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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2007–2008)


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#331 eje

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Posted 06 June 2008 - 10:17 PM

I'm still experimenting with it in cocktails, but the Osocalis Brandy makes a pretty darn interesting Sazerac. Chewy.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#332 eje

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 09:08 AM

Posted Image

Income Tax Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (1/4 quarter valencia orange squeezed right over the tin)
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Broker's Dry Gin)

Shake (haha, stir!) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange Peel.)

I know I sometimes bang on about the Brooklyn* variations as the cocktails in the Savoy which I am most tired of. But this was really good. A nice stiff gin, a beautiful fresh valencia orange, generous portion of bitters, decent dry and sweet vermouth.

When this cocktail is good, it is hard to beat!

*This should say "bang on about the Bronx variations". How embarrassing. The Brooklyn is a lovely drink all of it's own with Whiskey, Vermouth, Maraschino, and Amer Picon. No Orange Juice involved.

Edited by eje, 07 June 2008 - 02:04 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
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#333 slkinsey

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 01:31 PM

I know I sometimes bang on about the Brooklyn variations as the cocktails in the Savoy which I am most tired of.  But this was really good.  A nice stiff gin, a beautiful fresh valencia orange, generous portion of bitters, decent dry and sweet vermouth.

I think there may be some borough confusion. Isn't the Income Tax cocktail a variation on the Bronx, and not the Brooklyn?
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#334 eje

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 02:02 PM

I know I sometimes bang on about the Brooklyn variations as the cocktails in the Savoy which I am most tired of.  But this was really good.  A nice stiff gin, a beautiful fresh valencia orange, generous portion of bitters, decent dry and sweet vermouth.

I think there may be some borough confusion. Isn't the Income Tax cocktail a variation on the Bronx, and not the Brooklyn?

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Ack! You are, of course, correct sir! How embarrassing!
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Erik Ellestad
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#335 eje

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 09:17 AM

Posted Image

Inca Cocktail

1 Dash Orgeat Syrup. (1/3 tsp homemade)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (dash Fee's, Dash Regan's Orange Bitters)
1/4 Gin. (3/4 oz Junipero Gin)
1/4 Sherry. (3/4 oz Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry)
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Orange Peel.)

Apparently, I am crazy for liking this cocktail. I tried it a while ago for myself and thought it a really cool puzzle of tastes. I gave one to Mrs. eje to try. Interestingly, her first impression was that it was a whiskey cocktail, but she also liked it.

Then I sent the recipe to a few friends. Crickets. I sent the recipe to some bartenders I know. The silence was deafening.

I made it again a couple other times, including tonight, and still think it rocks.

I do have to say I over-squooshed my almonds when making the orgeat, thus the kind of dottiness to the almond oils and solids in the cold cocktail. Still tasty despite the somewhat unappealing appearance.

Robert Vermeire tells us, "This cocktail was invented by H.C. Harrison, who supervises the American Bars of the Gordon Hotels in England."
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#336 bostonapothecary

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 10:05 AM

Posted Image

Inca Cocktail

1 Dash Orgeat Syrup. (1/3 tsp homemade)
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (dash Fee's, Dash Regan's Orange Bitters)
1/4 Gin. (3/4 oz Junipero Gin)
1/4 Sherry. (3/4 oz Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry)
1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.  (Orange Peel.)

Apparently, I am crazy for liking this cocktail.  I tried it a while ago for myself and thought it a really cool puzzle of tastes.  I gave one to Mrs. eje to try.  Interestingly, her first impression was that it was a whiskey cocktail, but she also liked it.

Then I sent the recipe to a few friends.  Crickets.  I sent the recipe to some bartenders I know.  The silence was deafening.

I made it again a couple other times, including tonight, and still think it rocks.

I do have to say I over-squooshed my almonds when making the orgeat, thus the kind of dottiness to the almond oils and solids in the cold cocktail.  Still tasty despite the somewhat unappealing appearance.

Robert Vermeire tells us, "This cocktail was invented by H.C. Harrison, who supervises the American Bars of the Gordon Hotels in England."

View Post


that is a high maintenance drink to construct but it looks like my style... it could kick off some introspective contemplation... a companion for heavy reading, or is it simpler than it seems?
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#337 eje

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 04:53 PM

that is a high maintenance drink to construct but it looks like my style... it could kick off some introspective contemplation... a companion for heavy reading, or is it simpler than it seems?

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It almost has enough ingredients to be a tiki drink.... But now that I mention that, it is a bit like the Fog Cutter, is it not?

If you used Rum and Cognac in place of the vermouths. And orange juice in place of the orange bitters (Trader Vic was bitters-phobic, anyway...)
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#338 hannnah

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Posted 08 June 2008 - 07:14 PM

The only references I can google for Ichbien are drink recipes.

