Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 2)


  • Please log in to reply
228 replies to this topic

#61 Tri2Cook

Tri2Cook
  • participating member
  • 3,648 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:31 PM

Welcome and...

Rarely have "fails".


...you're not trying hard enough. :raz: :biggrin:
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#62 thock

thock
  • participating member
  • 290 posts

Posted 19 October 2012 - 06:44 AM



Funnel with strainer and cap thingy.

The "funnel with strainer and cap thingy" looks like the top to a cocktail shaker. You're just missing the shaker chamber.

Thock, I believe that your strainer thingie is not aluminium, but silver, perhaps plated, or maybe sterling. Any marks probably would have been on the bottom of the shaker part. Enjoy it!


That makes sense about the strainer thingy. So the cap and the strainer thingy would have both been part of the cocktail shaker?

How would I determine if it is silver plate vs. aluminum? I'll have to take a better look at both those and the funnel they were taped inside of.

Thanks!
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#63 Toliver

Toliver
  • participating member
  • 4,590 posts
  • Location:Bakersfield, California

Posted 19 October 2012 - 09:30 AM

That makes sense about the strainer thingy. So the cap and the strainer thingy would have both been part of the cocktail shaker?

Yes. There would have also been a (usually) tall container. See this video:

You really don't need the original matching container in order to use your strainer. You can use a large sturdy glass in place of a container as long as the strainer portion fits snugly atop the glass. As you shake this makeshift cocktail shaker, you just make sure you hold the strainer (and its closed lid) snugly to the glass portion so there won't be any leaks as you shake it.

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'
Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”
– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”


#64 Porthos

Porthos
  • participating member
  • 1,081 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 19 October 2012 - 12:32 PM

Regarding cocktail shakers: at the Los Angeles County Fair (and I assume other fairs) there is a tequilla stand that sells margeritas (sp?) in self-contained cocktail shaker/strainers that you take away with you. I'm surprized I've never seen one at any of the thrift shops I haunt.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Unrelenting Carnivore
"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#65 judiu

judiu
  • participating member
  • 2,245 posts
  • Location:South Florida

Posted 19 October 2012 - 08:17 PM

Tracy, if you can rub the tarnish off the surface with your thumb, it's probably silver. The pieces will feel heavy in your hand, too . Look at the peices under a strong light, especially where they would rub when in use to spot wear and 'off' colours. If you see brass or copper under the worn areas, it's plated. HTH!
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

#66 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,739 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 21 October 2012 - 06:22 PM

I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

079.JPG

#67 robirdstx

robirdstx
  • participating member
  • 886 posts
  • Location:Southeast Texas

Posted 21 October 2012 - 06:38 PM

Neat! No clue either, but jam or jelly jar?

#68 Emily_R

Emily_R
  • participating member
  • 881 posts

Posted 21 October 2012 - 06:51 PM

Love that Heidi - especially the threaded lid! Beautiful!

#69 Mjx

Mjx

    Senior Host

  • host
  • 6,102 posts

Posted 22 October 2012 - 12:22 AM

I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

079.JPG


Special presentation jar for sweets or some other specialty that doesn't require special preservation measures?

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Senior Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org


#70 thock

thock
  • participating member
  • 290 posts

Posted 22 October 2012 - 10:21 AM


That makes sense about the strainer thingy. So the cap and the strainer thingy would have both been part of the cocktail shaker?

Yes. There would have also been a (usually) tall container. See this video: <removed link (th)>
You really don't need the original matching container in order to use your strainer. You can use a large sturdy glass in place of a container as long as the strainer portion fits snugly atop the glass. As you shake this makeshift cocktail shaker, you just make sure you hold the strainer (and its closed lid) snugly to the glass portion so there won't be any leaks as you shake it.

Tracy, if you can rub the tarnish off the surface with your thumb, it's probably silver. The pieces will feel heavy in your hand, too . Look at the peices under a strong light, especially where they would rub when in use to spot wear and 'off' colours. If you see brass or copper under the worn areas, it's plated. HTH!


Thanks guys. It's very lightweight, so I'm pretty sure it's aluminum. It's nice to know I can use it with a glass or a jar.

Edited to remove video from quote.

Edited by thock, 22 October 2012 - 10:22 AM.

  • furzzy likes this
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#71 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,272 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 22 October 2012 - 06:02 PM

I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

079.JPG


Heidi, It looks like a pickle or jam "caster" jar. These usually were in sets of two or three and were held in silver or pewter "hangers" ..

Here's a page with a bunch, the style varied considerably, some open, many had lids.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#72 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 25 October 2012 - 12:35 PM

We are back in the land of incredible second-hand stores…the why is still a mystery to us.

