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Dinner! 2013 (Part 3)


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#31 SobaAddict70

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 12:51 AM

thanks RRO/dcarch.

lots of great-looking stuff.

tonight -- a REALLY late dinner, just something I threw together in 15 minutes:

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Potato gnocchi, with black trumpet mushrooms, mousseron mushrooms, ramps and cabbage flower
 
Doable in about 15 minutes, including prep. Warm some olive oil, add some chopped ramp stalks, the black trumpet mushrooms and fairy ring (mousseron) mushrooms. Season with sea salt and black pepper. When the mushrooms are tender and the ramp stalks have started to brown, add the ramp leaves and chopped cabbage flower. Let the greens cook for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

While you're doing this, bring some lightly salted water to a boil, and drop in the potato gnocchi. The gnocchi, if they're freshly made, should take about 2-3 minutes to cook. When the gnocchi float to the top, lift out with a slotted spoon, then add to the pot with the ramp and mushroom mixture. Toss once or twice, taste for salt and pepper, then spoon into warmed serving bowls. Top with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, then serve immediately.

Also, take a look at the NYT op-ed article below when you get a chance.

http://www.nytimes.c...ok-at-home.html



#32 Mr Holloway

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 10:35 AM

Fantastic meals everyone

 Love, how the Dinner thread is now onto part 3 and it's only May :laugh:

 So many great pics

 

 A couple of quick meals from the grill

The Egg is easy enough, that I light, quick prep, shower, and cook a nice dinner for work

chickenandtaters.jpg

 

 Lamb, sweet tater fries, simple salad and homemade herb focaccia we are working on for Eggfest

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 Shane



#33 Keith_W

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 05:40 PM

Love, how the Dinner thread is now onto part 3 and it's only May :laugh:

It's my favourite thread on eG! I come here to perve at food porn and get ideas for what to cook next! Certainly some very interesting meals, e.g. Callinectes sapidus' green chile and the rice with the chilli, cheese and corn mixed through it. Intriguing.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#34 SobaAddict70

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 08:05 PM

shane -- I love your dinner; if only I had a balcony, then I could grill to my heart's content without setting off the smoke alarm.

tonight:

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Insalata di tonno e ceci -- spring greens (chickweed, fava greens), with Italian tuna and chickpeas.

You can use canned chickpeas (as is, drained and rinsed; or simmered for 20 minutes with 2 cups cold water, a pinch of sea salt, some sliced onion, carrot and celery, then drained) or prepared from dried (soak overnight in 4 cups cold water, then prepared with the onion/celery/carrot treatment). To the cooked, drained chickpeas, add good quality Italian tuna packed in olive oil, finely chopped red onion or shallots, lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil. Taste for salt and pepper. Spoon atop some greens, then serve immediately.

Fresh sardines make an excellent substitute for the tuna.


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Asparagus, eggs and cheese

Steam or simmer asparagus; fry an egg in unsalted butter, then serve over the asparagus. Spoon some freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese atop the asparagus and egg, and some melted butter. Taste for salt and pepper, then serve at once.

You don't need much else -- maybe a glass of white wine and some fruit.


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#35 Mr Holloway

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 02:49 PM

Thanks SobaAddict70

 I have to tell you,

 The Creamed mushroom bruschetta recipe has spread like wildfire here

Variations include provolone and now a much anticipated prosciutto wrap :laugh:

 

Thanks again for the recipe

 

 Shane



#36 Mr Holloway

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:00 PM

Hey Keith

 You are a great contributor here

 

 You are giving as much food porn as your taking :laugh:

 

 Shane



#37 SobaAddict70

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:58 PM

Shane -- it's not my recipe though. ;) thanks anyway.

tonight:

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One-egg omelette, baby cauliflower greens

The greens and shallots were cooked in olive oil, then dressed with a touch of sesame oil, red pepper flakes, sriracha, sea salt, black pepper and garlic chives.

One-egg omelette: one egg, 1 teaspoon cold water, sea salt and black pepper to taste. Prepare as you would a normal 2- or 3-egg omelette by frying in unsalted butter.


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Baby cauliflower and olive bruschetta

Cauliflower and olive confit -- chopped baby cauliflower, lemon juice, lemon zest, cumin, olive oil, shallots, capers, Moroccan oil-cured olives, rosemary. Simmer over low heat for one hour or until the cauliflower becomes as soft as baby food. Serve over toasted semolina bread or Italian bread.