"Ich" of course being "I" in Germain.

"Bien" being something like "good" in French?

It could be mis-spelled, I suppose...

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My first guess as far as misspelling would be "Ich dien," which appears on the crest of the Prince of Wales - German for "I serve." The Prince of Wales cocktail does have brandy and curacao, so maybe this started out as a variant?
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#339 eje

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 01:10 PM

Posted Image

Ink Street Cocktail

1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (3/4 oz 40 Creek Barrel Select, 1/4 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon)
1/3 Orange Juice. (1 oz fresh valencia Orange Juice)
1/3 Lemon Juice. (1 oz fresh Lemon Juice)

Shake well then strain into cocktail glass.

Taking perfumekev's advice to heart, I did a little on-the-fly blending, in an attempt to juice up the 40 creek.

Definitely seems to lend a bit more character in the drink, to the point where I can actually taste the whisk(e)y, which probably wouldn't have been the case with just the 40 Creek.

In regards the drink, 3 oz is a little large. Where 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 oz would have been a bracing tonic that you could throw back in a single go, at 3 oz, the Ink Street gets a bit sour by the end.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#340 eje

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 01:17 PM

My first guess as far as misspelling would be "Ich dien," which appears on the crest of the Prince of Wales - German for "I serve."  The Prince of Wales cocktail does have brandy and curacao, so maybe this started out as a variant?

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Wow, great deduction! I like that idea hannhah.

I do see "Ich Bein" on some german websites. I'm assuming it's sort of a contraction of "Ich Bin Ein", but can't really tell, my german is so rusty.

In the case of the "Knickerbein", apparently that means something like "Bent Knee".

Interestingly, also the name of one of the early German models of radar, but that wasn't until well after Leo Engel included the Knickerbein in his "American and Other Drinks".

I'm actually a bit disappointed that Craddock didn't include the Knickerbein in the Savoy Cocktail Book. I may have to do a bit of extracurricular drink making, it sounds so interesting and fun.

Edited by eje, 09 June 2008 - 01:17 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#341 slkinsey

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 01:43 PM

Bein = "leg."

Knicken = "to break."

I suppose that makes Knickerbein something like "breaking leg" or "buckling leg" or even "crooked leg." (I assume this is a misspelling of knickebein.)

Edited by slkinsey, 09 June 2008 - 01:58 PM.

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#342 hannnah

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Posted 09 June 2008 - 01:50 PM

I do see "Ich Bein" on some german websites.  I'm assuming it's sort of a contraction of "Ich Bin Ein", but can't really tell, my german is so rusty.

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That looks about right, but doesn't make much sense as far as a name, unless they happened to be making it for a German customer who'd wandered in one day. :laugh:
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#343 eje

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 07:12 AM

Posted Image

Irish Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 tsp. Marteau Verte Classique Absinthe)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Luxardo Triplum)
1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Glass Irish Whisky. (1 oz Redbreast Irish Whiskey)

Shake well (stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Add olive and squeeze orange peel on top.

Well, I was very tempted to double the whiskey in this one, but I restrained myself, and put it in my tiniest glass.

Pretty much an "Improved Irish Whiskey Cocktail". To me, the portion of Absinthe seems a bit large for the small amount of Whiskey in this particular cocktail. Washing the glass with, or a single dash of, Absinthe would probably be plenty. And at that point, you'd have a very tasty cocktail indeed.

Edited by eje, 10 June 2008 - 09:47 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
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#344 eje

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 05:04 PM

Bein = "leg."

Knicken = "to break."

I suppose that makes Knickerbein something like "breaking leg" or "buckling leg" or even "crooked leg."  (I assume this is a misspelling of knickebein.)

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Yes, I am embarrassed to admit the Engel's drink is indeed called the "Knickebein", not the "Knickerbein".

I'm almost as bad as Harry Craddock, with the typos!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#345 bostonapothecary

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Posted 10 June 2008 - 07:58 PM

Bein = "leg."

Knicken = "to break."

I suppose that makes Knickerbein something like "breaking leg" or "buckling leg" or even "crooked leg."  (I assume this is a misspelling of knickebein.)

View Post


Yes, I am embarrassed to admit the Engel's drink is indeed called the "Knickebein", not the "Knickerbein".

I'm almost as bad as Harry Craddock, with the typos!

View Post


engel's drink is really cool... my brother comes to the restaurant and challenges me to make it while i'm really busy... everyone else wonders what the hell is going on...
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#346 eje

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 06:18 AM

Posted Image

Jabberwock Cocktail*

2 Dashes Orange Bitters.
1/3 Dry Gin.
1/3 Dry Sherry.
1/3 Caperitif.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

* This will made you gyre and gamble in the wabe until brillig all right, all right.


