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Chefs - As Tough As Elite Athletes


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#31 annabelle

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 12:55 PM

You are more likely successful and have stable relationships in your life, Tri 2.



#32 pastrygirl

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 07:30 PM

Oh we're tough all right, but we're not elite athletes. I recently got an activity tracker because I was curious to see how many calories I actually expend in a day. I feel like I'm constantly running for 9-12 hours a day and am generally exhausted by the end of a shift. But it turns out that even though I'm constantly moving, it's not intense athleticism. Over an average work day, I walk about 5 miles (back and forth to the oven, dish pit, etc) and climb 40 or 50 flights of stairs (walk-in and dry storage both upstairs from the kitchen) but have fewer than 10 "very active" minutes, with 5-6+ hours of light activity and 3-4+ hours of moderate activity.

#33 lizztwozee

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 11:33 AM

So chefs, I'm looking for some solutions to upper and mid-back pain, having to do with lifting, and being tipped at the waist so much, baking. Any yoga moves come to mind? I recently read an article about Yotam Ottolenghi, and how he had typical "bending over the stove" back pain, which he solved with yoga stretches . . . but the article (in the New Yorker) didn't mention which stretches he practiced. Maybe some core-strengthening would help? Any personal experiences out there? Thanks in advance.


Lizz

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#34 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:10 PM

Chefs as tough as elite athletes?

The title of this thread brought to mind visions of Mario Batali pole vaulting!..... Nah!!! No way!!!  :shock:

Most chefs that I know tend to be quite ambitious...some are tough....some not so much. None pole vault!  :blink:


~Martin
 
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#35 annabelle

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 01:28 PM

The Executive Chef that I used to work for confided in me that at his age (I believe he was not quite 50 then), he felt that he had destroyed his body by cooking for so many years.  He had bad knees, a bad back and terrible migraines most of the time.  He had in fact stopped working the line at all and was creating menus and trying to find something else to do with the rest of his days.

 

If felt sorry for him.  He had spent so much time devoted to his career that he had neglected his family and his health. 



#36 David Hensley

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 02:04 PM

Personally, I swear by aspirin. Not tylenol, not aleve, but real, pure aspirin. For some reason, it eases the pain far, far better than any other pain reliever I've tried.


I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...


#37 annabelle

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 02:32 PM

It's better for you too, David.  Ibuprophen and the like will build up in your liver, and since you are a drinker, can send you to your reward sooner than you had planned.



#38 David Hensley

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 03:41 PM

I doubt there's much reward for me, of all people!  I do love real aspirin though, it cuts the pain quickly, and keeps it at bay, for a long while...

 

I also stretch my back several times a day, whenever I have a minute, as much as I can. I find that a little pain while stretching, saves me a good deal of pain later, ya know?


I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...


#39 annabelle

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 04:49 PM

Oh, come now.  There's hope for all of us.

 

I take aspirin, too.  Mainly because, as you say it works better and more importantly, all the other acetaminophen products make me vomit.  Literally.  Obviously, my stomach knows best since I've never gotten sick on aspirin. 



#40 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 04:51 PM

So chefs, I'm looking for some solutions to upper and mid-back pain, having to do with lifting, and being tipped at the waist so much, baking. Any yoga moves come to mind? I recently read an article about Yotam Ottolenghi, and how he had typical "bending over the stove" back pain, which he solved with yoga stretches . . . but the article (in the New Yorker) didn't mention which stretches he practiced. Maybe some core-strengthening would help? Any personal experiences out there? Thanks in advance.

 

I'm really fond of the simple standbys: sun salutations and downward dog.  They seem to extend and realign everything that I mess up when I've got stove or countertop related back pain.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#41 pastrygirl

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 09:36 PM

In addition to yoga and core strengthening, a foam roller is great for massaging sore muscles. http://www.amazon.co...F8&node=3407871

#42 pastrygirl

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:07 AM

Also yoga therapy balls, great for getting deep into those knots in your shoulders and lower back.