Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Cook-Off 63: Summer Squash

Vegetarian Cookoff

  • Please log in to reply
208 replies to this topic

#31 KaffeeKlatsch

KaffeeKlatsch
  • participating member
  • 50 posts

Posted 04 August 2013 - 05:39 PM

My favorite recipe for yellow crookneck uses the same technique as Jaymes. I don't add eggs, sour cream, or cheese though. We just use lots of butter, salt, & black pepper. Serve as a side with sliced tomatoes fresh from the garden. You don't even care what else is on the plate.



#32 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 2,138 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 04 August 2013 - 05:41 PM

• Simple stir-fry/sauté of zucchini sticks w/ a head of garlic (individual cloves well-smashed but unchopped) & sea salt. Eaten w/ white rice (Hom Mali).

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=31359

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1910081

 

 

• Stir-fried pork tenderloin slices§ w/ chopped Chinese celery & zucchini sliced into sticks, with garlic in peanut oil.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=32185

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1916265

 

 

• Courgettes/Baby zucchini, flowers intact, dredged in a batter of all-purpose flour & corn starch (~ 1:1), water, one egg, some sea salt and water; deep-fried till golden-brown.   Eaten as-is, clean flavor of the baby zucchini and flowers coming through.

Pics: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=32765 and http://forums.egulle...attach_id=32763

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1919959

 

 

• Linguine w/ lamb bacon, “Dodge City” salami, cippolini onions, broccoli florets, baby zucchini, Baby Bella  mushrooms and fried eggs.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=32991

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1921696

 

 

• Cappelini tossed in the pan w/ sautéed morels, sliced baby zucchini & spring onions.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=32979

Full Post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1921696

 

 

• Zucchini sticks: White-and-green patterned, yellow, and normal green young zucchini, cut into quartered or halved sticks, sautéed w/ garlic & sea salt in veggie oil.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=33070

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1922716

 

 

• Baby zucchini sautéed in olive oil.

• Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=33061

• Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1922716

 

 

• Chicken poaching stock w/ asparagus, baby squash & coriander leaves.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=33218

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1923881

 

 

• Asparagus & baby squash in chicken stock.

Pic: http://forums.egulle...attach_id=33211

Full post: http://forums.egulle...dpost&p=1923881



#33 FauxPas

FauxPas
  • participating member
  • 417 posts
  • Location:Mt Washington Alpine Resort, BC, Canada

Posted 04 August 2013 - 05:42 PM

I like making pickles and relishes with summer squash.

#34 Shalmanese

Shalmanese
  • participating member
  • 3,474 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:32 PM

Summer squash makes an amazing soup. The key is to first salt aggressively to draw out all the water and then saute until very well browned, preferably in plenty of butter or olive oil. Add in onions, garlic, aromatics etc. and then add water or stock to cover and simmer for 20m. Puree and pass through a sieve and you achieve a wonderfully creamy soup without the use of cream. Adjust the seasoning after you puree as the squash has a lot of salt. I love pairing it with raw or barely cooked shellfish; mussels, oysters, etc. The briny shellfish go wonderfully with the rich & smooth soup.
  • FrogPrincesse likes this
PS: I am a guy.

#35 Shalmanese

Shalmanese
  • participating member
  • 3,474 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 04 August 2013 - 10:08 PM

Oh, also, squash grated on a microplane and then mixed into meatballs give them an ethereally light texture. They're my go-to "mystery" ingredient when I make meatballs.
  • judiu likes this
PS: I am a guy.

#36 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 03:59 AM

Oh, also, squash grated on a microplane and then mixed into meatballs give them an ethereally light texture. They're my go-to "mystery" ingredient when I make meatballs.

Thanks for the tip.  I'm going to try that.  I've got a meatball class that I'm teaching in October and I think my students would love any technique that would make a good meatball.



#37 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,553 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 05 August 2013 - 06:42 AM

Rather than just posting links to stuff I've already cooked and taken pictures of and posted about (as in post #32 above - yawnnnn), I always look at a topic like this as providing the impetus to try something new.

 

So I pulled out a Roman cookbook (Cooking the Roman Way) as well as one of my 25-year old Marcella books (Marcella's Italian Kitchen).

 

These both have recipes for zucchini (a favorite Italian vegetable) cooked and/or marinated with vinegar and herbs (mint, parsley, basil), and after I take a trip to the green market I plan on giving both of them a try - to see which I like more!