Right well, Vorpal Sword at ready, I tried this apparently Lewis Carrol inspired cocktail a couple ways. First using the cocktaildb suggested Caperitif substitution Lillet Blanc:

1 Dash Fee's Orange; 1 Dash Regan's Orange; 1 Dash Angostura; 1 oz Beefeater Gin; 1 oz Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry; 1 oz Lillet Blanc; Stir, Strain, Orange Peel.

Nope, no thank you. Next:

1 Dash Fee's Orange; 1 Dash Regan's Orange; 1 oz Broker's Gin; 1 oz Bodega Dios Baco Fino Sherry; 1 oz sadly ancient, tired, and nearly empty Cocchi Americano; Stir, Strain, Orange Peel.

I don't know if I'd go so far as to say, "O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!" but, much better, anyway. Dammit! Anyone made any progress on a Kina Lillet replica?

I'm thinking some portion of: quinine tincture, cinnamon tincture, orange tincture, brandy, and muscat cannelli for the wine base. It's probably not that simple, but that, at least, is a start.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#347 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 11:26 AM

Dammit!  Anyone made any progress on a Kina Lillet replica?

I'm thinking some portion of: quinine tincture, cinnamon tincture, orange tincture, brandy, and muscat cannelli for the wine base.  It's probably not that simple, but that, at least, is a start.

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To the best of my knowledge, if you're going for maximum authenticity you'd use Armagnac for the fortifier and some presumably inexpensive White Bordeaux for the wine base, though I would imagine not an entirely dry one...maybe a Premieres Cotes du Bordeaux Blanc? I think Muscat Canelli would be too floral, you'd want something relatively neutral I think.
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#348 bostonapothecary

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 12:18 PM

Dammit!  Anyone made any progress on a Kina Lillet replica?

I'm thinking some portion of: quinine tincture, cinnamon tincture, orange tincture, brandy, and muscat cannelli for the wine base.  It's probably not that simple, but that, at least, is a start.

View Post


To the best of my knowledge, if you're going for maximum authenticity you'd use Armagnac for the fortifier and some presumably inexpensive White Bordeaux for the wine base, though I would imagine not an entirely dry one...maybe a Premieres Cotes du Bordeaux Blanc? I think Muscat Canelli would be too floral, you'd want something relatively neutral I think.

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sauternes and armagnac? i saw some haut charmes sauternes on sale. i should probably own a bottle of armagnac... i'll give it a try.
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#349 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 11 June 2008 - 01:09 PM

Dammit!  Anyone made any progress on a Kina Lillet replica?

I'm thinking some portion of: quinine tincture, cinnamon tincture, orange tincture, brandy, and muscat cannelli for the wine base.  It's probably not that simple, but that, at least, is a start.

View Post


To the best of my knowledge, if you're going for maximum authenticity you'd use Armagnac for the fortifier and some presumably inexpensive White Bordeaux for the wine base, though I would imagine not an entirely dry one...maybe a Premieres Cotes du Bordeaux Blanc? I think Muscat Canelli would be too floral, you'd want something relatively neutral I think.

View Post


sauternes and armagnac? i saw some haut charmes sauternes on sale. i should probably own a bottle of armagnac... i'll give it a try.

View Post


I seem to recall reading that there was in fact a Sauternes Lillet (as opposed to 'Kina') made at one point, but it never really took off to the same extent. I don't think you'd want to use a botrytised wine in your Lillet replica, but maybe something naturally off-dry like so much inexpensive Bdx Blanc can be.

Not that it wouldn't be delicious, I just can't see it being appropriate in the same applications.
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#350 eje

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 08:22 PM

[...]
Imperial Cocktail

1 Dash Maraschino. (1/3 tsp. Luxardo Maraschino)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Vermouth)
   
Stir well and serve with olive.

Another cool and tasty Dry Martini variation.  Yum!

Kind of a Dry Vermouth version of the Martinez.  Who can complain about that?

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Uh, that is supposed to say Junipero Gin, not "Vermouth"!

I am as bad as Harry Craddock!
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#351 eje

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Posted 12 June 2008 - 08:36 PM

Posted Image

Campden Cocktail

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Kina Lillet. (1/2 oz Cocchi Americano)

Shake (maybe stir?) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Oddly, going back through these recipes for my blog, it seems I have skipped completely drinking the Campden Cocktail.

To be honest, it is only the bitterness of the Cocchi Americano which saves this from being awful. And even then, to my tastes, it's pretty on the edge.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#352 eje

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 08:38 PM

This is the Seventh in an ongoing series of bartender features in the Savoy Topic.

Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2. While it was more or less successful, it seemed like it would be better to give future bartenders some fair warning, as the recipes and ingredients in the Savoy can be obscure.

To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book.

Surprisingly, some actually were game.

---

Posted Image*

About a year ago Daniel Shoemaker and Ted Charak opened the Teardrop Cocktail Lounge. I visited Portland last fall and had a great time hanging out, geeking out about cocktails, and tasting the numerous bitters and elixirs they were making in house. I mean check out this fantastic Bitters and Tinctures holder they had custom made for the bar:

Posted Image

Anyway, we've kept in touch after meeting at the bar. Turned out Daniel was a good friend of someone I knew in San Francisco. And as time passed I became acquainted with some other folks in the Portland bar and cocktail scene through various acquaintances.

A month ago some friends and Mrs. eje hatched a plan to road trip up to Portland to catch a concert.

As usual, I started to plot ways that I could squeeze drinks at quality cocktail bars into the very short, long weekend in Portland.

I sent Daniel a note asking if he'd be interested in making some Savoy Cocktails while I was in Portland.

He agreed and I sent him the list of the next few cocktail recipes.

While I was thinking about that, it occurred to me that I would have at least three people with me who might be interested in at least trying some cocktails. I usually don't involve civilians in these sorts of affairs, but the "J" cocktails seemed pretty harmless. So I floated the idea of doing all of the "J" cocktails to Daniel. I would bring sheets for my friends to write down their notes and it would be a bit of a party.

He also agreed to that, amazingly.

So I started to do a bit of calling around of Portland friends to see if they would be willing to come out and help, or at least stop by and say, "Hi".

The participants:

eje: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the "Joy of Cooking" originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and guide for the monthly "Tiki Tuesdays" at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. eje, who chose not to write up her thoughts, and Trott's friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

Posted Image

Daniel Shoemaker's BIO

Tended bar in San Francisco for 13 years, running the bar at ThirstyBear
Brewing Co. for almost 10 of those.  Re-located to Portland, OR to open up
Teardrop Cocktail Lounge, as a town that truly appreciates the hands-on,
homemade & farm-to-table approach to food and drink.  In the intervening 1
1/2 years it took us to open our doors, threw myself into the research &
archaeology that led us to create such a wide array of bitters, tonic &
homemade elixirs.


Posted Image

Jack Kearns Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Syrup.
1/4 Bacardi Rum.
3/4 Dry Gin.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Jack Kearns Cocktail (No. 2)

1/4 Bacardi Rum. (1/2 oz Matusalem Platino)
1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Syrup. (House "Gum" Syrup based on maltodextrin)
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Kind of one of those where you stare at them for a while and wonder if you have gone crazy. Nope, they're exactly the same. I did find one recipe for the Jack Kearns, in Patrick Gavin Duffy's "Official Mixer's Manual," which uses more syrup (3 more dashes) for the No. 1 than the No. 2.

From his wikipedia article, "Jack "Doc" Kearns (August 17, 1882 - June 17, 1963) was an American boxing manager from the state of Washington. He is most famous for managing Jack Dempsey, who was World Heavyweight Champion from 1919 to 1926. He also managed Mickey Walker, Joey Maxim, and Archie Moore. He was given the nickname "Doc" from Dempsey."

I guess if you were dealing with a boxing manager who could handle the Manassa Mauler, you'd probably give them what they want. "Feeling a bit sweet today, Jack?"

Humuhumu: "Taste is very fruity, but still dry."
Trott: "Refreshing, awesome, dry, but fruity."
Tradertiki: "Subtle floral notes. Drier rum may crisp it up."

Posted Image

Jack Pine Cocktail

The Juice of 1/4 Orange.
1 Slice Pineapple.
3/4 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

As in the Holland House we have a stray piece of pineapple.

Is it a garnish? Or does it go in the cocktail?

Daniel initially interpreted this as a garnish, so we tried that.

As cocktails go, not that interesting. A dry vermouth version of the Bronx.

However, having recently run across a 1930s era recipe for the "Hugo Special", which calls for you to, "Place slices of orange and pineapple in a mixing glass muddle well," I asked Daniel to give that a try. Daniel's comment was, "that's a completely different cocktail." Others in the group were not that impressed, but I kind of liked it. Might have to revisit the Holland House and try it with muddled pineapple.

Humuhumu: "Pre-muddle version-> Thin. Post-muddle version-> Better, but sort of blah."
Trott: "Best light tiki drink ever."
Tradertiki: "Slightly flat. Better with muddled pineapple."