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Crispy heirloom potatoes, black trumpet mushrooms, baby arugula

Potatoes -- parboil potatoes in lightly salted water for 5 minutes, then marinate in enough olive oil to cover along with fresh sage or oregano, for 15 to 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then roast at 350 F for 30 minutes.

The mushrooms and arugula were cooked in olive oil, with salt and pepper.


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Mussels steamed in Belgian beer, with ramps and pearl barley

Mussels -- steamed in Belgian beer for 3 minutes, then drained and shelled. Discard any mussels that do not open.

Pearl barley -- simmer 1/2 cup pearl barley in 1 1/2 cups Chinese chicken stock (chicken stock, garlic, ginger, scallions, sea salt) for 5 minutes on medium-high heat, then for 40 minutes on low heat or until all liquid is absorbed.

Ramps -- chopped ramp stalks and bulbs were sautéed in 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, to which was added the cooked pearl barley and chopped ramp leaves, slivered uncured Casalingo salami and the cooked mussels.

Taste for salt and pepper, drizzle with olive oil, then serve immediately.


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#38 Keith_W

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 05:34 AM

Aw, thanks Mr. Holloway :)

SobaAddict that omelette looks perfect, I have a hankering to make myself one right now!!

Oh yeah, where was I. Dinners!

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Last night's dinner. Panfried John Dory with a lemon-caper sauce with salad. Some of the salad was used as garnish, the rest was plunked into a big ugly bowl :)

original.jpg

Tonight's dinner. Duck breast with duck skin wafer, sauce Perigeux, mashed potato, and vegetables.

Duck breast: injected with a brine made from milk and apple juice, then sous-vide at 60C for 2 hours.

Duck skin wafer: stitched to a rack then brushed with soy sauce, paprika, and sugar. Allowed to dry in the fridge for 24 hours, then roasted at 180C for 30 minutes.

Sauce perigeux: madeira and truffle oil was added to beef stock, then reduced and thickened with a roux. Yes I know it is missing the foie gras, but I didn't have any. And I had to use truffle oil instead of truffles as well. Not truffle season yet!

Mashed potato: as per my "ultimate mashed potato" recipe ;)

Vegetables: microwaved. You will be surprised how good this simple cooking method is.

Edited by Keith_W, 15 May 2013 - 05:35 AM.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#39 Ranz

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 12:34 PM

Sous vide Short Ribs, 56.5C for around 42 hours. Was a bit more rare than I'd have liked, but the texture was very nice. I'll try again at around 59C soon.

 

Was finished under the broiler. Did quite a good job.

 

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#40 SobaAddict70

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 10:45 PM

tonight:

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Spring vegetable soup, with artichokes, peas and potatoes

For those of you who have "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking", this is on pages 85-87 of the 2012 edition.  If you don't have the book -- basically fry some garlic in olive oil, then add sliced potatoes.  Cook for 8-10 minutes over medium heat, covered; then add thinly sliced artichokes (that have been trimmed of their inedible parts, thorny tips, and fuzzy choke) and enough water to cover.  Simmer for 25-30 minutes on low heat.  Then stir in either fresh or frozen peas.  Cook for 10 minutes.  Taste for salt and pepper, stir in chopped parsley and serve immediately.  Not as substantial as a minestrone, nor as complex, but immensely satisfying.

 

patrick -- this is another example where water is preferable over stock or broth.

There's a slice of fried bread (slightly stale baguette fried in olive oil) on the bottom of the bowl.

 

keith -- ty


Edited by SobaAddict70, 15 May 2013 - 10:54 PM.


#41 C. sapidus

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:28 PM

Keith – Thanks! Your John Dory and duck look like wonderful meals.

 

Soba – Thanks for the pointer on the spring vegetable soup.

 

Garlic chicken – Baked with S&P, and then baked some more with a head of garlic pureed with olive oil and lime juice.

 

Mexican red rice – with white onion, roasted Poblano chiles, garlic, pureed tomato, chicken stock, and parsley. Unpictured green salad.

 

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#42 patrickamory

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 08:53 PM

Soba that spring vegetable soup looks perfect. Maybe I'll make it to USG this weekend. And thanks for the tip on the water instead of stock! Makes perfect sense for a fresh & delicate soup like this one.