Our first Sunday (50% off for seniors) shopping brought no amazing buys, but a good supply of stuff which we needed to augment the usual condo rental supply…a) because the condos are usually full of OHV-riding types who don’t cook and so they aren't stocked for cooking and b) because I am NOT going to ruin their spotless Paula Deen pots which I pack away while we are here.

Today’s visit to look for shelf making bits brought a cute treat; a bright red Quesadilla maker. One-purpose, totally unneeded, but cute as a button and only $4 (no % off today). So for lunch…because you have 24 hours to return electrical items if they don’t perform well enough…our first ever Quesadillas. Fun and they tasted good with cheese and Hatch chiles.P1010001_01.JPG
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#73 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,272 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 25 October 2012 - 02:14 PM

Nifty find, Darienne..
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#74 Porthos

Porthos
  • participating member
  • 1,081 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 27 October 2012 - 01:22 PM

I just found a NordicWare 8 x 4 loaf pan this morning in great shape for $1.50USD. The timing is just right. I needed a 8 x 4 loaf pan for the Tea Bread recipe Anna N posted in another thread last week. It's in the oven as I type.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Unrelenting Carnivore
"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#75 Margaret Pilgrim

Margaret Pilgrim
  • participating member
  • 1,436 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 27 October 2012 - 03:28 PM

I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

Super find! And if you only paid $10, you should feel guilt for robbing a vendor with whom you have a relationship! Threaded glass is very perishable, so to find a piece that is intact is in itself a coup. It's a lovely piece. I don't want to hazard dating it, but I would warn against screwing and unscrewing it unnecessarily (as in show and tell) because the threads do chip. (I remember being severely scolded at a flea market in France when testing just such jars.) Enjoy your treasure!
eGullet member #80.

#76 Margaret Pilgrim

Margaret Pilgrim
  • participating member
  • 1,436 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 27 October 2012 - 03:32 PM


I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

079.JPG


Heidi, It looks like a pickle or jam "caster" jar. These usually were in sets of two or three and were held in silver or pewter "hangers" ..

Here's a page with a bunch, the style varied considerably, some open, many had lids.


Castor jars usually had metal (silver plate, etc) lids and were not threaded. Threaded, in fact, is the operative descriptive word for this jar. I have seen them at French flea markets but have never asked their original use.
eGullet member #80.

#77 Margaret Pilgrim

Margaret Pilgrim
  • participating member
  • 1,436 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 27 October 2012 - 03:40 PM

Our gleanings so far this weekend: On my shopping list was baking soda, French working jars (the ones with the orange, red or green plastic lids and a double boiler large enough to hold dinner party quantities of mashed potatoes or polenta. Went to one estate sale where my husband unearthed 2 unopened boxes of arm and hammer with 2012 dates, a box of 12 working jars with 6 lids and a 2 qt Calphalon double boiler. Total price: $5.00. Raced to the car, yelling to husband, "Start the car, start the car!", channeling a local Ikea commercial in which the wife thinks they have mis-rung her purchases because her bill was so low.
eGullet member #80.

#78 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,272 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 27 October 2012 - 04:01 PM



I fell in love/lust with this heavy glass at the swap meet today. The lid is threaded and screws securely to the base - like a precursor to travel mugs. The glass can sit in the lid as a coaster app. The vendor had no clue. I overpaid at $10 but she often just gives me things so it was one of those balance of nature things. Any thoughts?

079.JPG


Heidi, It looks like a pickle or jam "caster" jar. These usually were in sets of two or three and were held in silver or pewter "hangers" ..

Here's a page with a bunch, the style varied considerably, some open, many had lids.


Castor jars usually had metal (silver plate, etc) lids and were not threaded. Threaded, in fact, is the operative descriptive word for this jar. I have seen them at French flea markets but have never asked their original use.


That's true that many did have metal lids, but many also had glass lids with ground-glass "seals" - similar to apothecary jars - I have a set of three in a silver carrier (high Victorian) inherited from my great grandmother with this type of lid and some were threaded. Without looking at these and checking the type of glass, I can't say for certain but threaded jars were available in Victorian times, including jars for cosmetics - one of my aunt collected those and donated her collection to some museum. I used to get in trouble when little by playing with them - thankfully I never broke anything.
I also have a glass caviar jar with threaded glass lid ca. 1920 - also inherited.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#79 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,739 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 27 October 2012 - 06:27 PM

Andie and Margaret - thanks for the info. I agree that opening and closing it too often is probably not a good idea. It is completely intact now. I will print out the info for the vendor in case she finds another. As for using it - I suppose as a display jar - will see what unfolds.

#80 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,497 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 27 October 2012 - 09:11 PM

Tracy, I love the pot strainer. That looks like a seriously useful tool.

