Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2007–2008)


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
550 replies to this topic

#61 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 20 December 2007 - 10:39 AM

Posted Image

Eye-Opener Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Fresh Egg.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar. (scant teaspoon Caster Sugar)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Verte de Fougerolles)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 tsp Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp Amaretto di Saschira)
1 Liqueur Glass Rum. (1 1/2 oz Inner Circle Green Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sadly, my schemes to acquire Noyau de Poissy or Noyau de Vernon have so far come to naught, so I have substituted Luxardo's Amaretto.

Unlikely though it seems, this is a very nice cocktail, and will certainly open your eyes, should they previously have been closed.

Both this and the preceding "Everything But" would make tremendous brunch cocktails. If we find enough of these, maybe we can finally put those old saws, the mimosa and screwdriver, back to bed where they belong.

edit - If you're like me, you'll make this cocktail, taste it, and think of that open bottle of champagne in your fridge. Go for it. It's pretty tasty that way too.

Edited by eje, 20 December 2007 - 04:42 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#62 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 21 December 2007 - 12:51 PM

Well, "E" went even faster than "D"!

I guess it helps that it only has about 16 cocktails. Well, that and the fact that the bartender I interviewed insisted on making almost a dozen of them.

In any case, to start the letter "E" off auspiciously, I met up with Martin Cate at Forbidden Island in Alameda, CA. Of the 11 cocktails he made, I'd say a good 3 were above average and 6 or so pretty good. The 3 above average should include the Eddie Brown, East and West, and E. Nos. We also got to try the new, and definitely above average, St. George Absinthe.

Of the 4 remaining cocktails, the "Everybody's Irish" Cocktail, "Everything But" Cocktail, and Eye-Opener Cocktail were all very tasty.

That's going to be it for me and Savoy Cocktails for the year. I'm going to take the next couple weeks off.

I hope you have a happy holiday, whatever it might be you celebrate, and ring in the new year with good cheer!

I look forward to seeing you next year!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#63 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 03 January 2008 - 08:59 PM

Duppy Cocktail

Pour 4 1/2 glasses of Whisky (2 oz Asyla Scotch) into a large glass and soak in this a few cloves (for an hour or two - eje). Add 5 or 6 drops of Orange Bitters (Healthy Dash Regan's, Healthy Dash Fee's), and lastly put in 1 1/2 glasses of Curacao (3/4 oz Brizard Curacao).  Place the lot in the shaker; shake (stir, strain - eje) and serve.
[...]

View Post

So here's an odd thing!

Over the holiday I found a 1934 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy's "Official Mixer's Manual". In this book he gives the "Duppy Cocktail (6 People)" as:

Soak in 4 1/2 Glasses Whiskey; Few Leaves of Clover; 5 or 6 Dashes Orange Bitters; 1 1/4 Glasses Curacao; Shake well in ice, strain and serve.


Given that Mr. Duffy is often far more accurate with recipe transcription than Mr. Craddock, this does give me a bit of pause. From what I remember I didn't think clover leaves have a great deal of flavor. The flowers, though, appear to sometimes be used to Flavor Syrups and other such things. Puzzling. Well, it appears to be fairly commonly available as an herbal remedy, so I may have to give the Duppy another try!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#64 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 January 2008 - 07:36 PM

Posted Image

Fair and Warmer Cocktail

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini and Rossi Rosso Vermouth)
2/3 Bacardi Rum. (1 1/2 oz Havana Club 7)
2 Dashes Curacao. (1/2 teaspoon Luxardo Triplum)

Shake (stir) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I was going to use the regular Flor de Cana dry, but it seemed like all I would taste would be the vermouth. Glad to have an excuse to use the Havana Club, instead.

I've been using the M&R sweet vermouth for a couple months now, and I gotta say, it's kind of won me over. The Cinzano just tastes really cloying now, with vanilla notes that distract me from the flavor of the drink.

The Luxardo Triplum isn't a Curacao, strictly speaking, whatever that means, but it does pack the strongest bitter orange punch of the various orange liqueurs I currently have in the house.

Seemed like a drink that called out for a cherry, but these Silver Palate Maraschino Cherries (no artificial color) just suck. Might as well eat sugar coated red cardboard. I'm going to have to track down some more of those tasty Toschi Amarena Cherries. They rocked.

New supposed crystal glassware from ebay. A little top heavy and I find the stems a bit short, but I'm pleased to find them the perfect size for the neat drinks in the Savoy.

What's not to love about a "Cuban Manhattan"?
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#65 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,626 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 11 January 2008 - 08:49 PM

Seemed like a drink that called out for a cherry, but these Silver Palate Maraschino Cherries (no artificial color) just suck. 


Boy, I second that. Yikes.
Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#66 mkayahara

mkayahara
  • participating member
  • 1,839 posts
  • Location:Guelph, Ontario

Posted 11 January 2008 - 08:54 PM

To backtrack a bit to the Elk cocktail above, I cracked open my bottle of Vedrenne Prunelle this evening and pitted it against my homemade Damson gin. I'm sad to report that they taste nothing alike. At first, I couldn't understand it, because the Prunelle tasted closer to apricot brandy than anything else I could think of, with maybe some cherry in the mix as well...

So I made myself an Elk, which is an perfectly lovely drink. Then, as I was putting the bottle away, I re-read the label on the back. Lo and behold! It clearly indicates that the liqueur is made from "noyaux de prunelle," or plum kernels. (Incidentally, at least two of my French resources translate "prunelle" directly as "sloe". Don't know how accurate that is botanically.)