Posted Image

Jack Rose Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1 Lime.
1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Teardrop Lounge Housemade Raspberry Syrup)
3/4 Applejack or Calvados. (1 1/2 oz Boulard Calvados)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

The bar at Teardrop had just finished off the last of their house grenadine a few months before, so instead we're using raspberry syrup for the Jack Rose. For the first try we went with Lemon, Raspberry, and Calvados. When this wasn't met with unanimous approval, as a proper jack rose should be, we went for a second try with lime, raspberry, and Laird's AppleJack. Met with nearly unanimous aproval, with Mrs. eje proclaiming it to be her favorite cocktail of the evening.

Humuhumu: "Dry, apple comes through strong->too sweet? With AppleJack and lime ->balanced and yum!"
Tradertiki: "Apply and fruity. Could use some understatement. AppleJack and lime creates a subtler, less cloying sweetness."

Posted Image

Jackson Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange)
1/2 Orange Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin, Drops House Orange Tincture)
1/2 Dubonnet. (1 oz Dubonnet Rouge)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

My second try of the Angostura Orange Bitters and I am still liking them a lot. Strong bitter note, intense orange taste, a bit of spice (I was picking up a strong coriander flavor and maybe chamomille).

Cocktail is nothing special to write home about.

Humuhumu: "Tastes like tea. Specifically, some orange tea from Pike Place Market. Not all that good."
Trott: "Way, way, orangey. Hmmm..."
TraderTiki: "Dry Burgundy Orange."

Posted Image

Jack Withers Cocktail

The Juice of 1/2 Orange.
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, as a Bronx is exactly the same with half as much orange juice, there's not much too surprising here. A light and rather vermouthy cocktail. Daniel insisted on re-making it again with Punt e Mes instead of Carpano, which certainly improves things.

No real clues as to who Jack Withers may have been. Another boxer?

Humuhumu: "First version tastes like licking someone's grandmother who has just put on a bunch of perfume."
Trott: "Vermouth-a-rama. Hmmm..."
TraderTiki: "Sweetness on the end, lots of citrus and melon notes. Version 2: More bitterness, punchier flavor."

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Jewel Cocktail
(6 People)

2 Glasses Green Chartreuse. (3/4 oz Green Chartreuse)
2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
2 Glasses Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/2 Dessertspoonful Orange Bitters. (Healthy dashes Angostura Orange)

Shake thoroughly and serve with a cherry, squeezing lemon peel on top.

A medium-dry fast-working cocktail.


A Jewel Cocktail by any other name. One of a few "Savoy Cocktail Book" examples where the "party size" version of the cocktail goes by a different name. Others have noted that "Bijou" is the French word for "Jewel". Daniel also insisted we try a version of the Bijou he'd been making lately with Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey. Oh boy was that tasty!

Humuhumu: "Very full bodied->Strong flavor, sweet. Could stand to be cut with some water, maybe should be served with an ice cube."
Trott: "Muscular, bad-ass, Hell's Angel of Jaeger-like cocktails."
TraderTiki: "A Bijou in disguise, Chartreuse brought out, then centered with the vermouth."

Thus endeth part the first of our adventure at Teardrop Lounge.

Posted Image*

*These pictures by Mrs. eje.
---

Edited by eje, 18 June 2008 - 03:45 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#353 eje

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 09:40 PM

This is the Sixth in an ongoing series of bartender features in the Savoy Topic.

Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2. While it was more or less successful, it seemed like it would be better to give future bartenders some fair warning, as the recipes and ingredients in the Savoy can be obscure.

To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book.

Surprisingly, some actually were game.

---

Posted Image*

Continuing The Savoy "J" Stomp with Daniel Shoemaker at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.

The participants:

Daniel Shoemaker: Bartender Extraordinaire at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.
eje: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the "Joy of Cooking" originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and host of the monthly "Tiki Tuesdays" at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. eje, who chose not to write up her thoughts, and Trott's friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

Posted Image

Jeyplak Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (St. George Absinthe Verte)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)

Shake well (well, stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

This is very similar to one of my favorite Savoy Cocktails (so far), the Fourth Degree. The big difference, being, in the Savoy Cocktail Book, the Fourth Degree is equal parts Gin, Sweet Vermouth, and Dry Vermouth. This is 2/3 Gin, 1/3 Sweet Vermouth. Interestingly, however, some people use this recipe for the Fourth Degree. In his book, "Imbibe!" David Wondrich uses the Fourth Degree recipe from the Waldorf Astoria Bar Book which is exactly this recipe.

I've no idea where the name comes from. All first 8 pages of Jeyplak googles end up at drink databases.

Humuhumu: Tastes way too much like NyQuil.
Trott: Absinthe Martini.
TraderTiki: Unusual, alcohol sweetness, absinthe pastis flavors are calmed.

