't try tabling the second batch -- I did try it with the first batch, but it was so fluid I ended up scraping it all back into the bowl, stirring until cool, and then pouring it into the pan. Any clues as to what's going on?

Meanwhile, as there was nothing to lose, I decided to experiment a bit. Remelted about a fourth of the set up mixture, added a cup of warm heavy cream, cooled it over some ice, and put it in my cream siphon. Then heated a mug of milk until hot, and gave it nice big swirl of aerated mint meltaway/cream mixture on top. That was tasty -- way too rich, but no regrets... :-)

I will try turning the rest of the batch back into what it was originally meant to be. Or maybe I'll do something else. Or maybe I will throw it out. Comments and ideas welcome.
Laurie Bergren

"Here let us feast, and to the feast be join'd discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind." Pope's Homer

#71 Kerry Beal

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 03:40 AM

Mint Meltaway Weirdness...

OK, so there's been some strange chocolate behavior on MY planet, and I'm wondering if this happens on any of YOUR planets....

First batch of Mint Meltaways from the Greweling book (one quarter recipe) turned out GREAT. Second batch (half recipe) melted just like the first, set up more slowly, and then crystallized in a way I've never seen -- like little tiny BB's of chocolate suspended in a solid (but more melty) chocolate/coconut base. Both the chocolate and coconut oil were fully melted when I combined them. The only difference in handling between the first and second batches is that I didn't try tabling the second batch -- I did try it with the first batch, but it was so fluid I ended up scraping it all back into the bowl, stirring until cool, and then pouring it into the pan. Any clues as to what's going on?

Meanwhile, as there was nothing to lose, I decided to experiment a bit. Remelted about a fourth of the set up mixture, added a cup of warm heavy cream, cooled it over some ice, and put it in my cream siphon. Then heated a mug of milk until hot, and gave it nice big swirl of aerated mint meltaway/cream mixture on top. That was tasty -- way too rich, but no regrets... :-)

I will try turning the rest of the batch back into what it was originally meant to be. Or maybe I'll do something else. Or maybe I will throw it out. Comments and ideas welcome.

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Remelt and cool over ice water until it starts to firm up on the edges. Take off the ice water and continue to stir until it's clear the mass is 'getting the message' then pour out.

It's like tempering chocolate - if you don't get the right crystals forming - you are out of temper.

One of my first batches was like that, and I was up north with my 18 inch round marble - which isn't going to let me slab a 1/2 batch of something that fluid, so I just poured it into the frame and waited. Ended up remelting and cooling over ice water.

Discussion of the meltaways starts on post #151 of this topic.

#72 Elle Bee

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Posted 22 January 2009 - 04:07 PM

.... and continue to stir until it's clear the mass is 'getting the message' then pour out.

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Ah! It's a communications issue! I will go clarify my intent to the surly slab and report back (mutters to self,"I am the boss of my confections, I am the boss of my confections, I am the boss...")

Thanks for the tip!
Edited to add...
HA! That worked a treat!!!! (considering changing user name to Elle BOSS....)


PS - I actually considered posting my question as a reply in that original meltaway thread, and then wasn't sure, since all the "conversation" there took place pretty much at the same time. I dithered back and forth on whether to post there or here -- would it have been preferable to put it with the previous discussion? (sorry if I screwed up.... :unsure: )

Edited by Elle Bee, 22 January 2009 - 05:03 PM.

Laurie Bergren

"Here let us feast, and to the feast be join'd discourse, the sweeter banquet of the mind." Pope's Homer

#73 cmflick

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:31 AM

Anyone have any tips on the best way to store nougat? I made a batch of Montelimar nougat using Greweling's recipe yesterday and it's the perfect texture. I'm only trying to store it as long as it takes to eat it, usually only a week or two, and I'd really like to maintain the texture that it has now!

Help please!

#74 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 January 2009 - 11:59 AM

Anyone have any tips on the best way to store nougat?  I made a batch of  Montelimar nougat using Greweling's recipe yesterday and it's the perfect texture.  I'm only trying to store it as long as it takes to eat it, usually only a week or two, and I'd really like to maintain the texture that it has now! 

Help please!

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I think an airtight container should be all you need.

#75 lebowits

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 08:48 AM

I'm looking for advice on making "Leaf Croquant". I remember successfully making this product when I took a class with Chef Greweling almost 3 years ago. In reviewing the formula and method, it seemed to come back to me as "medium" level of difficulty in execution.

Here is my problem. I have successfully made the almond nut "filling" and have that set aside. I have the ingredients measured out for the caramel and a set of rulers laid out in an approximately 12 x 12 inch rectangle. I cook the sugar and add the glucose off the heat once I've reached the "medium amber" color he recommends.

I pour the liquid caramel into the frame and it simply doesn't cover the entire surface inside the rulers before beginning to set. I've compared the quantities of the ingredients in both the book and the class notes/hand-outs and they match.

The only thing I can think of is that the surface under my silpat isn't temperature "neutral" and that the counter top is simply drawing away the heat too quickly.

Has anyone else executed this method? Do you have suggestions or advice?

Many thanks.
Steve Lebowitz
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#76 John DePaula

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 09:17 AM

I don't have any experience with this so I apologize if this suggestion doesn't help...

What if you place a "fluffy" kitchen towel on the counter top. Have a heavy flat cookie sheet, topped with a silpat, in the oven, preheated and ready to go when your caramel is ready. Then you can take it out and put it on the towel, which will help to insulate it. Quickly arrange your rulers and pour your caramel.

Hope this helps.
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#77 Beth Wilson

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Posted 23 February 2009 - 11:41 AM

I make many pans of toffee in the store and usually I heat up 2 or 3 pans then put them all on top of a few layers of towels. The towels help insulate the heat and the 2 pans under the pan I am working on, keep the heat a bit longer than just on top of the towels. Most times I just warm the oven to 170C, put the pans in and turn off the oven.

