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Drinks! (2013 Part 2)


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#31 Rafa

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 08:39 PM

 

Rafa has much to answer for, the bounder.  Last night we had his The Man Comes Around again.  It was so good we then had to have another one ...

Trifecta of spousal abhorrence: Mezcal, Spanish brandy, Fernet Branca. We're having it tonight.... ;)

 

 

I refuse to take any blame for you foisting this on your spouse.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#32 EvergreenDan

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 04:12 AM

The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy. 


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#33 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 12:14 PM

The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy. 

So, what did you wife think about it? 

 

While I was enjoying a Kingston Negroni I made another awful realization - I had not made a proper Manhattan in months! (the desperation Manhattan I had to make at a recent party that had a do-it-yourself bar using Canadian Club whiskey does NOT count...). So that's what I ended up making for my husband. Rittenhouse rye, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Jerry Thomas' decanter bitters, brandied cherry.

 

10200149633_e359c4579b_z.jpg
 


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#34 Rafa

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:15 PM

 

The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy. 

So, what did you wife think about it? 

 

Don't leave us hanging. Has she recovered?

 

I'm gratified by all the enjoyment that many of you are getting out of this drink, by the way. It's idiosyncratic but it hits a lot of my sweet (or bitter) spots and I'm glad it hits yours too. 
 

Oh, right, thread topic. Many nights of many Martinis for me (Broker's, Dolin, Regan's, lemon twist), plus a few things I'm working on for this month's MxMo. And I just bought a bottle of glorious manzanilla, so I'm looking forward to a weekend of sherry cocktails. I think I'll start with a Bamboo.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#35 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:10 PM

End of the Road: eq. parts Laphroaig, Chartruese and Campari.


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#36 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:45 PM



The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy.

So, what did you wife think about it?
 
Don't leave us hanging. Has she recovered?
Looks like they are no longer on speaking terms.
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#37 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:47 PM

End of the Road: eq. parts Laphroaig, Chartruese and Campari.

Thanks for mentioning it on the beta cocktail thread a while back. It's an interesting cocktail for sure.

#38 EvergreenDan

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 07:11 PM

 

 

 

The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy.

So, what did you wife think about it?
 
Don't leave us hanging. Has she recovered?
Looks like they are no longer on speaking terms.

 

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;) 


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#39 lesliec

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:45 PM

 

 

 

 

The Man Comes Around is brilliant, although I used cognac as I had no Spanish brandy.

So, what did you wife think about it?
 
Don't leave us hanging. Has she recovered?
Looks like they are no longer on speaking terms.

 

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;) 

 

 

It is an unspeakably good drink.

 

Yesterday was Aethercon 2013, the biggest day on the Wellington steampunk calendar.  After the festivities, six of us (in full costume, much to the befuddlement of other patrons) went over to the Hawthorn Lounge, where four of us felt it would be appropriate to order Rusty Automatons (rye, bourbon, Cherry Heering, mole bitters) .  If you know anything at all about steampunk you'll probably appreciate why that's so appropriate.  If you don't ... in brief, us steampunks like automatons and dirigibles and ray guns and stuff.  Anyway, it's a nice drink.  More or less rust-coloured, nicely balanced.  From somewhere, about five minutes in, I started getting a taste of coconut.  Surprising but good.

 

It was even more appropriate because the drink was created by Jonny Almario, who used to work at Hawthorn a few years back.


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#40 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:00 PM

The jalapeno julep from Edward Lee's new-ish cookbook, Smoke & Pickles.

 

A half dozen mint leaves muddled w/ 1 oz jalapeno-infused simple (add a couple of chopped jalapenos to a cup each of sugar and water, bring to boil, set aside for 20 minutes) and 2.5 oz bourbon. Crushed ice. Topped up with a bit of soda water. 


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#41 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:38 AM

These are some drinks we enjoyed recently at the Zetter Townhouse in Clerkenwell. Original recipes are devised by Tony Conigliaro.

 

Negroni for my friend. He called this pretty standard and had some better ones in the Negroni Bar at Polpo restaurant later on... and after that, some superb barrel-aged specimens with mixed vermouths at Shoreditch House. He knows what he likes to drink.