#81 thock

thock
  • participating member
  • 290 posts

Posted 28 October 2012 - 09:03 AM

Tracy, I love the pot strainer. That looks like a seriously useful tool.


Oh, it IS! I love it. It's even better than the stainless one I got several years ago, new. I think the design of the handle makes for a more secure hold against the pot. I have used it at least once a day since I got it.

Andie, a while back, I got a brown bottle with a ground glass stopper. I was amazed that it sealed so well. I was very impressed. I don't have anything in it, now, but I'm wondering what it may have been used for, originally. I think it's an apothecary bottle. It's about 3-4 fl oz volume, I think (I don't have it in front of me). I'm thinking of just using it as a display piece, once the house is put back together.
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#82 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,272 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 28 October 2012 - 01:39 PM


Tracy, I love the pot strainer. That looks like a seriously useful tool.


Oh, it IS! I love it. It's even better than the stainless one I got several years ago, new. I think the design of the handle makes for a more secure hold against the pot. I have used it at least once a day since I got it.

Andie, a while back, I got a brown bottle with a ground glass stopper. I was amazed that it sealed so well. I was very impressed. I don't have anything in it, now, but I'm wondering what it may have been used for, originally. I think it's an apothecary bottle. It's about 3-4 fl oz volume, I think (I don't have it in front of me). I'm thinking of just using it as a display piece, once the house is put back together.


Bottles with ground glass stoppers have been used for chemicals, especially ones that would have held liquids that would have affected cork, rubber and other materials used for stopping bottles in the old days. Laboratories were still using ground glass stoppers in everything from tiny vials to big carboys as recently as fifteen years ago - the last time I was in a working lab. They may still be for all I know. Perfumers use them so that the essential oils and scents will not be affected by other materials. They seal so well that perfumes have kept for years without evaporating. They also look elegant.

Here are some.

Edited by andiesenji, 28 October 2012 - 01:41 PM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#83 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:37 PM

Sunday at Wabi Sabi. 50% off for over 55-year olds. And boy, are we over 55.

Bought a Breadman breadmaker for $6, just to use here for fun and then return when we leave. But back it goes tomorrow. Never had a loaf of bread stick in the container and have a thick, almost burnt crust. Used a never-fail recipe. Maybe that’s why it was turned in.

Picked up a few cookbooks, including three on Chinese Cooking. One by Ken Hom, Also Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook. A small El Paso Chile cookbook on tortillas, a Bon Appetit Special Occasion Desserts, and one called Garden Harvest Cookbook which has pages and pages on growing vegetables and herbs.
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#84 thock

thock
  • participating member
  • 290 posts

Posted 29 October 2012 - 05:53 AM



Tracy, I love the pot strainer. That looks like a seriously useful tool.


Oh, it IS! I love it. It's even better than the stainless one I got several years ago, new. I think the design of the handle makes for a more secure hold against the pot. I have used it at least once a day since I got it.

Andie, a while back, I got a brown bottle with a ground glass stopper. I was amazed that it sealed so well. I was very impressed. I don't have anything in it, now, but I'm wondering what it may have been used for, originally. I think it's an apothecary bottle. It's about 3-4 fl oz volume, I think (I don't have it in front of me). I'm thinking of just using it as a display piece, once the house is put back together.


Bottles with ground glass stoppers have been used for chemicals, especially ones that would have held liquids that would have affected cork, rubber and other materials used for stopping bottles in the old days. Laboratories were still using ground glass stoppers in everything from tiny vials to big carboys as recently as fifteen years ago - the last time I was in a working lab. They may still be for all I know. Perfumers use them so that the essential oils and scents will not be affected by other materials. They seal so well that perfumes have kept for years without evaporating. They also look elegant.

Here are some.


Way cool. Mine's brown and narrow-mouthed, but otherwise looks exactly the same as those. I have tea tree oil that makes rubber dropper bulbs deteriorate. I may use it for those,and have the dropper elsewhere,and rinse it out with rubbing alcohol between uses. Or maybe get the dropper bottle that I see on that website. I'll have to keep my eyes out for more of these. I'm a geek and a mechanical engineer, so I'm very curious about how they manufacture(d) the stoppers. I'll have to look that up,.

Edited by thock, 29 October 2012 - 05:57 AM.

Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#85 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 04 November 2012 - 05:37 PM

And it's Sunday again which means the old guys go to Wabi Sabi. Got a Waring Ice crusher for $1.50 for next summer's Dog Weekend's Margaritas. One use but not much of a footprint. The silliest chip and dip plate I've ever seen. Won't embarrass myself by posting a photo, also for the Dog Weekend.. Four more Bon Appetit hardbacks for my friend back home who is collecting them. At 50 cents a piece, I didn't bother checking whether she had these ones or not. Small muffin pan to give me 18 at a time.