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Jimmy Blanc Cocktail

3 Dashes Dubonnet. (Dubonet Rouge)
1/3 Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Kina Lillet Approximation)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

We were playing with a bottle of Noilly Prat which Daniel had infused with Orange and Cinnamon and then we were adding pinches of quinine trying to get something like Cocchi Americano. I think we got pretty close to modern Lillet Blanc, but it didn't quite get to where Cocchi Americano lives. It's an interesting challenge. Thinking back on it, it seems like the tinctures must be alcohol based. Orange, spice, quinine, mixed with the wine, and then aged.

Humuhumu: Balanced, but kind of not special. Meh.
Trott: Hmmm... Nah.
TraderTiki: Tastes like perfume.

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Joburg Cocktail

4 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange)
1/2 Glass Caperitif. (1 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Matusalem Platino)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I had to twist Daniel's arm to get him to make this one with Lillet Blanc. He wanted to skip it as we didn't have any solid knowledge about the flavor profile of Caperitif. It's really a pretty decent light cocktail, even with Lillet Blanc. With a bit more full flavored white rum, this would probably be very good.

In regards the name, the Caperitif sort of gives it away. Joburg is the slang name for Johannesburg, as in South Africa.

Humuhumu: I like it! It tastes a bit like the oil-cured herbs de provence olives I get some times.
Trott: I knew a guy in High School named Joe Berg.
TraderTiki: Orange oil, lightly perfumey.

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Jockey Club Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp. Amaretto)
4 Dashes Lemon Juice.
3/4 Glass Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Daniel had called around trying to locate Crème de Noyau for this with no luck. I've tried to convince friends who travel to France to bring back some without any luck. I think I'm going to have to give up and just make it myself. It's stone fruit season. Surely there must be a bunch of stone fruit pits laying around to play with.

Humuhumu: Smells like soap. Tastes very good, though...
Trott: Puzzling.
TraderTiki: Strong Citrus, sharp citrus on front taste.

Posted Image

Johnnie Mack Cocktail

3 Dashes Absinthe. (St. George Absinthe Verte)
1/3 Orange Curacao (3/4 oz Bols Orange Curacao)
2/3 Sloe Gin. (1 1/2 oz Lindisfarne Sloe Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sigh, I've been waiting and waiting for the Plymouth Sloe Gin to show up in San Francisco. The launch party was months ago. And every week I call the liquor store which is hoping to carry it, they say, "soon," or "It will be in next week." And stupidly, every "next week" or "soon" I stop in the store and there is no Plymouth Sloe Gin. Well, at least I have my half bottle of Lindisfarne Sloe Gin which I personally imported in my suitcase.

Anyway, even with the interesting tannic tartness of sloe gin, this is too sweet. "Dessert anyone?" was Daniel's comment. I also don't quite get the combination of Absinthe and Sloe Gin.

Humuhumu: Grape Juicey, too sweet.
Trott: John Adams looks like George Washington, sort of.
TraderTiki: Tart and tangy with great, berry depth.

Posted Image

John Wood Cocktail

2 Parts Irish whisky. (Jameson's Irish Whiskey)
4 Parts Italian Vermouth (Carpano Antica Vermouth)
2 Parts Lemon Juice.
1 Part Kummel. (Gilka Kummel)
1 Dash Angostura bitters.

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I really liked this one. As Daniel put it, "Sometimes when you're making cocktails, you come across one you just want to sit across from and puzzle over." A really interesting Manhattan variation. Apparently, however, not a crowd pleaser!

Humuhumu: Unpleasantly sweet.
Trott: Vermouth waits.. Then Pounces!
TraderTiki: Flavor develops into a sweet bitter orange.

Thus endeth part the second of our adventure at Teardrop Lounge.

Posted Image*

*These pictures by Mrs. eje.

---

Edited by eje, 19 June 2008 - 10:29 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#354 Chris Amirault

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 07:40 AM

Great as always, Erik. Can the participants share a bit more about their substantially different responses to the John Wood?
Chris Amirault
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#355 bostonapothecary

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 08:10 AM

Great as always, Erik. Can the participants share a bit more about their substantially different responses to the John Wood?

View Post



the John Wood does look very cool. its got quite alot of lemon juice so it looks like managable sweetness. is it worth buying a bottle of kummel to try? or would you recommend a common substitute to get the feel of the drinks structure?
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#356 eje

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 09:22 AM

Great as always, Erik. Can the participants share a bit more about their substantially different responses to the John Wood?

View Post

Well, first, I'd say the 2 parts Sweet Vermouth to 1 part Whiskey cocktail is far enough outside of the mainstream of modern American cocktails, that probably no one else in the group had actually drunk one before.

