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Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 2)

Charcuterie Cookbook

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39 replies to this topic

#31 ninagluck

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 12:32 AM

hallo,

this piece is perfect for a Coppa. as you said, it is from the neck and due to its fat content it is also used for making sausages.

 

ninagluck



#32 Merkinz

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 01:36 AM

Great! Thanks for the comments :)



#33 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 05:23 AM

Merkinz,

 

From here, it looks like you have the upper part (collar) of what we call a "Boston Butt."

That is what's cured (often after trimming) to make coppa or cottage ham.

 

See BriCan's first post in the following link....he demonstrates how the collar is separated from a full Boston Butt and prepared for coppa.....

 

http://forum.sausage....php?f=4&t=8603


~Martin
 
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#34 Merkinz

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 01:45 PM

Merkinz,

 

From here, it looks like you have the upper part (collar) of what we call a "Boston Butt."

That is what's cured (often after trimming) to make coppa or cottage ham.

 

See BriCan's first post in the following link....he demonstrates how the collar is separated from a full Boston Butt and prepared for coppa.....

 

http://forum.sausage....php?f=4&t=8603

 

Thanks Martin!

 

That is exactly what I was looking for. This kind of stuff is had to find using google but you sir are a wealth of knowledge! ... You just helped me with the nitrite burned bacon on chefsteps :biggrin:

 

Can I just pay you to come and teach me the way of charcuterie? :smile:


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#35 Merkinz

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 11:29 PM

Hey all. I'm making my first Bresaola at the moment. It's currently in it's first week of curing. Keen to ask a few questions:

- Should I wrap it in muslin? I know I don't need to but is there any benefit?

- Should I inoculate with mold? ... again, I know I don't need to but what are peoples experiences?

- Do you have any other tips so I can get a good result the first time?

 

Cheers.



#36 ninagluck

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:22 AM

well, depending on the humidity where you dry the piece. I wrap mine in muslin and spray he muslin with water.

I don't put old on bresaola. Wash the piece with a redwine/salt mixture, that gives a nice taste.



#37 Merkinz

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 12:18 AM

Thanks I'll give that a go. Relative humidity is actually quite high in my curing chamber so I might skip the muslin.


Edited by Merkinz, 29 April 2014 - 12:18 AM.


#38 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 04:46 PM

Couple of quick questions about the basic country ham (the one in the style of Serrano, San Danielle, etc).

 

  • They call for a full leg of pork. About 5-6 kilos of meat, from memory. I want to use a 1-2 kilo piece of meat because this is a trial run and I'm not even sure my curing environment is suitable. Is this okay? Will it significantly shorten the drying time or should I still figure on the 4-5 months?
  • Is the bone critical? Sometimes I can only find leg pieces at the size I want with the bone already removed.
  • Instead of parking it in a box during the salt curing process, can I just vac seal it?

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#39 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 05:26 PM

Go here http://www.mrswheelb...allenge-curing/ amd scroll down to Jambons de Camont
 AKA Noix de Jambon.

 

A video of Dominique Chapolard preparing Noix de Jambon......

 


~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 


#40 rotuts

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:57 AM

DDF  you come up with some of the best vids !

 

you should start a topic:   My favorite cooking vids.

 

:biggrin:


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