Bought another breadmaker, Regal Ware, and am about to test it. It goes back when we leave. But in the meantime I make David Goldfarb's recipe for Challah to use in a Capirotada. Yeah, I know...
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#86 haresfur

haresfur
  • participating member
  • 1,127 posts
  • Location:Bendigo Australia

Posted 04 November 2012 - 07:16 PM

Way cool. Mine's brown and narrow-mouthed, but otherwise looks exactly the same as those. I have tea tree oil that makes rubber dropper bulbs deteriorate. I may use it for those,and have the dropper elsewhere,and rinse it out with rubbing alcohol between uses. Or maybe get the dropper bottle that I see on that website. I'll have to keep my eyes out for more of these. I'm a geek and a mechanical engineer, so I'm very curious about how they manufacture(d) the stoppers. I'll have to look that up,.

Ground glass stoppers are very cool but can freeze up and become impossible or nearly impossible to remove, particularly if they haven't been opened in a while or if something was put in hot and then allowed to cool.

Bendigo Pottery used to make clay 5 gallon bottles with threaded clay tops to hold chemicals like sulfuric acid. I'm amazed they could get the tops to fit and seal after firing.
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#87 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 11 November 2012 - 06:45 PM

Sunday once more at Wabi Sabi and the oldsters get 50% off. http://www.amazon.co..._product_top A dome cake/Zuccotto cake mold. $1.50. I don't know why. Picked it up because I didn't know what it was. Very well constructed. I'll have to try it out. A local friend has a birthday on Wednesday.

BTW, the Capirotada, made from my (last week's Wabi Sabi prize) bread machine-produced Challah, is delicious.

I'll never figure out how such a tiny and impecunious town has so much good second-hand items for sale. Lots of wealthy tourists, no doubt, but tourists don't leave Zuccotto molds behind when they leave.

Edited by Darienne, 11 November 2012 - 06:46 PM.

Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#88 thock

thock
  • participating member
  • 290 posts

Posted 13 November 2012 - 09:34 AM

Darienne,

It's funny how seeing something once will prime you to see it more readily in the future. I had to laugh, yesterday, when I visited a thrift store that I've never before visited, and saw not one, but TWO of those cake molds. They wanted something close to $8 for each of them. I don't need one, but I immediately thought of you.

The other day, I was at Goodwill, and I saw what appeared to be a round copper cake pan, maybe 8-9 inches in diameter, for about $3.00. I bought it, but I'm not really sure what it is or what it's for. It's not lined with tin, and has a half-rolled edge and a very rounded side-to-bottom corner. I'll take a picture, later, and post it.

Tracy
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#89 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,644 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:52 AM

Hi Tracy,

Sunday at Wabi Sabi is a longstanding tradition with us. The year we actually lived for 7 months in Moab, we had to furnish an empty house. It was an incredible experience...and then we had our first ever 'yard' sale and sold it all for what we paid for it and turned the rest back in.

I do make a 'Zucotto' type cake for birthdays, a chocolate cake filled with two chocolate mousses, then covered with another chocolate ganache and garnished with white chocolate curls. Fie kinds of chocolate with whipped cream and booze...what's not to like. I make the cake on a cookie sheet and then cut it up and line a bowl. Will this new pan make it easier? Or will it hit the Value Village back home?

Have fun with your copper pan.
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#90 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,272 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:18 AM

Darienne,

It's funny how seeing something once will prime you to see it more readily in the future. I had to laugh, yesterday, when I visited a thrift store that I've never before visited, and saw not one, but TWO of those cake molds. They wanted something close to $8 for each of them. I don't need one, but I immediately thought of you.

The other day, I was at Goodwill, and I saw what appeared to be a round copper cake pan, maybe 8-9 inches in diameter, for about $3.00. I bought it, but I'm not really sure what it is or what it's for. It's not lined with tin, and has a half-rolled edge and a very rounded side-to-bottom corner. I'll take a picture, later, and post it.

Tracy


Tracy, I have one of those unlined copper pans (Mauviel) which was called a "sponge" cake pan/jelly mold (for gelatin molds) when I bought it probably two decades ago - now they are called "contour cake pans". I've used it for a top layer in cakes that I wanted to cover with fondant because the round edge looks nice - at least in my opinion.
Wilton makes them, also Fat Daddio, others. Lloyd pans

I bought the pan in a gourmet shop here in Lancaster that closed in '98. They carried a lot of French cookware, specialty pans, copper molds, etc., not available anywhere else in my area.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening