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eG Foodblog: SobaAddict70 (2013) -- La Cuisine du Marché

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#31 heidih

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 03:54 PM

Lovely food. On the baked egg dish that was shown with the asparagus salad - did you have anything like some crusty bread with that? 



#32 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 04:02 PM

Lovely food. On the baked egg dish that was shown with the asparagus salad - did you have anything like some crusty bread with that? 

 

nope.  if I eat carbs too early in the day (it's 7 pm now but it's 2 pm for me, body-clock wise), I fall asleep.

 

oddly enough, I get more energetic as the day goes on, which is why during the weekend, my schedule is inverted.



#33 huiray

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 04:09 PM

Thanks, Soba.  Nice blog over there too.



#34 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 11:12 PM

Late dinner tonight -- got carried away talking to my boyfriend on the phone that I lost track of time. Oops.

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This is 2 large slices of shoulder bacon (from Flying Pigs Farm -- http://flyingpigsfarm.com) coarsely diced, and cooked slowly over low heat along with 2 tablespoons boiling water. The idea is to let the water boil off while letting the fat from the bacon leach out onto the pan. Eventually the bacon will begin to crisp up. Incidentally, this trick can be used with pancetta or guanciale.

Meanwhile, I had 4 medium gold cippolini onions, peeled and sliced lengthwise that were briefly simmered in a pot of lightly salted water for about 2-3 minutes, then drained.

#35 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 11:16 PM

Once the bacon started to crisp, I transferred them to a ramekin, then warmed some olive oil and fried the onion halves in the heated oil until they were lightly browned. Then added the bacon back to the pan and let the onions and bacon cook for 1-2 more minutes.

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Gold cippolini onions, shoulder bacon, sherry vinaigrette

Sherry vinaigrette -- 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar, 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, sea salt and black pepper to taste.



#36 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:32 AM

Next:

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This is 1 onion, 3 celery stalks (and leaves) and 2 medium peeled carrots, all thinly sliced and being cooked in 1/4 cup olive oil. I'll let this cook down for the next 20 minutes before adding 1/2 head shredded broccoli rabe, and 1/3 cup cooked chickpeas and heirloom beans. (The chickpeas and beans were simmered for 2 hours along with 2 bay leaves and a healthy pinch of salt, then drained. Reserve the bean cooking liquid.)

Edited by SobaAddict70, 26 May 2013 - 12:50 AM.


#37 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:41 AM

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After about 10 minutes, I've added a pinch of salt and some chopped fresh oregano, stirred a few times, then turned the heat down some more.

#38 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 12:55 AM

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This is after roughly 20 minutes.  You can cook this down even more if you like; but if I did that, I'd be eating at 4:30 am, LOL.

 

To this was added the broccoli rabe, 1/4 bean cooking liquid, and the cooked beans and chickpeas, along with another pinch of salt and some peperoncini.  I've turned the heat down and partly covered it; this will simmer for about 10 more minutes.



#39 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 01:09 AM

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Broccoli rabe with heirloom beans and Umbrian chickpeas

Original recipe here, but with changes made noted above: http://kitchenseason...lowly-simmered/

#40 weinoo

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:24 AM

Patrick, the chickpeas are imported from Umbria, Italy. you can get them at Eataly.

And DiPalo's.


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#41 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:45 AM

Good morning.

I'm having a bowl of broccoli rabe from last night. I usually don't like leftovers. My experience making chicken and dumplings last year taught me a lesson, that the only way I'll make something that will feed more than an army of one will be if I have a boyfriend. Well, I do now but he lives 3,000 miles away from me so until I move to the SF Bay Area, leftovers are not something that will appear much at Casa Soba.  (Chicken and dumplings is nice, but in that specific instance, I was eating chicken and dumplings for 4 days a week.  Freezing was not an option because there wasn't much room in the freezer.)

 

Dinner menu for May 26, 2013:

 

One-egg omelette with ramps

Butter-braised Japanese turnips and celery

Carrot and cippolini onion confit

Pearl barley biryani

 

More later.