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#38 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 07:13 AM

Rather than just posting links to stuff I've already cooked and taken pictures of and posted about (as in post #32 above - yawnnnn), I always look at a topic like this as providing the impetus to try something new.

 

So I pulled out a Roman cookbook (Cooking the Roman Way) as well as one of my 25-year old Marcella books (Marcella's Italian Kitchen).

 

These both have recipes for zucchini (a favorite Italian vegetable) cooked and/or marinated with vinegar and herbs (mint, parsley, basil), and after I take a trip to the green market I plan on giving both of them a try - to see which I like more!

Looking forward to seeing what you find at the market.  The Cook-Offs always benefit from a free-flow of ideas and information, along with photos that chronicle our adventures.  I for one have already learned a lot about how people cook summer squash. 


  • judiu likes this

#39 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:24 AM

I'm curious about some of the cooked squash dishes.  I have this vision of a mushy, watery squash puree.  How does a long cooking process alter the texture of the squash?



#40 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,413 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:40 AM

I'm curious about some of the cooked squash dishes.  I have this vision of a mushy, watery squash puree.  How does a long cooking process alter the texture of the squash?

 

Well, first, you don't cook it until it reaches that consistency.  I monitor it pretty closely and when it's tender, but still has texture, it's ready.

 

However, there's a wonderful and very old and time-honored southern dish called "Creamed Squash," where the idea is to cook it, along with a Vidalia onion, to a "mushy, water squash puree."  But then you put it into a skillet with some butter and you continue cooking and stirring until the water has evaporated and you continue cooking and mashing and stirring until it's quite dry, whereupon you add some heavy cream and sugar.  You wind up with a delicious dish that is about the consistency of loose mashed potatoes.

 

In the olden days, this was a very popular dish and showed up at every potluck and holiday table.  It was also one of the first solid-food dishes that got fed to baby. 


  • judiu and Shelby like this

#41 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,413 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:44 AM

I like making pickles and relishes with summer squash.

 

Although it doesn't go all the way to "pickles," I often slice raw summer squash and some onions and put them into the bottom of the salad bowl long before dinnertime.  Then pour over some of whatever salad dressing I'm going to be using.  I let that sit for a couple of hours before adding the rest of the ingredients and tossing.



#42 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:44 AM

I'm curious about some of the cooked squash dishes.  I have this vision of a mushy, watery squash puree.  How does a long cooking process alter the texture of the squash?

 

Well, first, you don't cook it until it reaches that consistency.  I monitor it pretty closely and when it's tender, but still has texture, it's ready.

 

However, there's a wonderful and very old and time-honored southern dish called "Creamed Squash," where the idea is to cook it, along with a Vidalia onion, to a "mushy, water squash puree."  But then you put it into a skillet with some butter and you continue cooking and stirring until the water has evaporated and you continue cooking and mashing and stirring until it's quite dry, whereupon you add some heavy cream and sugar.  You wind up with a delicious dish that is about the consistency of loose mashed potatoes.

 

In the olden days, this was a very popular dish and showed up at every potluck and holiday table.  It was also one of the first solid-food dishes that got fed to baby. 

I'll have to try that once I get finished with my first two dishes.  I have to admit the texture thing has me a bit skeptical, but I'm willing to give it a go. 



#43 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 2,138 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:01 AM

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

 

(edit: ...season 8 of Top Chef, that is)


Edited by huiray, 05 August 2013 - 09:11 AM.


#44 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:03 AM

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.



#45 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 2,138 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:10 AM

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.

 

I've used my OXO mandoline in the past to get shaved slices of the zucchini which I then cut (chef's knife) into ribbons of varying widths.  Yes, I did a tomato-based sauce too.  I don't remember what the other one was.  I'm thinking of tossing it with the leftover juices/sauces of some sort of poached or pan-fried fish, as another option.



#46 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,531 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:10 AM

"---Well, I for one would be interested in your recipes - whether already published or not. ---"

 

Hahaaa! You asked for it!!

 

I know, a little off-topic (sorry). Just to get everyone in a good mood. :-)

 

dcarch

 

Spaghetti & Meatballs

spaghettisquashhalloween3.jpg

 

 

Squash blossom pizza

Pizzasquahflower.jpg

Pizzasquahflower2.jpg

pizzasquahflower3.jpg

 


  • judiu likes this

#47 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:14 AM

 

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.