To be honest, I really like Sweet Vermouth. I could happily drink Manhattan, Martini, and Martinez variations all night. Not everyone likes Sweet Vermouth that much, as perhaps you can tell by Humu comparing the Jeyplak Cocktail to "NyQuil". I guess I can kind of see the NyQuil comparison, though my family growing up was always a Robitussin kind of family. Sloe Gin is the medicine which reminds me of childhood cough syrup. Oh, and Apricot Brandy combined with gin and lemon reminds me of childrens' aspirin.

By way of illustration, I'll include this (possibly slightly exaggerated) anecdote, which I was going to put in Part 3 of the write up:

About this time, I hear Humu exclaim something like, "Nooooo! Not more vermouth! I'm vermoooooothed out!" There may have been some sobbing.

And I thought the "J" cocktails were safe.

I guess this is what happens when you involve civilians.

Of course, to be fair, if we were in Humu's milieu and drinking 20 Tiki cocktails in a row, about this time I would be exclaiming, "No! Not more Pineapple Juice! I can't take any more Pineapple Juice!"

It does make me wonder how warped my palate has become from drinking all these vermouth heavy cocktails. If you ask me to taste a cocktail, and I say, "Well, it could use a little more vermouth," now you know why.

Edited by eje, 20 June 2008 - 09:40 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#357 eje

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 09:28 AM

the John Wood does look very cool.  its got quite alot of lemon juice so it looks like managable sweetness.  is it worth buying a bottle of kummel to try? or would you recommend a common substitute to get the feel of the drinks structure?

View Post


I remain fairly convinced that using aquavit as a base for an a la minute liqueur is a perfectly fine substitution for Kummel.

The Gilka Kummel really isn't that great a liqueur. The alcohol base is pretty harsh. I think just about anyone with a passing experience in making liqueurs could probably make something more pleasant.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#358 bostonapothecary

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 11:13 AM

About this time, I hear Humu exclaim something like, "Nooooo!  Not more vermouth!  I'm vermoooooothed out!"  There may have been some sobbing.


i wonder if my palate is warped as well... i've started preferring vermouth to the whiskey and gin... its kind of like smoking cigarettes. at first it seems awful then it grows on you and becomes the dose of familiarity you want in a drink... unfortunately people need to invest in liking it.... i like the chamberyzette replica i've been playing with. as fruity as it is, its undeniably vermouthy. quite the gateway drug...

last night i served what was basically a hennessey (my sponsor), strawberry vermouth sour to 300 people at the "taste of cambridge" and i didn't get a single person say it was ouside the average of their tastes... i got more complements than any other large event i've presented at. score a point for vermouth.

2 oz. hennessey
1 oz. chamberyzette (16% sugar by weight)
1 oz. lime juice
.25 oz. simple syrup
2 dashes peychaud's bitters

the replica recipe is on my blog if anyone is interested. its pretty easy to whip up and is another great way to preserve a good looking harvest. its a cheaper investment than "tequila por mi amante" and maybe almost as satisfying...
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#359 eje

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 09:06 PM

This is the Seventh in an ongoing series of bartender features in the Savoy Topic.

Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2. While it was more or less successful, it seemed like it would be better to give future bartenders some fair warning, as the recipes and ingredients in the Savoy can be obscure.

To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book.

Surprisingly, some actually were game.

---

Posted Image*

Continuing The Savoy "J" Stomp with Daniel Shoemaker at Teardrop Lounge in Portland, OR.

The participants:

eje: Your itinerant Savoy Stomper.
Humuhumu: Tiki goddess and web developer.
Trott: Talented musician, friend and co-worker. It was Trott whose quixotic quest to make all the recipes from the "Joy of Cooking" originally inspired me to take on the Savoy Cocktail Book.
Tradertiki: Portland, OR blogger, Tiki enthusiast, proprietor of his home bar Reynolés Galley, and guide for the monthly "Tiki Tuesdays" at the Teardrop Lounge.

Also along for the ride were Mrs. eje, who chose not to write up her thoughts, and Trott's friend Ken. Siobhan and her husband Ben stopped by a bit later.

Posted Image

J.O.S. Cocktail

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Regan's Orange)
1 Dash Lemon Juice or Lime Juice. (Lemon Juice)
1 Dash Brandy. (Christian Brothers)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well (well, stir, please) and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Daniel stepped out for a moment, leaving us in the capable hands of Alyson for this and the next couple cocktails. This was perfectly fine, I suppose. A more assertive gin than the Plymouth might have saved this from being condemned as flat.

Humuhumu: I'm tired of vermouth. Tastes pretty flat.
Trott: J.O.S.=?? What could J.O.S. stand for? And who is Kaiser Solzheyn?
TraderTiki: A bit flat, flavor down low, watery.