#42 heidih

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:13 AM

Looking forward to a learning experience with the pearl barley biryani



#43 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:50 AM

You can make biryani using stuff besides rice.  It won't be an authentic biryani, but that's not the point.  It's so I can help people expand their horizons when they're faced with the question of what to have for dinner.



#44 rotuts

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:41 AM

looking forward to    pearl barley biryani

 

I make a biryani-ish dish in the summer with # 2 or # 3 bulgur.  I just soak it and then all the rest of a usually biryani.



#45 Kim Shook

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:28 PM

Oh, my!  What a lovely surprise to come back to eG after being too busy to visit for a couple of weeks and find you blogging, Soba!  Everything looks stunning – fresh, beautiful, delicious and gorgeously photographed!  Those baked eggs and the bacon and onion dish were standouts for me!



#46 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:42 PM

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The last ramps of the season. Sigh.

Bid them good-bye until next year.

Top: unsalted butter, heavy cream, farm egg.

One-egg omelettes are more delicate than omelettes made with two or more eggs. You have to be quick or else they'll burn. You can't overstuff them or they'll collapse.

The template is 1 egg, beaten, salt and pepper to taste, and 1 tablespoon heavy cream. The filling consists of chopped ramps, seasoned with sea salt and black pepper, cooked in melted unsalted butter.

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One-egg omelette with ramps.

#47 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 07:50 PM

Beautiful omelette, Soba!

#48 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:20 PM

Oh, my!  What a lovely surprise to come back to eG after being too busy to visit for a couple of weeks and find you blogging, Soba!  Everything looks stunning – fresh, beautiful, delicious and gorgeously photographed!  Those baked eggs and the bacon and onion dish were standouts for me!

 

thanks Kim.  :)



#49 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 08:22 PM

Beautiful omelette, Soba!

 

thanks FP.  the heavy cream does make a difference, slightly more sturdy than an omelette made with 1 tablespoon cold water.



#50 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 09:04 PM

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Butter-braised Japanese turnips and celery.

1/2 cup sliced celery and Japanese turnips
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
a pinch of sea salt
1 heaping tablespoon minced chives
a little freshly milled black pepper
3 tablespoons chicken stock

Wash and slice the celery diagonally into 2 inch slices. Quarter the turnips or leave whole, depending on size. Bring a pot of water to a boil , then blanch the celery and turnips for five minutes.

Drain, then add the remaining ingredients. Turn heat to low and braise for 25-30 minutes, covered, checking the vegetables every once in a while to make sure it's braising, and not burning.

Adapted from: http://shesinthekitc...braises-au.html

 

 



#51 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 10:42 PM

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Carrot and cippolini onion confit

 

4 rainbow carrots, peeled and trimmed

3 gold cippolini onions, peeled and trimmed of its stem end

1/2 cup olive oil

1 large shallot, peeled and trimmed, and thinly sliced

juice of 1 lemon

1 lemon, cut into quarters

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 teaspoon ground cumin

pinch of sea salt

1 tablespoon capers

 

Bring a pot of water to a boil, then add the carrots and onions.  Simmer for 8-10 minutes over low heat or until carrots yield some resistance when pierced with a fork.  You don't want the carrots to be tender, since they'll cook further in the olive oil bath.

 

Drain the vegetables, then place in a heavy-bottomed pot and add the olive oil, shallot, lemon juice, lemon, fennel seeds, crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, sea salt and capers.  Simmer over low heat for 45 minutes to one hour or until the carrots are tender and easily pierced with a fork.  The onions should be falling apart.

 

Spoon onto a serving bowl, garnish with parsley or chives, then serve at once.

 

Substituting cauliflower for the cippolini onion is another variation.  Other add-ins are orange juice and quartered oranges, kumquats, Meyer lemons, marinated olives and green garlic.



#52 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:41 PM

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Pearl barley biryani.

I like pushing the boundaries of "what is possible" when it comes to food while still keeping one foot in tradition.  The only things that differ here are the grain that was used and dried cranberries instead of raisins, otherwise it still has the same spices and ingredients that you may find in a vegetable biryani -- black mustard seeds, curry leaves, cumin, green cardamom, onions, ghee, etc.