 

I've used my OXO mandoline in the past to get shaved slices of the zucchini which I then cut (chef's knife) into ribbons of varying widths.  Yes, I did a tomato-based sauce too.  I don't remember what the other one was.  I'm thinking of tossing it with the leftover juices/sauces of some sort of poached or pan-fried fish, as another option.

 

 

 

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.

 

I've used my OXO mandoline in the past to get shaved slices of the zucchini which I then cut (chef's knife) into ribbons of varying widths.  Yes, I did a tomato-based sauce too.  I don't remember what the other one was.  I'm thinking of tossing it with the leftover juices/sauces of some sort of poached or pan-fried fish, as another option.

I guess it's high time I purchase a mandoline.



#48 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 2,138 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 05 August 2013 - 09:20 AM

"---Well, I for one would be interested in your recipes - whether already published or not. ---"

 

Hahaaa! You asked for it!!

 

I know, a little off-topic (sorry). Just to get everyone in a good mood. :-)

 

dcarch

 

Spaghetti & Meatballs

spaghettisquashhalloween3.jpg

 

 

Squash blossom pizza

Pizzasquahflower.jpg

Pizzasquahflower2.jpg

pizzasquahflower3.jpg

 

 

Heh.  Cute fella.  That was spaghetti squash, yes?

 

The squash blossom pizza looks fantastic.  No stuffing in the blossoms, I think?  What was the cheese on it and how long did you "finish it off" at to melt the cheese in?


  • judiu likes this

#49 Plantes Vertes

Plantes Vertes
  • participating member
  • 894 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:20 AM

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.

 

 

 

Zucchini ribbons as a pasta substitute.  Not a new thing, but something I've done only a couple of times and would like to explore more.  

 

I remember Richard Blais whipping up that zucchini-pasta dish in ep. 14 of season 8 (when they were on that island in the Bahamas).  My issues would be things like the optimum thickness/width and cooking times and what sauces to pair with it, I suppose.

I've always wanted to try this, too.  What tool would one use to the ribbons that are thin?

 

A tomato based sauce would for sure be good.

 

I've used my OXO mandoline in the past to get shaved slices of the zucchini which I then cut (chef's knife) into ribbons of varying widths.  Yes, I did a tomato-based sauce too.  I don't remember what the other one was.  I'm thinking of tossing it with the leftover juices/sauces of some sort of poached or pan-fried fish, as another option.

 

The best implement for this is actually a spiraliser; the noodles come out as long as spaghetti that way, but curly! 


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 05 August 2013 - 11:22 AM.


#50 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,531 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 02:36 PM

"Heh.  Cute fella.  That was spaghetti squash, yes?

 

The squash blossom pizza looks fantastic.  No stuffing in the blossoms, I think?  What was the cheese on it and how long did you "finish it off" at to melt the cheese in?"

 

Yes, spaghetti squash, which is off-topic, not summer squash, which I apologized already. :-)

 

Yes, I had stuffing in the blossoms. Blue cheese nuggets. Moz. cheese on top, which is not that much flavor. The blue cheese inside the blossoms gives that little surprise flavor when you bite into it.

 

dcarch.



#51 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,581 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 02:51 PM

I have TONS of squash blossoms.....I'm just not sure how to make them.  I tried to fry them once....didn't turn out like I wanted.



#52 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,074 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 05 August 2013 - 03:23 PM

I'm quite fond of blossoms when lightly steamed - basically I give them as long as I'd give asparagus (which are a nice compliment to blossoms), which is to say just enough time to bring up the colour.  Then shock in cold water and use on salads.  

 

On the other hand, sugaring them (painting raw blossoms with a bit of gum arabic solution and dredging lightly and carefully in granulated sugar) makes them excellent for edible cake garnishes.


  • Shelby likes this
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#53 Plantes Vertes

Plantes Vertes
  • participating member
  • 894 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 03:34 PM

Shelby, it's not complicated to make stuffed squash flowers if that idea grabs you (but it is fiddly). You prepare a filling and stuff the flowers with a teaspoon (they hold about 1oz filling), then either submerge them in a very light batter made with flour, egg white and fizzy water or dip in egg white then flour, and either shallow fry in ample oil, or pick them up with chopsticks and drop them into hot deep fat for a few seconds and remove to kitchen paper with a slotted spoon.

