Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Good alternative to crisps?


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 bobjad21

bobjad21
  • participating member
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 March 2013 - 03:04 AM

Hi everyone, this is my first post on here! :D

basically i have started eating much better and started going to the gym etc, 

but i have one weakness and thats bbq flavour crisps. 

they are my favourite snack and i know they are really bad for me, 

is there an alternative snack thats good for me, but still tastes really good,

i can't find anything in my local tesco that doesnt cost like £5 a bag such as pistachios. 

something similair price to a normal bag of walkers crisps. 

cheers, Jad. :)

 



#2 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,544 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 19 March 2013 - 05:04 AM

You gotta face facts - there is no good alternative to "crisps."

 

Have an apple.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#3 Mjx

Mjx
  • manager
  • 6,368 posts

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:11 AM

Oh, I don't know; I just had a bag of baked rice chips, actually got them because I thought they looked tasty (they were). Unless you're eating rather a lot of them, I really don't think crisps are that bad for you (unless one of the ingredients is being a problem).


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org


#4 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,699 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:45 AM

TJ's has their own brand of Vegetable Chips low salt to boot.  but not BBQ.  also they have sweet potato chips but I cant recall the salt content nor the flavor.

 

look for those in your local version.  check the fat and the salt content.



#5 HungryC

HungryC
  • participating member
  • 1,503 posts
  • Location:greater New Orleans

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:50 AM

Not sure if you can get them across the pond, but my "crisps" alternative is Kettle brand "Bakes" chips.  Baked instead of fried, but unlike other fried chips, made from real potatoes (instead of the typical baked chip made of dehydrated potatoes).  http://www.kettlebra...s_chips/?pid=19

The entire 4 oz bag is about 500 calories, so you can have a mini-binge and it won't ruin your diet.  Or eat a big handful and it's around 150 calories.  I pair them with dip made from nonfat greek (aka drained) yogurt....it's a pretty spot-on substitute for your usual greasy chip-n-dip.

 

In the non crisps department, a typical US snack at the same price range but a bit healthier (more protein) is dry roasted peanuts.



#6 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,710 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:10 AM

Popcorn might work.  A big bowl freshly made popcorn with a soupçon of olive oil, salted, peppered, Chipotle powder or some B-B-Q-like spices, a packet of Stevia or some other benign no-sugar product or a bit of sugar.  Salty, sweet, and hot.  What could be better?


Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#7 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,544 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:07 AM

But seriously, how are any of these (baked rice chips  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh: ) as good as "crisps?"

 

Just face it, we eat these things because they're "healthier" or we like to think we're being virtuous, but nothing is as good as a real

potato chip.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#8 Baselerd

Baselerd
  • participating member
  • 460 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:14 AM

There's no substitute for good old fats and oils that will taste as good. I personally like to have dehydrated/freeze dried vegetable/fruits if I'm in a healthy mood - but I wouldn't say they taste as good as potato chips.



#9 Beebs

Beebs
  • participating member
  • 704 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:15 AM

Most supermarkets and drugstores here are carrying a good selection of non-potato chips/crisps - lentil chips, hummus/chickpea, sweet potato corn chips, black bean, whole grain, brown rice, etc.  A lot of these aren't fried either.  They're obviously not potato chips and certainly don't taste like them either, but some of them are pretty good if you're not expecting them to taste like a deep-fried potato chip.  Of course, if you over-eat on these, it's probably not healthy for you, either.....



#10 pastrygirl

pastrygirl
  • society donor
  • 1,136 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA USA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:32 AM

Jad, welcome to EG. I started working out with a personal trainer and watching what I eat about 2 months ago and it has really been working. I have lost weight and feel so much better. What I like about my trainer's approach to diet is that nothing is forbidden, it is more about tracking food and exercise (I use My Fitness Pal iphone app), eating regularly to stay satisfied, plenty of protein and fruit & veg, and portion control. If you don't already have one, get a digital kitchen scale so if you want those crisps or other junk food you can weigh out exactly 1 ounce or 100 calories or whatever. I'm finding that when I go to work out and see how much effort on the elliptical or treadmill it takes to burn off 200 calories, dessert (my weakness) is a lot less alluring. Good luck!

#11 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,699 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:45 AM

" snacks " = salt and fat.   thats just the way it is. two of the three major 'food' groups right there.  add a bit of sugar to get to that 'sweet' BBQ flavor and youve got all three of the groups right there!

