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WSJ on Schmaltz: Ruhlman's book


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7 replies to this topic

#1 rotuts

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 01:28 PM

http://online.wsj.co...YWORDS=schmaltz

 

interesting to look at.

 

Ive enjoyed all of Ruhlman's books

 

Ill get this from the Lib.

 

cant stand Ck Fat though, but understand its importance historically.

 

BTW Ruhlman's early book on being a student at the CIA  ( the tasty one ) I found facinating.

 

esp. the part on the Snow Storm.

 

F.D.  I actually had Lunch at the CIA in a previous Century.   :rolleyes:


Edited by rotuts, 07 September 2013 - 02:00 PM.


#2 rotuts

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 10:38 AM

i guess as a 'review'  Im allowed to post a few quotes?

 

"For the uninitiated, schmaltz is the German word for lard, the melted fat—usually pork, but occasionally goose, duck or chicken—used in cooking and baking. It was also, among the peasantry of bygone days, used as a cheap alternative to "buttering" one's bread. As one of countless German loan words that found its way into medieval Yiddish, schmaltz came to mean chicken fat since, under Mosaic law, pork fat was taboo. For stetl dwellers in Russia, Poland and Ukraine, the humble chicken was often the only affordable protein source, both in egg and poultry form. When Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe made their way to America, they brought their taste for schmaltz with them."

 

and

 

"Mr. Ruhlman declares in his introduction: "Fat doesn't make us fat—eating too much makes us fat. Eating all that processed crap, and cleaning our overfilled plates at chain restaurants, makes us fat. Lack of vigorous exercise makes us fat. The truth is, our bodies need fat."

 

etc.


Edited by rotuts, 08 September 2013 - 10:39 AM.


#3 Lisa Shock

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 02:04 AM

Some of it is misleading. Beans and nuts, especially when combined with grains, are also affordable protein sources, probably THE most affordable sources.

 

Until factory farming post WW2, chicken was one of the most expensive meats, thus recipes for 'city chicken' made from veal, which was cheaper and far more plentiful. Chickens have to be carefully cared for and fed. They were generally kept by farmers for the eggs, and only killed and eaten when old and beyond laying, many medieval peasants did not have the resources to run their own chicken coops. Meanwhile, the medieval peasant had streams and oceans full of fish, forests full of game, and plenty of assorted rodents readily available. (we have Roman recipes for mice)

 

But, the medieval diet for rich and poor alike was governed by the principle of balancing 'humors' and most often consisted of grain-based gruel with various flavorings depending upon a person's health. They boiled everything into these gruels, including vegetables like lettuce, eating very little, if anything, raw. They cooked in pots over the home hearth, home ovens were rare signs of wealth. (The home stove and oven are an invention of the 1800s) An average peasant family took their raw loaves to the village baker to be baked for a fee. That baker would cook other dishes as well, but, doing so cost a family dearly. (boulangere potatoes evolved as one of those type dishes, obviously post Columbus)

 

I am not a fan of Mr. Ruhlman, btw. My 'last straw' with him was his blog post, since deleted, where he quite seriously quoted Eric Ripert stating that it is a well known fact that women are inferior as chefs because it is impossible for a menstruating woman to make mayonnaise without it breaking. He only withdrew the post a week later following video demonstrations by several female bloggers (one wasn't enough to convince him) creating perfect, unbroken mayonnaises while 'Aunt Flo' was visiting.


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#4 rotuts

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 06:48 AM

didnt know that about Ruhlman.  wow.



#5 annabelle

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:08 AM

Sorry, Ruhlman.  Fat makes us fat.  It is more than twice as calorie dense as carbohydrates and proteins at  9.5: 4 Kcalories per gram.



#6 rotuts

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:21 AM

eat 1/3d as much then and loose weight!

 

calories make us fat.


Edited by rotuts, 10 September 2013 - 07:22 AM.


#7 annabelle

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:36 AM

Well, too many calories make us fat rotuts.  No calories make us dead.



#8 rotuts

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 09:50 AM

so .....  its not the fat .... but the calories .....

 

:raz:

 

Its A Joke !  sort of ...


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