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Chinese Eats at Home (Part 3)

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#511 C. sapidus

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 07:31 PM

Dinner from Revolutionary Chinese Cooking

General Tso’s chicken (Taiwan version) – Chunks of chicken thighs, marinated with light and dark soy sauce, egg yolk, potato flour, and peanut oil, and then deep-fried. Stir-fried garlic, ginger, and dried chiles with a sauce of tomato paste, potato flour, light and dark soy sauce, rice vinegar, and stock, boiled to thicken, tossed with the chicken, and then finished with scallions and sesame oil.

Steamed snow peas with ginger – with salt and chicken stock. Simple and good. Jasmine rice and unpictured salad.

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#512 patrickamory

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 09:09 PM

How was that General Tso's chicken Bruce??

#513 Kouign Aman

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 09:28 PM

Chinese inspired, eaten at home.
bokchoy, onions, mushrooms - stirfried together

mahi mahi chunks cooked with black beans, ginger, szechuan peppercorns.

rice
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#514 C. sapidus

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 04:50 AM

How was that General Tso's chicken Bruce??

Chicken was wonderfully tender. Sauce needed a bit more flavor to my taste - next time I'll increase chiles, soy sauce, and vinegar. Younger son and Mrs. C liked the sauce and chicken as is.

I am interested to try the other version of Gen. Tso in RCC and compare.

mahi mahi chunks cooked with black beans, ginger, szechuan peppercorns.


Kouign - That sounds delicious! I love that combination of flavors.

Edited by C. sapidus, 12 February 2013 - 04:52 AM.


#515 Prawncrackers

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:00 AM

Happy Chinese New Year of the Snake everybody. We had a hot pot over the weekend to see in the new year and yesterday we made some dumplings. Pork and prawn potstickers (鍋貼) to be precise. The unbleached flour and the light in my kitchen made them look particularly golden!

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Edited by Prawncrackers, 13 February 2013 - 05:01 AM.


#516 patrickamory

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:01 PM

Stunning photography as always Prawncrackers... also those dumplings are remarkably uniform in size and shape.

#517 Kouign Aman

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:49 PM

They are so pretty. And sound delicious.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#518 liuzhou

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 05:10 AM

Pork with Green Chillies 青椒肉片. Still steaming from the wok.

I usually only eat this in Chinese fast food restaurants*, but tonight made it myself. A very common, simple, but delicious dish here in southern China.

It was served with the usual rice and some braised mixed mushrooms which I neglected to photograph.

qingjiao roupian2.jpg

qingjiao roupian1.jpg

*Nothing like western fast food restaurants. It means more like 'informal dining'.

#519 Jason Perlow

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:33 PM

What was your recipe for that pork and green chiles?
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#520 liuzhou

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:14 PM

What was your recipe for that pork and green chiles?

I'm not sure that calling this a recipe isn't lending it a dignity to which it does not aspire, but here goes. It is a basic stir fry.

First I should explain the chillies. I used two varieties.

chillies.jpg

The larger ones at the back are the ones I usually use, but the batch I have now are a bit on the mild side, so I augmented them with the thin hot type at the front. The thin one was finely chopped and the large ones sliced.

I sliced the pork thinly then marinaded it in Shaoxing wine and corn starch. I stir fried some garlic and ginger for a few seconds until fragrant then added the pork and the hot chilli. When the pork was half done I added some dark soy sauce and the sliced chillies and continued cooking until the pork was done. Added chopped Chinese chives and a splash of sesame oil and served.

#521 patrickamory

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:26 PM

liuzhou - yum, that sounds delicious. What cut of pork did you use?

 

I'm a beginner but after making the chicken with sichuan peppercorns from Grace Young twice tonight (12 oz of meat each time), I felt brave enough to improvise with some asparagus.

 

Heated the wok until water vaporized in a second, added oil till just smoking, added dried evenly diced asparagus, stir-fried for about a minute, and removed to a bowl. Let the wok heat for a bit and added thinly sliced garlic, ginger and scallions. Stir-fried for about 15 seconds, then re-added the asparagus, plus some light soy sauce and Shaoxing wine - the sauce reduced and coated the vegetables almost instantly, decanted to bowl, and served.

 

No photos, but it was a success! I feel inordinately pleased with myself, since I'm not a great improviser in any cuisine.



#522 liuzhou

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 10:58 PM

liuzhou - yum, that sounds delicious. What cut of pork did you use? 

 

 

Ah! Every time I post, I dread that question.

Butchers in China do not use the same cuts as those in western countries. In fact, it often seems that they just chop away at random. For this type of dish, I just look for a fresh looking, reasonably lean piece of meat. Something like this.

 

pork.jpg  



#523 rotuts

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:36 AM

doesn't that random chop-chop just kill you!.   you have to get to the right place in the line to get the right piece.

 

" No, please.  You go ahead, Pleeeeeeeeeese!"



#524 liuzhou

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 06:19 AM

 you have to get to the right place in the line to get the right piece.

 

line? in China? 

Dream on! The concept has never caught on.



#525 rotuts

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:04 AM

OK  the right spot in the crowd

 

i have noticed a certain lack of 'protocol' at the butcher counter (s) in chinatown come to think of it.