 

then take a look at the 'tread-mill' calcualtions to burn off 200 cals.  its and eye popper assuming they dont cheat.



#12 Ozcook

Ozcook
  • participating member
  • 41 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:37 PM

What about some BBQ flavoured jerky? Not the supermarket rubbish, I mean home-made.



#13 HungryC

HungryC
  • participating member
  • 1,503 posts
  • Location:greater New Orleans

Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:49 PM

But seriously, how are any of these (baked rice chips  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh: ) as good as "crisps?"

 

Just face it, we eat these things because they're "healthier" or we like to think we're being virtuous, but nothing is as good as a real

potato chip.

Have you tried the Kettle baked chips?  They are a very respectable snack chip, with no fake ingredients.  Every bit as good as a thick cut fried chip, with way way way less fat.  I'm a Kettle Bakes evangelist....I would like them in more flavors, so I'm trying to help Kettle expand its market share.



#14 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,544 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 19 March 2013 - 12:56 PM

But seriously, how are any of these (baked rice chips  :laugh:  :laugh:  :laugh: ) as good as "crisps?"

 

Just face it, we eat these things because they're "healthier" or we like to think we're being virtuous, but nothing is as good as a real

potato chip.

Have you tried the Kettle baked chips?  They are a very respectable snack chip, with no fake ingredients. 

 

Not yet, but I will.  I think the Whole Foods where I shop has the whole line of Kettle.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#15 huiray

huiray
  • society donor
  • 2,099 posts
  • Location:Indiana, USA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 07:25 PM

I think baked chips simply cannot match the real ones deep fried in oil (or lard!) and seasoned w/ salt insofar potato chips (or crisps, in the UK - where the OP appears to be located) are concerned.  Rice crackers (especially w/ sesame seeds) are OK, but they need to have been done properly, not in those "oh-so-healthful" ways.  I'd just eat the saturated-fat+salt stuff, just less of them - like, not a bag a day everyday.  :wink: :biggrin:    Y'know what they say, "Everything in moderation". :smile: 



#16 janeer

janeer
  • participating member
  • 1,255 posts

Posted 19 March 2013 - 08:26 PM

I think baked chips simply cannot match the real ones deep fried in oil (or lard!) and seasoned w/ salt insofar potato chips (or crisps, in the UK - where the OP appears to be located) are concerned.  Rice crackers (especially w/ sesame seeds) are OK, but they need to have been done properly, not in those "oh-so-healthful" ways.  I'd just eat the saturated-fat+salt stuff, just less of them - like, not a bag a day everyday.  :wink: :biggrin:    Y'know what they say, "Everything in moderation". :smile:

Agree; real chips in moderation; cannot abide the baked or the rice cakes. Chile pistachios are excellent, but fattening in their own way. If you want something really crisp and spicey, with no fat, try jicama with chile and lime. It's good. But my basic rule is: do not deny yourself anything. Life is short.



#17 judiu

judiu
  • participating member
  • 2,245 posts
  • Location:South Florida

Posted 23 March 2013 - 05:56 PM

Do you get Calbee products in the UK ? Their pea crisps are amazing; light, crispy, not greasy at all! Not cheap, per se, but not out of sight, either...
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

#18 Plantes Vertes

Plantes Vertes
  • participating member
  • 894 posts

Posted 30 March 2013 - 11:48 PM

You can roast chickpeas as a snack; heat the oven to gas mark 8, put the chickpeas on a baking sheet, drizzle on a little olive oil and add whatever seasoning you like (cayenne pepper is nice, or smoked paprika would resemble the bbq flavour). Cook them for 1/2hr-40mins.

 

There are also kale chips, which I expect are dear to buy, but you can make them at home; Preheat the oven to gas mark 4, remove the stems and wash the leaves then drain, put the kale on a baking sheet, drizzle with a little olive oil and mix to spread over the leaves, add your preferred seasonings (chilli flakes are good); bake for 10-15mins.

 

I have heard that eating excessive salt decreases your sensitivity to it, so as you reduce your intake you'll probably crave salt less.

 

And congrats on your diet change!



#19 ePressureCooker

ePressureCooker
  • participating member
  • 60 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, California

Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:18 PM

You can roast chickpeas as a snack; heat the oven to gas mark 8, put the chickpeas on a baking sheet, drizzle on a little olive oil and add whatever seasoning you like (cayenne pepper is nice, or smoked paprika would resemble the bbq flavour). Cook them for 1/2hr-40mins.