As soon as the toffee is spread evenly I take the top pan with the toffee and put it in my cooling racks, put the warmed trays back in the oven to make another batch of toffee.

Our kitchen is airconditioned and I find the pans cool too fast without the benefit of the warmed trays underneath.

#78 Tri2Cook

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 06:36 AM

@#%^... $@&%.... @!*#... :hmmm:

How the heck do people without guitars cut those PB&J's without the peanut butter gianduja breaking all to pieces? I followed his ratio exactly, mixed the tempered milk chocolate with the peanut butter, tabled it, poured it over the PDF and let it set. It now is like trying to chop a block of tempered chocolate rather than slicing like a ganache. It just snaps and breaks all over the place. I'm thinking next time I'll skip the tempering and tabling and just mix melted chocolate and peanut butter and maybe increase the PB a bit. The PB flavor is a bit muted behind the PDF and the dark chocolate I dipped the few decent surviving pieces in.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#79 Lior

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:04 AM

Well I had a similar experience. I made a white chocolate with praline paste and cocoa nibs- so it is sort of like gianduja with cocoa nibs. I borrowed my friends guitar cause I really suck at cutting. I couldn't cut through it! I didn't try too hard as I didnot want to snap a string. I used untempered to foot but the foot was too thick. I think that and the nibs caused a problem. Back to cutting by hand, crumbling feet and frustration.

#80 Chris Hennes

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 03:18 PM

It's been a while since I've done any chocolate work, but I think it's time to get started back up: to that end, I have a question about the "Madras"—how strong is the curry flavor? I'll be sending these into work with my wife, and this is Oklahoma: not exactly the land of adventurous eaters. These things sound good to me, but, well...

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#81 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 03:23 PM

It's been a while since I've done any chocolate work, but I think it's time to get started back up: to that end, I have a question about the "Madras"—how strong is the curry flavor? I'll be sending these into work with my wife, and this is Oklahoma: not exactly the land of adventurous eaters. These things sound good to me, but, well...

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I tasted these in Germany -made by schneich - they were wonderful. Just the right amount of curry to make them tasty. But I'd start with a small batch given your audience.

#82 patris

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 04:40 PM

It's been a while since I've done any chocolate work, but I think it's time to get started back up: to that end, I have a question about the "Madras"—how strong is the curry flavor? I'll be sending these into work with my wife, and this is Oklahoma: not exactly the land of adventurous eaters. These things sound good to me, but, well...

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I made these with garam masala instead of curry powder - I couldn't find a mix without garlic and/or onions, and I couldn't stomach the idea of either of those combined with chocolate. I'm one of those not-exactly-adventurous eaters, for sure. They were great with the garam masala, though. Crazy fragrant and delicious.
Patty

#83 Chris Hennes

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 05:55 PM

Made the Madras today: it's been a while and took some time to get back into the groove of dipping. Overall, the recipe is OK, in my opinion. Not great, I doubt I will make it again, but OK. I am a bit worried that it will be too much for my wife's co-workers tomorrow, however. We shall see...

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#84 Kerry Beal

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 06:08 PM

What did you not like about it Chris?

#85 Chris Hennes

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 06:12 PM

The taste. :raz:

OK, on a more serious note: it's not that I dislike them, I just like every single other confection I've made from this book better. The lingering curry flavor at the end, in particular, bothered me a bit. I'm sure I could play around with different curry powders to achieve a better effect (when making curries I don't usually even use the bottled stuff... why did I start now?), but I don't think this one is worth the trouble of experimenting to get it "right"—it's never going to taste as good (to me) as the PB&Js or the Habanos.

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#86 Tri2Cook

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Posted 29 March 2009 - 07:21 PM

Nice Chris! Why is it when everyone else is complaining about their dipping, they still look better than mine on a good day? :blink: I actually had that recipe (along with the habanos and a couple others) bookmarked to try but hadn't got around to it yet. Maybe I'll just mix up a small batch of the ganache first and make sure I don't fall on the "yuck" side of the fence.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#87 bdonaghy

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Posted 30 March 2009 - 05:58 AM

The taste.  :raz:

OK, on a more serious note: it's not that I dislike them, I just like every single other confection I've made from this book better. The lingering curry flavor at the end, in particular, bothered me a bit. I'm sure I could play around with different curry powders to achieve a better effect (when making curries I don't usually even use the bottled stuff... why did I start now?), but I don't think this one is worth the trouble of experimenting to get it "right"—it's never going to taste as good (to me) as the PB&Js or the Habanos.

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For what it's worth . . . curry is a "hard" flavor to get right. Different spice blends taste different and therefore will be different. I think you hit it on the head, if you wanted to nail this recipe it's about developing your own spice blend to highlight the flavors you want to see in the finished piece. However, I disagree that coming up with a good chocolate curry recipe isn't worth the effort, in my world curry is far superior to PB&J. LOL

#88 CKatCook

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Posted 09 December 2009 - 06:25 PM

I am in the process of reading through the whole thread, but I am eagar to get started now that I am all geared up, but now I am wondering, how does one cut down the size of the formulas? I understand they are in percentages, but I am not that math savey to work them out, or if some one could clue me in on how the percentages work?

I am just now starting to read the book, even though I had it for a while now, I just got hooked on bread. :rolleyes:
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#89 CKatCook

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 04:41 AM

ok, you can all flog me with a stupid stick...I figured it out. :blush:
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#90 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 05:44 AM

ok, you can all flog me with a stupid stick...I figured it out. :blush:

I'm so glad - I started to answer - then realized I'm not capable of explaining that in print.