 

Some fillings:

Shrimp, garlic and ginger

Salmon mousse 

Ricotta/mozzarella and herbs or anchovies

Goat's cheese

Risotto

Crab with cream cheese

Pureed vegetable with parmesan


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 05 August 2013 - 03:40 PM.

  • judiu and Shelby like this

#54 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,827 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 05 August 2013 - 03:42 PM

Shelby - I like the blossoms fried after a a quick pass through a very thin batter of rice flour or cornstarch rather than wheat flour. They are so delicate and you want to be able to taste that sweet hint of the squash in progress. I am also fond of them in a frittata; and they are so pretty. In Mexico they are often found in quesadillas, and frequently without cheese. An employee raised in Mexico who grew up with very little in the way of material goods said his mother rejoiced when they were plentiful. Many prefer the female flower as it is more robust. Since you have such a bounty you can afford to select the girls.
  • Shelby likes this

#55 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 04:28 PM

For my first dish I decided to stuff a patty pan squash with merguez and accompany it with a chorizo oil and zucchini dressed with vinaigrette.  I've been making lamb merguez for years and I thought the bright, fragrant, spicy flavors would go well with sweet squash.  The chorizo oil added a dash of color and enhanced the flavor of the smoked paprika in the merguez.  But I couldn't leave out zucchini so I decided to grill it to soften it and bring out some sugar, then dress it in a tangy preserved lemon vinaigrette.  Trust me, that was only the theory, I didn't really know how this would turn out.

 

It took a lot of steps and time, but the effort paid off.

 

Harissa-

10 dried chiles, (I used ancho, California and cascabel)

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tsp. salt

1 tsp. ground coriander

1 tsp. caraway seeds

1 tsp. smoked paprika

1 tsp. ground cumin

2 tbsp. olive oil

 

Rehydrate the dried chiles in hot water for about 30 minutes until soft.  Remove the stems and seeds and place in a food processor with the other ingredients, adding enough olive oil to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate the harissa at this point, but I heat it in a pan over low temp to bring the ingredients together before storing in the refrigerator overnight.

Harissa 5.jpg

 

Merguez-

1 1/2lbs. ground lamb

1 1/4 tsp. fennel seed

3 cloves garlic, minced

2 tbsp. harissa

1 1/4 tsp. ground cumin

1 1/4 tsp. ground coriander

1/4 tsp. cinnamon

2 chipotle chilis and sauce

1/3 cup chopped fresh mint

1/3 cup chopped fresh basil

1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Olive oil

 

Mix all the ingredients and then cover and store in the refrigerator overnight to let the flavors come together.  On the day of service, heat the olive oil in a saute pan.  Add the merguez mixture and cook until done, about 15 minutes.  Drain.

Merguez 1.jpg

 

Merguez 2.jpg

 

Chorizo Oil-

I typically make chorizo oil with a dried, aged Spanish chorizo.  Unfortunately the store doesn't carry that brand anymore but they did have this chorizo from Missouri.  It's good, just not as good as the Spanish chorizo.

zuchinni cook-off 001.JPG

 

zuchinni cook-off 009.JPG

 

Cut the chorizo into small dice and saute in a hot pan.  You can add a little olive oil to quick-start the cooking process.  As the chorizo heats it seeps out a reddish oil.  The fattier the chorizo the more fragrant and flavorful the oil.

 

Grilled Zucchini-

Grilling zucchini softens the flesh and brings out some of the natural sugar.  I cut the zucchini lengthwise in about 3/8 thick slices and simply grill it in a hot pan on top of the stove. This cast iron grill pan has been with me for years and it's to the point I don't even add any oil. 

zuchinni cook-off 016.JPG

 

zuchinni cook-off 018.JPG

 

I always have a jar of preserved lemons lying in wait.  The flavor can be a bit overpowering--salty, acidic and tart--so you only use a small amount.  I wanted something sweet, sour and fragrant to counter the richness of the sausage in the patty pan.

zuchinni cook-off 021.JPG

 

Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette-

1 tbsp. diced preserved lemon

Dash fresh lemon juice

1 tbsp. chopped fresh chives

1 tsp. sugar

1/2 tsp. salt

Black pepper

1/3 cup vinegar, (I used apple cider vinegar)

2/3 cup olive oil

 

Cut the soft pith off the preserved lemon, then cut the peel into tiny dice.  Add the preserved lemon to a bowl and add the lemon juice, chives, sugar, salt pepper, vinegar and olive oil.  Like any vinaigrette, I always adjust the ratio of oil and vinegar depending on my tastes that day.  And by the way, the addition of sugar to zucchini really evokes flavor.  It works!  Add the diced zucchini to the vinaigrette.