 

There are also kale chips, which I expect are dear to buy, but you can make them at home; Preheat the oven to gas mark 4, remove the stems and wash the leaves then drain, put the kale on a baking sheet, drizzle with a little olive oil and mix to spread over the leaves, add your preferred seasonings (chilli flakes are good); bake for 10-15mins.

 

I have heard that eating excessive salt decreases your sensitivity to it, so as you reduce your intake you'll probably crave salt less.

 

And congrats on your diet change!

 

I've seen a similar thing to your kale chips recipe done with swiss chard / beet leaves as well.

 

And I can also speak personally to the salt reduction issue PV mentioned: I've really tried to reduce my intake of commercially prepared food to virtually nothing.  Gave up fast food, rarely buy anything pre-made, virtually no canned goods - they're all full of TONS of salt, often low fat or low calorie products are the worst offenders, because they compensate for the lost flavor from fat by adding more salt.  An occasional can of enchilada sauce, some canned broth here and there, that's pretty much it for me at this point.  At first, I craved salt.  Boy, did I crave salt.  But after a while, I grew far more sensitive to salt - if I tried to eat cheetos, OMG, they are almost unbearably salty.  Before, they tasted completely normal to me, now, damn salty.  This is how I know when I'm being good on the salt front or when I've been lapsing, if I taste a commercial product and don't think "Geez, that's incredibly salty!" then I know I need to get back on the salt wagon.  My taste buds give me all the clues I need to know how good I've been (or not been) on the salt front lately.



#20 Katie Meadow

Katie Meadow
  • participating member
  • 1,341 posts
  • Location:Bay Area / East Bay

Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:30 PM

Everyone must figure out their own way toward a healthy diet, or at least a diet that works well for them. I have a couple of annoying health issues that have required me to cut back on all kinds of food that I love. I rarely eat chips any more, but when I do, I want really good ones, not a substitute. As long as I know I can have anything on the planet if only as a rare treat, I'm okay with not eating anything that tries to be something better. I would rather have my favorite chips once a month than have something not as good more often. When it comes to salty snacking (and I have cut back on salt in the last few years as well) I like organic popcorn popped on the stove, then sprinkled with a moderate amount of good quality salt. I've now discovered smoked maldon salt (super strong), so I'm using just a little bit of that with my other salt to make "campfire" popcorn. Maybe that would go partway toward a BBQ flavor. Smoked paprika on fries (chips to the op) or on potato salad also makes its own party. Before I had to cut back on cheese I liked to put a little grated parm or pecorino on my popcorn and that was pretty fun.

 

I found salt to be the easiest thing to cut back; it's very common to develop a lower tolerance for salt over a relatively short period of time. The down side is that you become so sensitized that it's hard to eat out. Forget processed or fast foods--some really pricey restaurants use a ton of salt.



#21 orangeong2

orangeong2
  • participating member
  • 10 posts

Posted 30 May 2013 - 07:54 PM

Everyone must figure out their own way toward a healthy diet, or at least a diet that works well for them. I have a couple of annoying health issues that have required me to cut back on all kinds of food that I love. I rarely eat chips any more, but when I do, I want really good ones, not a substitute. As long as I know I can have anything on the planet if only as a rare treat, I'm okay with not eating anything that tries to be something better. I would rather have my favorite chips once a month than have something not as good more often. When it comes to salty snacking (and I have cut back on salt in the last few years as well) I like organic popcorn popped on the stove, then sprinkled with a moderate amount of good quality salt. I've now discovered smoked maldon salt (super strong), so I'm using just a little bit of that with my other salt to make "campfire" popcorn. Maybe that would go partway toward a BBQ flavor. Smoked paprika on fries (chips to the op) or on potato salad also makes its own party. Before I had to cut back on cheese I liked to put a little grated parm or pecorino on my popcorn and that was pretty fun.

 

I found salt to be the easiest thing to cut back; it's very common to develop a lower tolerance for salt over a relatively short period of time. The down side is that you become so sensitized that it's hard to eat out. Forget processed or fast foods--some really pricey restaurants use a ton of salt.

 

http://voices.yahoo....163.html?cat=51

u may refer to this link. Too bad they dont have this in Malaysia as I'm also a chip addict. It's like my energy supply everytime I feel empty stomach. I know it's not healthy but i just couldnt resist them!