Edited by SobaAddict70, 26 May 2013 - 11:41 PM.


#53 huiray

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:43 AM

The non-rice biryani is interesting and looks tasty, yes - but I will confess that I would prefer to have rice in my biryani.  I might call the barley-subbed dish by another name, but that's just me.

 

BTW - are the plates you show (in general, not just the ones in this blog) the plates you eat...or do you do that Keith_W subterfuge of plating a teeny portion for the photo then loading it up after the photo?  Just curious.  Enquiring minds want to know and all that stuff. :-) 



#54 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:14 AM

The non-rice biryani is interesting and looks tasty, yes - but I will confess that I would prefer to have rice in my biryani.  I might call the barley-subbed dish by another name, but that's just me.

 

BTW - are the plates you show (in general, not just the ones in this blog) the plates you eat...or do you do that Keith_W subterfuge of plating a teeny portion for the photo then loading it up after the photo?  Just curious.  Enquiring minds want to know and all that stuff. :-) 

 

1.  "tradition" is not the same thing as "authenticity".  I think we can all agree that the barley biryani is not authentic, but it follows the same techniques as a traditional biryani -- toast spices in ghee, add aromatic vegetables, etc.  I can do an authentic biryani, cassoulet, carbonara, bourguignon, etc. but I'm more interested in expanding the realm of what is possible while still following certain rules.  it works for me, and maybe other people.  *shrug*  for instance, on the blog you will find a recipe for BEET bourguignon -- pretty much Julia's recipe except it's vegan and gluten-free.

 

2.  most of the time, what you see is how it's served.  there are times when I do what Keith does, but that's not information that has to be shared.  :wink:


Edited by SobaAddict70, 27 May 2013 - 01:16 AM.


#55 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:34 AM

So, tomorrow (Monday), I have brunch in the East Village with my mother -- you'll see pix of that.

 

Not sure what's for dinner tomorrow, probably leftover biryani -- but I might do a salad or a couple of apps to start.

 

I'll also comment more on how I devise menus.  A few months ago there was a thread started by liuzhou on "Cooking For One"; this blog was a reaction to that.

 

Talk to y'all later.



#56 patrickamory

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:21 AM

PERFECT omelet Soba. No unsightly brown on the outside - it could have been made in France. Rare to see.



#57 huiray

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:11 PM

Heh.  I like to see some browning on my omelets.  I don't personally care for the ultra-French type of omelets.  I for one thought that Top Chef episode in the last season with Wolfgang Puck asking his gang of cheftestapants-to-be candidates to "make him an omelet" (without any other qualifications) to be both laughable and eyebrow-raising.  I WISH someone had made a SE-Asian type omelet for him, or a bubbly-browned-flat omelet for him, or even something like Oh Chien (oyster omelet) for him, rather than defaulting to some approximation of a FRENCHIFIED omelet.


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#58 weinoo

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:31 PM

Heh.  I like to see some browning on my omelets.  I don't personally care for the ultra-French type of omelets.  I for one thought that Top Chef episode in the last season with Wolfgang Puck asking his gang of cheftestapants-to-be candidates to "make him an omelet" (without any other qualifications) to be both laughable and eyebrow-raising.  I WISH someone had made a SE-Asian type omelet for him, or a bubbly-browned-flat omelet for him, or even something like Oh Chien (oyster omelet) for him, rather than defaulting to some approximation of a FRENCHIFIED omelet.

 

I guess you can show everyone those when you do a blog.


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#59 patrickamory

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 03:42 PM

Gauntlet thrown!  :laugh:



#60 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 04:20 PM

for huiray, here's a one-egg omelette from a few days ago ... I forget what the filling was, but I think it might have been cheese and something else.

 

you'll notice the brown spots.  this omelette had 1 tablespoon cold water and no cream.  personally I prefer a French omelette in the same way as how Julia demonstrated on her show, but as the saying goes, à chacun son goût.

 

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