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What's on your menu for dessert?

Dessert

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45 replies to this topic

#31 nightscotsman

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 01:03 AM

I just wanted to resurect this thread to mention I tried the Jean-Georges warm, liquid center chocolate cake recipe tonight. I know it's a dessert cliche, but damn if it wasn't really, really good, as well as very fast and easy to make (if you have all the ingredients you can be eating it within about a half hour of opening the cookbook, but you can also make the batter several hours ahead of time, pour into molds, and just bake off when you want to serve the cakes). I got the recipe from the "Jean-Georges: Cooking at home with a Four-Star Chef" book, but it's also available on-line here: http://www.wchstv.co...ftchocola.shtml

Other recipes I've seen involve inserting a cold chocolate truffle into the batter before baking, but this one just uses a very simple, rich batter baked briefly at a high temperature to acheive the soft center. Has anybody else made a version of this cake that they recommend?

#32 chefette

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 07:44 AM

Thanks Night. I actually owe this thread some info myself. I did make the Banana Nougatine napoleon (well, some version of it anyway) finally.

As I mentioned earlier, looking over the recipe carefully I thought that it was way too complicated.

I made banana Brazilnut nougatine sheets.
Toast 4 oz brazilnuts in the oven and allow to cool
Grind with 1 container Just Bananas (2oz?) try to maintain a non-paste consistency
Caramelize 500g sugar in a heavy pan and add 2 oz butter
pour out the caramel onto a large silpat to cool
break up the caramel and grind it toi a powder
sprinkle a layer of caramel powder onto a silpat and then sprinkle with the banana nut mixture, and top with a dusting of the caramel powder
score with the bak of a knife into rectangles
place in a 325 degree oven until the caramel melts (just a minute or two)
allow to cool slightly and peel off the silpat

I also made the sugar macaroons using Sucanat (a natural cane sugar)
I stuck pretty much to the recipe from the Bras book on that. You then are supposed to gring these macaroons up and use them as the base of the yogurt cream filling. I was not that keen on the filling or the macaroons.

I really liked the nougatine though.

#33 Michael Laiskonis

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 08:04 AM

I also made the sugar macaroons using Sucanat (a natural cane sugar).

I remember using this stuff in my 'vegan' days. chefette, have you used it often in pastry work? Do you have any thoughts on how it behaves and where it might be useful?
Michael Laiskonis
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#34 nightscotsman

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 11:03 AM

That nougatine sounds really good - I may have to give it a try. Based on the recipe on page 186, yes?

Edit: I just took another look at the Bras recipe, and not only is it complicated, it doesn't actually make sense. :hmmm: He says to spread the caramel and banana pate sablee mixture out on a silpat, but then he moves on to spreading the nougatine between parchment sheets and heating it in the oven - never again mentioning the banana mixture. Are they supposed to be combined in some way? Something is either missing or wasn't translated properly here.

Edited by nightscotsman, 10 February 2003 - 12:11 PM.


#35 chefette

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 03:21 PM

Michael, this was my first use of sucanat. I had it around for a while waiting for something to try it with.

It isn't moist or fine grained like brown sugars. It is dry and fairly coarse. It might actually work out if you ground it up more finely in a food processor. The flavor was very assertive. I am not sure what I would use it for. Not sure it was ideal for this use.

Night... In the Bras recipe he dries bananas then mashes them up with water to make banana butter, The banana butter is used to make a banana sable. The banana sable is ground up into the nougatine. My reaction to all of this was that it was a ridiculous waste of time. This leads me to believe that he was rummaging around in the pastry kitchen one evening just robbing the poor pastry chef of all sorts of things to toss into his misguided dessert.

Looking over all this I thought - so, you wanted a banana nougatine - let's just make that then and skip all this other crapola.

And yes, the whole, make the hot caramel and spred it out and roll it between two silpats thing has never ever worked that well for me. I have to say that I would really be interested in seeing someone actually do that and actually produce nice paper thin pieces of nougatine as pictured on page 186. I did try it the rolling out way and had some moderate success, but really thought it was way more work that it was worth.

Seems like a good job to save to punish someone with.

#36 Varmint

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 03:54 PM

I just wanted to resurect this thread to mention I tried the Jean-Georges warm, liquid center chocolate cake recipe tonight. I know it's a dessert cliche, but damn if it wasn't really, really good, as well as very fast and easy to make

NSM-
Yeah, it is a cliche, but in these parts, it's a cliche that works very well. It's so damn easy and it's a good dish to get guests involved in the preparation, if you're so inclined. I serve it with different flavors of whipped cream (I like making a mint whipped cream), or a simple creme anglaise. Plus, you can make the batter in advance. You can also make this a bit more complex by putting homemade truffles in the center, so you have two very different flavors in the same dish.
Dean McCord
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#37 kitwilliams