Well, I'm pretty sure that J.O.S. doesn't mean "Java Operating System," but really have no other likely candidates. "Journal of Official Statistics"? There is a city in Nigerial called "Jos", but that's not an acronym.

Posted Image

Journalist Cocktail

2 Dashes Lemon Juice.
2 Dashes Curacao. (Bols Orange Curacao)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/6 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/6 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)
2/3 Gordon's Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

It's always nice to come across a classic you have thus far avoided. I hadn't tried the Journalist before and quite enjoyed it. Interesting to see the response among the group that a slight adjustment of proportions makes, as this is otherwise pretty identical to the J.O.S. Daniel mentioned that this was one of the classic cocktail specials that they'd run through lately, to good response. I can see why.

Humuhumu: Nice and Balanced.
Trott: Excellent ass-end. (Great Finish!)
TraderTiki: Balanced, spice at the finish.

Posted Image

The Judge Jr. Cocktail

1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Bacardi Rum. (3/4 oz Matusalem Platino)
1/3 Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
Powdered Sugar. (1 tsp. Cane Sugar)
1 Dash of Grenadine. (House made Raspberry Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

In his 1927 book, "Here's How," Judge Jr. says about this cocktail, "This drink, I discovered later, was invented by someone else, but it's good just the same!" I'm not sure which drink he's referring to, but it is pretty similar to the Bacardi Special. Kind of funny that a guy would name such a pink drink after himself! I found it refreshing.

Humuhumu: Smells like watermelon, (the real stuff,) tastes too tart, without other flavors coming through->imbalanced.
Trott: I like that a lot, but I'm totally wasted.
TraderTiki: Too tart, grenadine not balancing.

Posted Image

The Judgette Cocktail

1/3 Peach Brandy. (3/4 oz Briottet Creme de Peche de Vigne)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1 Dash of Lime.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I actually found this one fairly pleasant. Definitely dessert-esque, Humu really pegs it as similar to a dessert wine. It is a cocktail I could see enjoying after dinner. Maybe with a dash of bitters?

Humuhumu: Too sweet, tastes like dessert wine.
Trott: Sweet. Dry peach brandy would be... Oh gosh, I've had a lot to drink.
TraderTiki: Muscat like sweetness. Very sweet, but not cloying.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Jupiter Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Orange Juice
1 Teaspoonful Parfait Amour Liqueur. (Brizard Parfait Amour)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (1 oz Plymouth Gin)

Stir well in ice and strain. Twist of Lemon Peel.

I've been putting off the Jupiter for some time now, as folks usually descripe it as difficult to make. But Daniel really pulls it off. Just the hint of the Parfait Amour flavor is very subtle and enjoyable. The sort of cocktail I really enjoy. Where even after all these cocktails, there is something curious in the flavors that makes you want to take another sip and figure out.

Humuhumu: Simple--I think I have vermouth burnout, though.
Trott: See above.
TraderTiki: Calm orange flavor.

Posted Image*

Obviously, it would have been wise to stop at about this point, but, well, few people have ever accused me of being a wise man. We also tried a couple Teardrop cocktails and some things that Daniel was working on. Then we settled up our bill and wandered off in search of dinner and, hopefully, to sober up a bit before the concert we were attending later in the evening.

First, let me say how great it was that Daniel and the other bartenders at the Teardrop were willing to play along with this little game. I've sort of wanted to do something like this myself, in celebration of 2 years of Savoy Stomping, but how much more fantastic to have Portland Monthly's 2008 Bartenders of the Year mix the drinks instead? Not to mention wash the dishes!

To be honest, when I was going over the drinks in preparation for the trip, and then looking at Teardrop's menu online, I was thinking to myself, "What the hell am I thinking? Why are we just not going to Teardrop to enjoy their drinks?" But then, who knows, maybe no one would have tried the John Wood cocktail for another 30 years. I certainly expect this may have been the first time anyone has made it in the last 30 years!

Speaking from my side of the bar, I know everyone had a great time and came away with a real respect with what they are accomplishing there at the Teardrop Cocktail Lounge. Just about everyone in the group was already making plans to return the next time they were in Portland.

I count myself lucky to have met these talented men and women and truly look forward to tasting what interesting things they are up to the next time I see them. I promise, there will be no Savoy Cocktails involved!
---
*These pictures by Mrs. eje.

Edited by eje, 23 June 2008 - 09:28 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#360 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 23 June 2008 - 10:15 PM

Re the Judgette: what kind of circumstancial evidence might there be to support the intended use of dry, barrel-aged peach brandy here? With just a dash of lime it seems plausible, although the feminine diminutive would suggest that the drink should be somewhat sweet. Thoughts?
Andy Arrington

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