#526 liuzhou

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:09 AM

That said, most of the locals are looking for the piece of pork which is 95% fat, so I don't have a lot of problems finding what I want.



#527 jsager01

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 08:13 AM

liuzhou - yum, that sounds delicious. What cut of pork did you use? 

 

 

Ah! Every time I post, I dread that question.

Butchers in China do not use the same cuts as those in western countries. In fact, it often seems that they just chop away at random. For this type of dish, I just look for a fresh looking, reasonably lean piece of meat. Something like this.

 

 pork.jpg

 

It is absolutely true that butchers in China do not use the same cuts as those in western countries, just as butchers in UK do not use the same cuts as those in US, 'mainland' europe, etc,  countries.  For that matter, butchers in different regions in China do not offer the exact same cuts, although there are some commonalities.

 

what i find useful, in whatever country where they  " they just chop away at random",  is to ask the butcher for the specific application of the cut of meat that i am interested in or just curious about. It will be an amazing free lesson into the local cuisine, assuming you speak the local dialect/language, or have a local to interpret. 



#528 liuzhou

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 08:26 AM

For that matter, butchers in different regions in China do not offer the exact same cut

Different butchers in the same market don't offer the same "cuts".

what i find useful, in whatever country where they " they just chop away at random", is to ask the butcher for the specific application of the cut of meat that i am interested in or just curious about. It will be an amazing free lesson into the local cuisine, assuming you speak the local dialect/language, or have a local to interpret.


Great idea. Which is unlikely to work here. The 'butcher' on duty in the market doesn't usually know or care. And if they do, they sure ain't going to be giving free cooking lessons in the market during a busy morning flogging their wares. Supermarket staff are even less likely to help.

And even then, I still often want to find a specific ingredient rather than pick up something at random, fun though that can be.

Yes, I speak the language.

Edited by liuzhou, 20 February 2013 - 08:47 AM.


#529 Prawncrackers

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 02:51 PM

This thread needs a bump up. One of my favourite Chinese meals recently. Steamed lemon sole with lap cheung and doong goo, chicken rice and some plain pak choy with oyster sauce. Ultimate comfort food!

 

20130327c.JPG


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#530 Jason Perlow

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 05:13 PM

8659612126_634f77e031_o.jpg

 

Shrimp and Chicken Stir-Fry with Curry & Coconut Flavor / Eggplant and Zucchini. An improvised dish, we had a coconut tree harvested at our next door neighbors and we came into a windfall of coconut jelly/meat and coconut water. We processed up the coco meat/jelly/water and added it to a curry powder, and stir fried with the usual soy sauce. Was excellent.

 

8658505913_5b726ac837_o.jpg

 

Here is how it was plated, with Thai Red Rice.

 

8664476328_c26a71a00e_o.jpg

 

Another Coconut Curry dish, this one a fried rice with BBQ chicken thigh meat and the leftover red rice.


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#531 jsager01

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:36 AM

if you are interested in Chinese (as in China) cuisine, have a look.

 

http://tinyurl.com/cctv-doc



#532 liuzhou

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 11:16 PM

This series isn't at all bad.

 

There has been a glut of these food programs in China since the massive success of the "A Bite of China" (also available at the same link). "A Bite" is light years ahead of any of them. Series two is in production. I can't wait. 



#533 liuzhou

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 11:08 PM

Prompted by your post, I just re-watched a couple of episodes ( I have them on DVD) and remember what irritated me about them. The narrator, although obviously a native English speaker, has this bizarre intonation where he stresses random words in sentences - often prepositions.

 

"The meat is put (long pause) IN (another pause) the wok."

 

His Chinese pronunciation is also awful. In the 'Spicy Food' episode, every time he mispronounces Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan, I want to throw him in the wok!

 

(I'm quite peaceful, really!}



#534 patrickamory

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 07:23 PM

Just watched the spicy food episode. Interesting - I always thought that the truly spicy cuisine came from Hunan Province, whereas Sichuan chillis are milder and usually coupled with Sichuan peppercorns for the ma-la effect. None of that gets mentioned though.

 

Definitely some great wok and cleaver skills on display.

 

(I see why you're annoyed with his Chinese pronunciation liuzhou.)



#535 liuzhou

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 08:03 PM

Yes, I too was disappointed that they didn't mention Hunan. I lived there from 1996 -1999 and still miss the food. It is indeed often a lot spicier than Sichuan.



#536 Prawncrackers

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:55 AM

Consecutive Chinese dinners this week so thinking this thread could do with a bump!

 

First off, king crab in black bean sauce, with the leftover crab in fried rice with lap cheung. Broccoli and liver sausage with oyster sauce. 

 

20131029a.JPG

 

 

Golden sand cod cheeks, dry fried broccoli with lap yuk, mustard greens and salty duck egg.

 

20131030b.JPG

 

 


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#537 liuzhou

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:07 AM

Looks lovely. And thanks for reviving the thread.

 

Although I have contributed to the Breakfast, Dinner, Lunch and Supper threads, I now think they are a bad idea. The regional gets lost in the mêlée.

 

(P.S. I think I just imagined there was a Supper thread. Give them time.)







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