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 05:33 PM

I was just gifted with Nick Malgieri's Perfect Cakes and currently have his Chocolate Pound Cake in the oven. I knew just from looking at the recipe that it would not be the deep, dark chocolatey cake I am looking for (remembering one from La Farine in Oakland) as there are only 4 oz. semi-sweet to 3c. flour/2c. sugar/8oz. butter. Very milk-chocolatey looking. I baked a tad of the batter in a brioche mold so that I could taste it sooner (!) and it is very good but not what I dream of. Will try adding some cocoa powder next time. Any other recommendations will be appreciated. :biggrin:

And regarding Nick's book, has anyone made the Capriccio Alle Nocciole (hazelnut cake from Ticino) on page 166? There is a bit of a discrepancy: in list of ingredients it calls for 1 cup sugar however he adds 6 Tbsp. of sugar to the butter and the "remaining" 6 Tbsp. to the egg whites. Can't find the other 4 Tbsp. Does he really mean only 12 Tbsp. of sugar or do you think it should be 8 Tbsp. each to the butter and egg white mixtures. I know it is not a large amount but I of course want it to be perfect, not too sweet or not sweet enough!

Thanks! Sweets to the Sweet and the Not-So-Sweet!
kit

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#38 gknl

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 06:09 PM

I made Stephanie Zonis' Double chocolate pumpkin cake for my parents to take to a Super Bowl party. It's baked in a tube pan, but is very rich and moist, more like a layer cake in texture. It calls for 6 oz unsweetened chocolate, 1/4 cup cocoa, and a cup of pumpkin puree which you can't taste at all. PM me for the recipe.

#39 Michael Laiskonis

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 10:49 PM

In the Bras recipe...


I too wanted to give this a go, in fact, because of the complex method for the nougatine. I only have the French edition; the nougatine process seemed straightforward enough, but what stumped me was the 'bananes déshydatées'. No idea what kind of product Bras was using, I went ahead and ordered five pounds of those thick dried banana slices. By the first step, the 'pâte de banane', it didn't feel right, and I got busy with other things, so the project has been shelved since the Fall. I still have four and a half pounds of dried bananas... I'd still like to give it a go according to the Bras method, as well as adapt the Adria 'caramelo' technique, incorporating the banana into the sugar, or even swapping the ingredients- a yogurt powder 'nougatine/caramelo' with a banana-based cream...

But my question, for chefette... I'm not familiar with Just Banana. What is it?
Michael Laiskonis
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#40 wingding

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 03:11 AM

Michael,if this is useful to you-take a medium ripe banana or two,put em in a robot coupe.Strain,and spread the puree very thinly and evenly on silpat.Dry out in a low oven-you will have beautiful,shape-able pieces of crispy banana.

#41 chefette

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 07:34 AM

Hi Michael, I actually used a product called "Just Bananas" which seem to be some sort of flash freeze dried banana slices. They do not seem dessicated or tough in any way. They make a really great powder but are sort of expensive - a pint size container (2.5 oz) cost about $4 but they really pack alot of flavor so a little goes a long way.

If you go through his whole process let me know how it works.

It just seemed to me that unless you were using making and using most of the items (dried bananas, banana butter, banana sable, sugar macaroons) he tosses into this recipe in other desserts so had a stock of them on hand it makes this a pretty expensive offering.

The nougatine I produced was really tasty, has a nice banana taste, and is pleasantly easy to snap. It is really tasty with chocolate fudge cake and caramel mousse.

#42 Michael Laiskonis

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 09:43 PM

Michael,if this is useful to you-take a medium ripe banana or two,put em in a robot coupe.Strain,and spread the puree very thinly and evenly on silpat.Dry out in a low oven-you will have beautiful,shape-able pieces of crispy banana.

We've done a bit of this before. I like to add a little egg white as well, to aid in the drying process. I've had success with mango, melon, plum, and apricot, to name a few. I'm big on fruit chips!

chefette, while I like some of the dessert ideas/components in the Bras book, I don't think they are as strong as the savory ones. Have you played with anything else from there?
Michael Laiskonis
Pastry Chef
New York
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#43 Saffy

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 02:50 AM

I love desserts! as my increasingly voluptuous figure illustrates.
This evening for dessert we had a nectarine and raspberry tart - delicious.

Tomorrow I have a chocolate chestnut cake planned :smile:

#44 Patrice

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 08:09 AM

Michael-I recently tried 2 recipes from Michel Bras: the gaufrette and the bread nougatine ( the one with rhubarb). The gaufrettes are incredible. they are very thin and they crack with just a touch from the fork. I used them for a chocolate mille-feuilles ( 6 gaufrettes with chocolate cream in between in layers.
The bread nougatine didn't convince me as much. I will have to give it another try... :hmmm:
Patrice Demers

#45 bripastryguy

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 08:13 AM

Patrice ,

can you give the recipe for the gaufretts>

How is the restaurant coming along?

Brian
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
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#46 Patrice

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Posted 12 February 2003 - 08:17 AM

I don't have the recipe with me right now but I will post it later...
The restaurant is going very well. The designer has completed the drawings and we are starting the ''real'' work next week!!!
Patrice Demers





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