#43 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:13 PM

patrick -- you'd enjoy it, I think.
 
c. sapidus -- great plate of chicken.
 
tonight:

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Dandelion greens and kohlrabi "bread salad" -- dandelion greens, kohlrabi, dried cranberries, croutons, saffron, red chile flakes, olive oil, lemon juice, cranberry soaking liquid.

The cranberries were briefly soaked in hot water (which had a few saffron threads in it).

Can't wait for tomatoes to start appearing...


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Spaghetti with ramps, asparagus, peas and bacon



#44 liuzhou

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 05:22 PM

Last night. Stir fried crab and clams. Served with wilted baby bok choy and rice.

 

crab and clam.jpg



#45 Franci

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:18 PM

Liuzhou, we would have really liked your crab and clams. How do you stir fry them?

 

So, full of spring your dishes, Soba! I hope you are going to give me tips on where is best to buy in USGM, we are moving back in Sept/Oct to Brooklyn.

 

Yesterday night we had

 

Beef carpaccio

 


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Celeriac Rosti with tzaziki

 

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and Turkish fava beans with dill. Plus a salad not pictured and some toasted garlicky bread

 

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previous nights. No fancy food, pretty basic food

 

potatoes croquettes

 

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friggitelli and some fried mackerel (oh, this was terrible, how I miss good Cornish mackerel ). Not sure if friggitelli are the same as pimentos de padron, think so. I grew up eating them.

 

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Some left over polenta and oyester mushrooms (which my 2 years old daughter loves!)

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pork skewers

 

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and some roasted eggplants. Wanted to do the miso spread, Prawncrackers reminded me of this tasty dish,  but was running short of time...next time.

 

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Edited by Franci, 17 May 2013 - 11:20 PM.


#46 liuzhou

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:55 PM

Liuzhou, we would have really liked your crab and clams. How do you stir fry them?

 

I fried up some garlic (a lot) and an equal amount of grated ginger and one chopped Thai style chile. As soon as they get fragrant the crabs go in. They are these little blue crabs. The crab girl in the local market cuts them up and removes the nasty bits, so I save a job.

 

Blue crabs.jpg

 

When they start to turn red I add a slug of soy sauce and a similarly sized slug of oyster sauce (a slug is the technical term for about half as much as my wok stirrer can hold - sorry, I'm not a measurer). About the same time I add the clams.

 

When the crab meat is white rather than translucent and the clams have opened,  I declare everything to be cooked, add a quarter slug of sesame oil and a handful of chopped scallions.

 

Taste. Sometimes they don't need salt. Sometimes they do. Adjust as required.

 

Then serve.

 

Then eat. 

 

The picture I posted didn't have the sauce on them. How silly of me. This is a delightfully messy dish to eat. You got to get in there with fingers and get messy!

 

Then take a shower.


 

 
 


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#47 Simon Lewinson

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 01:43 AM

Dinner today was porcini fettucini with duck confit and pea ragu. The duck confit was from my first attempt a couple of weeks ago and was a bit salty. Pairing it with the baby peas added some sweetness to offset some of the saltiness. The porcini fetuccini was made with 20% of the flour replaced with ground dried porcini .

I still need to work on my plating skills.

image.jpg

Edited by Simon Lewinson, 18 May 2013 - 01:44 AM.


#48 mm84321

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 05:12 AM


I still need to work on my plating skills.
 

 

I think it looks fine. I mean, it is what it is: a bowl of pasta. It would probably look silly, or at least less honest, plated otherwise. What I would suggest you working on, however, are new plates.  :smile:



#49 Keith_W

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 06:30 AM

I still need to work on my plating skills.

It's OK, so do I. I have found a little trick though. I cook up enough food for us to eat. Then I plate up a dainty little portion, because they look nicer. Once the photo is taken, I pile on the food and eat!
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#50 rotuts

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 06:30 AM

croquettes

 

second only to Fried Calamari !

 

Yum !



#51 huiray

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 09:13 AM

mm84321, on 18 May 2013 - 08:16, said:snapback.png

Simon Lewinson, on 18 May 2013 - 04:47, said:snapback.png


I still need to work on my plating skills.
 