 

031 (480x640).jpg

 

Flintlock for me. I was a little insulted when the waitress warned me that this was 'a strong drink' and asked whether I was sure I wanted it... Guess I looked either fragile or already drunk. Anyway, it's listed as containing:

 

Beefeater 24 gin, gunpowder tea tincture, sugar, dandelion & burdock bitters & Fernet Branca 

 

The Fernet Branca was hard to detect; perhaps the waitress wished to spare me the shock. The drink tasted of sugar and absinthe.

 

You also get a small gun cotton blast to top off your drink.

 

032 (480x640).jpg

 

El Presidente for my friend, which totally knocked him out and compelled him to drink another.

 

033 (480x640).jpg

 

Richmond for me.

 

Chivas Regal 12yr, apple honey & Lillet blanc

 

034 (480x640).jpg

 

It was simple and delicate. Nice for a rainy afternoon.

 

Later I ended up back there again for some Koln Martinis with Adam George, which we both could have enjoyed if I hadn't spilled most of mine into his man-bag. The waitress spritzes the citrus aromatics over your glass at the table.

 

This bar is really comfortable and a nice place to relax early in the evening. The decor is country house library-themed so it's not the place to go insane with your liquor. Music is innocuous blues. 

 

That's not Michael Stipe in the background by the way, not matter what you think.


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 13 October 2013 - 11:58 AM.

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#42 Rafa

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

That's not Michael Stipe in the background by the way, not matter what you think.

 

I think I thought I saw him try.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#43 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 03:39 PM

 

That's not Michael Stipe in the background by the way, not matter what you think.

 

I think I thought I saw him try.

 

 

He did, but I slapped his face. We shared a cigarette later so it's all cool.


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#44 Chris Amirault

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 04:20 PM

Gabriel's Nurse, after Gabriel Byrne and, you know....

2 oz Irish whiskey
3/4 oz MB creme de cacao
1/2 oz rich demerara syrup
2 Angostura
2 oz milk
grate of nutmeg

Shake; strain over ice in an OF glass; grate the nutmeg over the top.
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#45 campus five

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 09:14 PM

Los Angeles has dipped into the 60's, which means it's now fall.

I went for a Manhattan, but swapped 1/2 the rye for some Apple Brandy. It was exactly what I was looking for.
1 oz. Rittenhouse
1 oz. Laird's BIB Apple Brandy
1 oz. Carpano Antica
2 dashes Miracle Mile Forbidden Bitters

Lemon Peel.

I could've sworn a 1/2 rye, 1/2 apple jack manhattan had a name. Oh well, it's doesn't need a name - it's just needs to be the right time of year, and this is it.
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#46 Adam George

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 09:30 PM

These are some drinks we enjoyed recently at the Zetter Townhouse in Clerkenwell. Original recipes are devised by Tony Conigliaro.

 

Negroni

some superb barrel-aged specimens with mixed vermouths at Shoreditch House. He knows what he likes to drink.

 

 

 

Flintlock for me. I was a little insulted when the waitress warned me that this was 'a strong drink' and asked whether I was sure I wanted it... Guess I looked either fragile or already drunk. Anyway, it's listed as containing:

 

 

 

 

 

Later I ended up back there again for some Koln Martinis with Adam George, which we both could have enjoyed if I hadn't spilled most of mine into his man-bag. The waitress spritzes the citrus aromatics over your glass at the table.

 

This bar is really comfortable and a nice place to relax early in the evening. The decor is country house library-themed so it's not the place to go insane with your liquor. Music is innocuous blues. 

 

 

 

 

Shoreditch House has got very WankMixology since I was there.  Funny....

 

 

I've been a different bar and had the waiter tell my female companion a drink was "strong".  
I put it down to staff training, really.  I trained my staff previously to refer to drinks as either "spirit forward" or "easy drinking" rather than "strong" and "light".

I really would like to see more effort put into training floor staff at decent cocktail bars.  

 

 

I like the Koln Martini, but was expecting more of a unique flavour profile.  I'd give it a go again when less tired, I think.

 

Overall, Zetter is lovely bar and well worth a detour.


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#47 haresfur

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:10 PM

 

These are some drinks we enjoyed recently at the Zetter Townhouse in Clerkenwell. Original recipes are devised by Tony Conigliaro.

 

Negroni

some superb barrel-aged specimens with mixed vermouths at Shoreditch House. He knows what he likes to drink.

 

 

 

Flintlock for me. I was a little insulted when the waitress warned me that this was 'a strong drink' and asked whether I was sure I wanted it... Guess I looked either fragile or already drunk. Anyway, it's listed as containing:

 

 

 

 

 

Later I ended up back there again for some Koln Martinis with Adam George, which we both could have enjoyed if I hadn't spilled most of mine into his man-bag. The waitress spritzes the citrus aromatics over your glass at the table.

 

This bar is really comfortable and a nice place to relax early in the evening. The decor is country house library-themed so it's not the place to go insane with your liquor. Music is innocuous blues. 

 

 

 

 

Shoreditch House has got very WankMixology since I was there.  Funny....

 

 

I've been a different bar and had the waiter tell my female companion a drink was "strong".  
I put it down to staff training, really.  I trained my staff previously to refer to drinks as either "spirit forward" or "easy drinking" rather than "strong" and "light".

I really would like to see more effort put into training floor staff at decent cocktail bars.  

 

Wrong on many levels.  Did the waiter look at you and think you were not to be trusted?  Then again the dangerous drinks are strong and easy drinking.


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#48 Adam George

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:11 AM

That's true.

The Zombie falls into the Strong yet Easy Drinking category - My favourite.


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#49 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 09:51 AM

 

 

These are some drinks we enjoyed recently at the Zetter Townhouse in Clerkenwell. Original recipes are devised by Tony Conigliaro.

 

Negroni

some superb barrel-aged specimens with mixed vermouths at Shoreditch House. He knows what he likes to drink.

 

 

 

Flintlock for me. I was a little insulted when the waitress warned me that this was 'a strong drink' and asked whether I was sure I wanted it... Guess I looked either fragile or already drunk. Anyway, it's listed as containing:

 

 

 

 

 

Later I ended up back there again for some Koln Martinis with Adam George, which we both could have enjoyed if I hadn't spilled most of mine into his man-bag. The waitress spritzes the citrus aromatics over your glass at the table.

 

This bar is really comfortable and a nice place to relax early in the evening. The decor is country house library-themed so it's not the place to go insane with your liquor. Music is innocuous blues. 

 

 

 

 

Shoreditch House has got very WankMixology since I was there.  Funny....

 

 

I've been a different bar and had the waiter tell my female companion a drink was "strong".  
I put it down to staff training, really.  I trained my staff previously to refer to drinks as either "spirit forward" or "easy drinking" rather than "strong" and "light".

I really would like to see more effort put into training floor staff at decent cocktail bars.  

 

Wrong on many levels.  Did the waiter look at you and think you were not to be trusted?  Then again the dangerous drinks are strong and easy drinking.

 

 

If she thought I was not to be trusted.... well, she was probably right :wink:



#50 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 12:56 PM

 

Flintlock for me. I was a little insulted when the waitress warned me that this was 'a strong drink' and asked whether I was sure I wanted it... Guess I looked either fragile or already drunk.

 

I've been a different bar and had the waiter tell my female companion a drink was "strong".
I put it down to staff training, really. I trained my staff previously to refer to drinks as either "spirit forward" or "easy drinking" rather than "strong" and "light".

I really would like to see more effort put into training floor staff at decent cocktail bars.

 

So used to this. Here people warn you if the beer is sour, if the cocktail is bitter, contains a raw egg, etc... They will even take your wine glass away if you are a woman and seem pregnant...

 

No such nonsense at the Sycamore Den. This relatively new bar in Normal Heights looks like your dad's man cave in the 70s, complete with wood paneling, banjo, shotgun collection, and period-appropriate music selection. Kind of fun although somewhat crowded (as expected) & loud on a Saturday night.

 

Too busy hipster-watching, I opted not to take photos. Eric Johnson formerly of Noble Experiment designed the cocktail menu. I had a Swiss Bank, a mild daiquiri tempered by pineapple juice and a touch of absinthe, Swiss-Mist like (but with rum). It would have been a more logical choice for my first drink (starting with something subtle) but instead I went for the Dovetail Julep, a great rendition with gin & cognac, a hint of peach from the bitters and more of that Kubler absinthe. It looked like a snow cone piled into a little tin camping mug. Really nice. Also a Monk Improved, an improved cocktail with Maraschino & Chartreuse.