 

Cooking and Plating-

Here are the little patty pan's on top of a steamer basket.  Now this was a rookie's attempt mind you as I've never cooked stuffed summer squash.  I put about 1/2" of water in the pot, added the steamer basket, the squash, then covered the pot and roasted/steamed the squash in a 350 oven for about 35 minutes until the flesh of the squash was just tender.

zuchinni cook-off 043.JPG

 

Patty Pan Squash Stuffed with Lamb Merguez, Chorizo Oil and Grilled Zucchini/Preserved Lemon Vinaigrette-

zuchinni cook-off 051.JPG

 

zuchinni cook-off 055.JPG

 

We all have those aha moments when we craft a delicious dish.  In this case, I was lucky to have an aha moment on my first attempt.  And while the stuffed squash was sweet, meaty and rich, the star of the dish was the grilled zucchini vinaigrette.  It would be delicious with grilled fish.  But the one little detail that made the full dish a success was a little garnish I found in my garden--oregano blossoms.  That fresh, clean, perfume of oregano really made a difference.  Enjoy.


  • Okanagancook likes this

#56 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 05 August 2013 - 04:42 PM

Now I need some ideas for my next dish.  I'm thinking of a grilled zucchini and vegetable terrine with herbed ricotta.  I'm sort of toying with the idea of a take on ratatouille but grilling the vegetables then compressing the layers and serving the dish cold.  I'm thinking provencal flavors and lavendar.  What about a sauce?  My first thought was a tomato base, but I'm not sure I want something thin like a tomato water or a chunky smoked tomato vinaigrette.  Help.



#57 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,074 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:06 PM

David, I do something similar to what you're describing quite often - a puree (or if you're me, a slightly rougher version produced by sort of mashing the tomatoes with a fork) of roasted or grilled tomatoes, with garlic and oregano (or with herbs that are complimentary to what you put in your ricotta) works beautifully between the layers and holds everything together without overpowering the flavours of the individual veggies.

 

I'm actually doing a hot take on this tonight for dinner - a layered terrine type creature consisting of giant marrow, eggplants, and tomato with queso fresco.  It's not quite a ratatouille, but that's the flavour profile I use. Assembly and final photos later; it's a very simple dish to put together but the final effect is impressive.

 

--

 

Oh, and next time I have pattypans, I'm totally stealing that recipe.  It sounds absolutely delish.


  • David Ross likes this
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#58 Plantes Vertes

Plantes Vertes
  • participating member
  • 894 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:21 PM

David, I have seen a very attractive recipe for just what you mentioned: first you roast strips of peppers, aubergine and courgettes in olive oil. Then you grease a bread tin or terrine dish and line it with cling film and then wilted spinach leaves, laying the ends of the leaves so they hang down over the edge. Make up some agar-agar and dip the roasted vegetables in one by one, layering them inside the dish. Then you pick up the spinach overhang and cover the top, and cover with cling film. Weigh down and refrigerate until set.

 

A tomato sauce that I love is very simple; you refresh three sundried tomatoes in hot water and process them with half a pound of baby tomatoes and a tablespoon of olive oil. That's it.

 

Then you turn out and slice the terrine, spoon over the tomato sauce and sprinkle with fresh herbs.



#59 Plantes Vertes

Plantes Vertes
  • participating member
  • 894 posts

Posted 05 August 2013 - 05:22 PM

Sorry, we just cross-posted! Both the recipes sound great.



#60 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,381 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 06 August 2013 - 03:55 PM

If you're looking for unique squash cutters, head to a local Asian grocery store.  I've acquired probably around 50 different vegetable and fruit cutters during travels to San Francisco, Portland, Vancouver and Seattle and points in between.  Most are incredibly cheap compared to vegetable peelers/cutters you'd find at a National chain store and they offer a variety of unusual cutting blades. lf you can find a tiny melon baller, they are wonderful for cutting balls of zucchini.  You get both the green skin and lighter color of the inside of the zucchini in a little ball.  Wonderful sauteed in butter or olive oil and a great plate presentation. 

 

I just came back from the store with some yellow squash and zucchini so I'll get to cutting and provide some photos. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Vegetarian, Cookoff