 

I think it looks fine. I mean, it is what it is: a bowl of pasta. It would probably look silly, or at least less honest, plated otherwise. What I would suggest you working on, however, are new plates.   :smile:

 

Keith_W, on 18 May 2013 - 09:34, said:snapback.png

Simon Lewinson, on 18 May 2013 - 04:47, said:snapback.png

I still need to work on my plating skills

It's OK, so do I. I have found a little trick though. I cook up enough food for us to eat. Then I plate up a dainty little portion, because they look nicer. Once the photo is taken, I pile on the food and eat!

 

I think that plate of pasta looks just fine.  The plate itself would not have been my personal choice, true, but that is just my personal taste.  I'm sure you like it a lot yourself.  :-) 

 

Perhaps this old article might also be of interest: 

http://www.gourmet.c...8/frenchlaundry

 

Quote from there:

" They are also mystified by the custom of serving tiny,personal portions of food on enormous white plates..."

 

 

I myself personally think the practice of daintily arranging food in just-so compositions with one or two components in what has been called "Tweezer Food" to be, uh, not what an ordinary meal would look like.  Per Se and their ilk might do it and charge astronomical sums of money for the TINY amounts of food they serve on those enormous platters but I for one would not care too much for that at home.  Or for that matter in most restaurants I would go to, excepting when I am in the (rare) mood for that sort of Tweezer Food.  But that's just me.



#52 mm84321

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:56 AM

I mostly agree. Tweezed food can look nice at times, if done right, but more often than not, it just looks silly. Per se and The French Laundry are fine examples of this silliness (or perhaps "frilly" is the right word). When I ate at Per se, the plates were all painfully composed, unfortunately, this did not prevent my lamb and lobster from being overcooked, nor my monkfish from having no taste or my foie gras from being as bland as a manilla folder. Anyway, the best looking food comes not from the plate nor the arrangement, but the overall precision in technique. And less is usually more. 



#53 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 02:34 PM

Been a while and I'm slacking on taking pictures of my stuff.

 

As always everything looks delicious!


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#54 Mr Holloway

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 02:56 PM

Post some food porn and all is forgiven :laugh:



#55 Mr Holloway

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 02:59 PM

Agreed

 Everything looks amazing guys :smile:

 

 Shane



#56 mm84321

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 03:02 PM

xxgQfFTl.png
Salmon with pigeon consommé
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#57 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 03:05 PM

mm - I can't believe you had such a bummer meal at 2 of his places. It always blows my mind when a Michelin starred spot it completely underwhelming.

 

Maybe when spots think they can do no wrong they get a little lazy. Need to have a star taken away to light a fire under their ass.

 

Edit:

 

-Salmon season is in full swing and that looks awesome.


Edited by ScottyBoy, 18 May 2013 - 03:06 PM.

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#58 SobaAddict70

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 04:19 PM

I still need to work on my plating skills.

It's OK, so do I. I have found a little trick though. I cook up enough food for us to eat. Then I plate up a dainty little portion, because they look nicer. Once the photo is taken, I pile on the food and eat!

 

agreed. 

 

also, with respect to mm's comment on your "plates", one of the best investments I ever made was to take a little shopping trip to Bed Bath & Beyond and pick up some white dishware.  since I'm a bachelor, I eat mostly out of bowls, and since my kitchen is hobbit-sized, that means that a deep bowl does double duty as soup bowl, pasta bowl, salad bowl or a whatever bowl.  LOL.  I'm sure you get the idea.  if you don't have a BBB in your city, any thrift shop or kitchenware store will serve.  plain white is best because there's less "contrast/busyness" which directs the viewer's eye to the food.  you'll notice how mm's plates -- I mean the vessels he or she serves his food in -- have barely any designs on them. 

 

that being said, my secret dream is to have a prop "pantry" similar to what Martha Stewart's staff has for Martha Stewart Living.  there must literally be like a thousand different pieces of dishware, all individually labelled and entered into a bar code/database system.  heh.

 

hope that helps.



#59 patrickamory

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 05:01 PM

Back to the future with my mom's meatloaf recipe from when I was growing up in the '70s.
 

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#60 Dejah

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 05:22 PM

After a month in Malaysia and 2 weeks in China, having just gotten back on Wed,  and now under the weather with a lousy cold , I finally got around to cooking a meal at home.

 

Maybe it's the cold, but the lamb didn't have much lamb flavour or the cumin I rubbed on it. But, it was still good, moist and tender, along with mint sauce, jeera and cardamon basmati rice, carrots and asparagus.

 

1st meal home Lamb1157.jpg


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