 

It will be good to go back on a weeknight when things are a little calmer.


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#51 Rafa

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:27 PM

 

 

That's not Michael Stipe in the background by the way, not matter what you think.

 

I think I thought I saw him try.

 

 

He did, but I slapped his face. We shared a cigarette later so it's all cool.

 

 

 

So you're the reason his voice was wrecked on his last few records. (I have written several thousands words on R.E.M. My secret shame.)

 

Edit: Accidental double post. Made the most of it.


Edited by Rafa, 14 October 2013 - 01:30 PM.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#52 Rafa

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:28 PM

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;) 

 

 

Maybe I should rename it the Overshare. :) Well, we did ask...

 

Recently I enjoyed a Holidays Away at Pouring Ribbons. With Islay Scotch, honey syrup, lemon peel, Unicum, and a touch of Bénédictine, it's like a bittered, aromatic take on a Penicillin. Highly recommended, if that sounds appealing.


Edited by Rafa, 14 October 2013 - 01:30 PM.

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#53 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 04:33 PM

 

Aphrodisiac. No speaking needed. ;) 

 

 

Maybe I should rename it the Overshare. :) Well, we did ask...

 

 

I was going to say that I'll have what she's having, but am very unfortunately sans Cynar at the moment.

This week is not starting well at all.

 

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

 

10259887543_d6a6912c39_z.jpg
 


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 14 October 2013 - 04:36 PM.

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#54 Tri2Cook

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 04:54 PM

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#55 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 05:00 PM

 

Anyway, back to the weekend fun. Tried a De La Louisiane and its diametric opposite, Michael Madrusan's Deep Blue Sea - light, crisp and slightly salty. If you have a bottle of violette languishing somewhere, give it a try.

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.

 

Here you go - http://www.lcbo.com/...331&language=EN



#56 Tri2Cook

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 06:06 PM

Thanks Kerry! When'd they do that? If I'm not thinking of something else, the last I saw, they had that on the online order thing for like $80... which I was unwilling to pay. Didn't know they moved it into regular stock and cut the price in half.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#57 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 06:10 PM

Not sure - saw it in Sudbury the other day of all places! 



#58 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:44 AM

 

 

I guess I'll add that one to the list of others I have lined up to try if the LCBO ever decides to bring in a violette.

 

Here you go - http://www.lcbo.com/...331&language=EN

 

 

Isn't crème Yvette a bit different from crème de violette though? From what I read, it's more berry and vanilla-forward and may not be a good substitute. See for example kindredcocktails and imbibe magazine.



#59 sbumgarner

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:20 AM


Isn't crème Yvette a bit different from crème de violette though? From what I read, it's more berry and vanilla-forward and may not be a good substitute. See for example kindredcocktails and imbibe magazine.

 

 

Most definitely - for better or worse depending on the application, Creme Yvette is much subtler with the violet. You can use a lot more Creme Yvette without overwhelming the cocktail, where as is most cases more than a quarter ounce of creme de violette turns your drink into perfume.



#60 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:40 AM

That's right. There is this comparison below from Erik in the Creme Yvette thread, and this detailed one which concludes that creme de violette is preferred for classic cocktails, although Yvette may work in some cases. But keep in mind that intensity, taste, and even color (Yvette has a reddish tinge) are different.

 

They're pretty different liqueurs.

The Rothman & Winter Violet is pretty single notedly Violet and not particularly sweet. Unless you really like Violet, it needs to be deployed with some care, as its intense violet flavor can easily overwhelm the other elements of a drink.

The Cooper Creme Yvette has some Violet, but also elements of berry fruits and Citrus. I don't have a lot of experience mixing with it. Having a hard time justifying buying another bottle of Violet liqueur for the house. I probably already have more than I will use in this lifetime.

Parfait Amour (depending on the brand) is Citrus with some Violet notes, but ultimately most people compare the flavor of the Brizard Parfait Amour to something like Grape Jelly Beans or another artificially flavored fruit candy. It also needs to be deployed with care in cocktails.