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Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (Part 2)

Modernist Cookbook

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165 replies to this topic

#151 patmatrix

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 01:34 PM

Made the white beef stock, was amazing!! Used that to make the pho soup. Added 5g of fish sauce and 5g more of the ginger and 10 less on the sugar amount and it was fantastic!!


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#152 patmatrix

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:25 AM

Made the Carnitas last night,

 

Made the pork stock, Achiote paste (garlic confit), whole shoulder of pork.

 

Was delicious!!

 

 

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#153 Chris Hennes

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 05:59 PM

It's been a while since I've cooked from MC@H, but with dinner tonight I decided to make the @H version of the potato purée, in particular the one where you infuse the skins in cream. I made a number of modifications to the recipe: I used red-skinned potatoes of some kind rather than Yukon Gold, I cut the amount of butter in half, and I infused the cream sous vide at the same time I was retrograding the potatoes rather than doing it in a separate step. The result was fantastic: still rich, though not quite as in-your-face as the full-butter version, and with a really terrific potato flavor.


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#154 paulraphael

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 10:53 AM

What size pressure cookers are people find most useful for making stocks? For conventional stocks I've started with a 22qt pot and gotten a yield of around 6 quarts. What cooker would make sense for a yield of 5 or 6 quarts?



#155 btbyrd

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:36 PM

You shouldn't fill a pressure cooker more than half full with liquid, so you're going to get into pressure canner territory if you want to make that much stock at once. Unless you plan on getting into canning, I'd advise against investing in such a large unit. It'd be much better to just get a 10 or 12 quart pressure cooker and just make two batches of stock. It'll still be much faster than using a stock pot and you'll have a stock with a lot more body and flavor to boot!



#156 Chris Hennes

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:50 PM

I don't recommend using a pressure canner for making stock at all, at least not an aluminum one. I don't care for the taste of things actually cooked directly in the canner, and my one experiment with making stock directly in it resulted in my throwing out the entire batch.


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#157 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 03:54 PM

In a pressure cooker you really only need to just cover the bones and stuff with water.....it'll make a concentrated stock that you can dilute if you wish.

The stainless steel pressure cookers that I have (I don't cook directly in my aluminum canners) can be filled 2/3 full as long as it's something that won't foam-up.

I have 3-liter, 5-liter and 10-liter. 

Something else I've done is put a large stainless steel container surrounded by water in my 22-quart canner for large batches of stock.


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#158 slkinsey

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 08:38 AM

I don't recommend using a pressure canner for making stock at all, at least not an aluminum one. I don't care for the taste of things actually cooked directly in the canner, and my one experiment with making stock directly in it resulted in my throwing out the entire batch.

Interesting, I haven't had any issues like that at all and regularly use my aluminum WAFCO pressure canner to make stock.  I wouldn't think a stock would have enough acidity to make reactivity much of an issue.  I'm pretty sensitive to metallic flavors, too.


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#159 Chris Hennes

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 10:21 AM

Interesting: I wonder if it's a defect in my canner (or my care for it?). It's not a subtle thing, the smell is quite bad. I've got the Presto canner.


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#160 slkinsey

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 01:59 PM

Who knows?  Could be made of a different kind of aluminum alloy.  Different surface treatment.  Something else.


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#161 HowardLi

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 08:45 PM

Did anyone have trouble with the Korean-style chicken wings? I found that the marinade had way too much oil in it for the batter to properly form after the addition of the dry goods.



#162 jzhu

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 11:53 AM

Did anyone have trouble with the Korean-style chicken wings? I found that the marinade had way too much oil in it for the batter to properly form after the addition of the dry goods.

 

HowardLi,

 

When you add the starch to the marinade to make the batter, the wings and the mixture need to be mixed until the batter is fully emulsified.  If there are still visible spots of oil in the batter, then it is not mixed enough.  Once the batter is emulsified, it should stick to the wings better, and be ready for frying.

 

Johnny


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#163 Chris Hennes

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 12:16 PM

Did anyone have trouble with the Korean-style chicken wings? I found that the marinade had way too much oil in it for the batter to properly form after the addition of the dry goods.

I posted about them over in the "Cooking with Modernist Cuisine at Home" discussion: they turned out very well.


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#164 HowardLi

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 03:55 PM

HowardLi,

When you add the starch to the marinade to make the batter, the wings and the mixture need to be mixed until the batter is fully emulsified. If there are still visible spots of oil in the batter, then it is not mixed enough. Once the batter is emulsified, it should stick to the wings better, and be ready for frying.

Johnny

Johnny,

Thanks, that makes sense. But if such mixing is critical to the success of the recipe, and it appears to be so, shouldn't the marinade then be drained (and added back later) so that the emulsification be done more readily?

Two more questions: what is the emulsifying agent, and what purpose does the oil in the marinade serve?

Edited by HowardLi, 20 March 2014 - 03:56 PM.


#165 jzhu

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 04:42 PM

Johnny,

Thanks, that makes sense. But if such mixing is critical to the success of the recipe, and it appears to be so, shouldn't the marinade then be drained (and added back later) so that the emulsification be done more readily?

Two more questions: what is the emulsifying agent, and what purpose does the oil in the marinade serve?

 

HowardLi,

 

If it were particularly hard to get the batter emulsified, then yes you could slowly add the marinade back like emulsifying a mayonnaise.  But, it's not.  One minute of rigorous mixing is sufficient. 

 

There is no emulsifying agent.  The emulsification is mechanical.  The starch will help hold the emulsion long enough to fry, but if you let the wings sit in the batter long enough, the batter will break.

 

The oil in the marinade is first and foremost for flavor.  As you have read it is peanut oil.  But, secondly it assists with the technique of "Velveting", whereby we try to insulate the meat from the high temperature oil while we cook it.  We have simply found that the meat is more tender when we do it this way.

 

Now, that is not to say that you couldn't reduce the amount of oil, or eliminate it completely.  It may very well work to your liking with that adjustment.  I would, however, hold back a bit of the salt or soy if you do so, as the wings might over-marinate in the saltier solution (with oil removed) and become cured or "hammy". 

 

Hope that helps.

 

Johnny


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#166 lordratner

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 11:12 AM

I made the hamburger patty today after getting my meat grinder delivered. Just the patty, and I didn't follow the recipe closely, but some observations, from most to least noticeable.

 

- Using meats like short rib and chuck (the two I used today) produce a burger with so much more taste than what you normally get in store bought ground beef, it's almost a different food entirely. In fact, eating the test run without bread, cheese, veggies, ketchup or mustard was easier than I thought, The patty had enough flavor to be a course on its own, but had enough flavor to avoid getting lost when I dumped jalepenos, cheese, and A-1 sauce on it.

- Deep frying meat for the maillard effect is amazing. I already knew this from trying it with steaks, but the much rougher surface of a ground patty provides for a more stunning visual effect. Cutting into the burger and seeing the deep red medium rare contrast with the crusty brown of the outside is unexpected for a quick homemade first attempt.

- Getting the myosin out with salt is a very cool trick, and it allows for a much "looser" burger without having the patty fall apart.

- A-1 sauce is a damn good burger topping.

 

I'm excited to try different combinations of meat. I'm guessing the meat loaf is going to be pretty tasty too. Definitely alleviated any doubts I had about getting the grinder in the first place.







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