Anyway, I'm guessing that the closest approximation, absent genuine Prunelle, would be apricot brandy. Though surely there's already another cocktail in the same proportions as the Elk that calls for apricot brandy?
Matthew Kayahara
Kayahara.ca
@mtkayahara

#67 thirtyoneknots

thirtyoneknots
  • participating member
  • 1,968 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 January 2008 - 12:44 AM

I was going to use the regular Flor de Cana dry, but it seemed like all I would taste would be the vermouth.  Glad to have an excuse to use the Havana Club, instead.

View Post


More power to you for having Havana Club, but maybe try the less filtered offerings from Flor de Cana for the rest of us. I havent tried the 7 or 12 years but the rest of them from 4-18 years are excellent. I could see the 4 yr gold or 5 yr dark working here, depending on what you're looking for in the drink. I'm under the impression that Bacardi at the time made only what would be called white (Carta Blanco) and gold (Carta de Oro) rums. I'm not an expert on the subject but I've never seen any reference to prewar dark Bacardi rums.

Glad to see all this back underway!

-Andy
Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

#68 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 12 January 2008 - 12:29 PM

To backtrack a bit to the Elk cocktail above, I cracked open my bottle of Vedrenne Prunelle this evening and pitted it against my homemade Damson gin. I'm sad to report that they taste nothing alike. At first, I couldn't understand it, because the Prunelle tasted closer to apricot brandy than anything else I could think of, with maybe some cherry in the mix as well...

So I made myself an Elk, which is an perfectly lovely drink. Then, as I was putting the bottle away, I re-read the label on the back. Lo and behold! It clearly indicates that the liqueur is made from "noyaux de prunelle," or plum kernels. (Incidentally, at least two of my French resources translate "prunelle" directly as "sloe". Don't know how accurate that is botanically.)
[...]

View Post

Now that is just confusing!

Prunelle is made from just the kernels of the sloes, not the whole fruit? I guess that would explain why it is lighter in color than sloe gin! Cocktaildb Image.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#69 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 January 2008 - 10:16 AM

Posted Image

Fairbanks Cocktail (No. 2)

2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (1/2 tsp. Luxardo Amaretto)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Dash Fee's, Dash Regan's Orange)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater's Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note - We often wondered what Doug did it on now that we know we are going to try to do it ourselves.


In his 1922 book, "Cocktails: How to Mix Them," Robert Vermeire calls this the “Fairbank Cocktail” and uses equal parts ("¼ Gill") of French Vermouth and Gin. I'll assume that the Savoy author is referring to Douglas Fairbanks. Since evidence indicates Fairbanks was rather well known as a teetotaler*, I will note that Vermeire also gives the following information, "This drink is called after Senator Fairbank, a personal friend of the late President Roosevelt, of America." That would be Teddy, not Franklin, as this was written in 1922.

I have still failed to come across a decent Noyau, and refuse to buy the Hiram Walker, so substitute Amaretto here. Unfortunately, the Luxardo Amaretto is a nominally worse than average substitution, as they use actual almonds to flavor it, instead of the usual Apricot pits. C'est la vie.

As made, it is a subtle and tasty update of the standard Martini formula. Quite nice, with the hint of almond and bare touch of sweetness.

*From an article at the Douglas Fairbanks Museum, "...all the more surprising since Fairbanks himself was a lifelong teetotaler who didn’t even drink alcohol." From another article about Mary Pickford, "Douglas, an athletic, colossal star...A fanatical, snobbish teetotaler...disapproved of Mary's drinking..."
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#70 mkayahara

mkayahara
  • participating member
  • 1,839 posts
  • Location:Guelph, Ontario

Posted 15 January 2008 - 09:14 AM

Prunelle is made from just the kernels of the sloes, not the whole fruit?  I guess that would explain why it is lighter in color than sloe gin!  Cocktaildb Image.

View Post


Well, my bottle looks different from the one in the CocktailDB image, but the contents look to be about the same shade of yellow. As for what goes into it, the label on the back of the bottle says "...distilled from selected aged spirits and wild sloe kernels." I'm not sure what goes into the "aged spirits" in question, but it does seem that it's only the sloe kernels, and not the fruit, that are involved.
Matthew Kayahara
Kayahara.ca
@mtkayahara

#71 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 15 January 2008 - 09:58 AM

Posted Image

Fallen Angel Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
2 Dashes Crème de Menthe. (1/2 bar spoon Brizard Crème de Menthe)
The Juice of 1 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1 lemon)
1 Glass Dry Gin. (2 oz Aviation Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: It has never been made quite clear as to whether this is intended to be taken by the Angel before or after falling; as an encouragement or as a consolation.


Another of my favorite Savoy quotes.

The recipe is sort of odd. I mean the usual ingredient note for cocktails with choice of lemon or lime is, "Juice of 1 lime or 1/2 lemon," so the fact that this recommends 1/2 lime or a whole lemon is a bit odd. Unfortunately, it's not a cocktail whose origins have yet been tracked down, so there's no real way for me to know if it is a typo or not. I chose lemon, and went a little easy on it.

I have to admit I expected to dislike this cocktail. I really didn't think it could possibly be palatable with that much lemon juice against that little sweetener. But, somehow it is. I dunno, I would call it refreshing.

edit - Picked the Aviation gin, as it seemed like its use of lavender in the herb bill might be interesting in the cocktail with the mint. I think it worked well.

Edited by eje, 15 January 2008 - 02:18 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#72 thirtyoneknots

thirtyoneknots
  • participating member
  • 1,968 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 15 January 2008 - 10:13 AM

I actually tried the Fallen Angel last week and thought it was going to be really interesting, being, basically, a minty aviation. It wasn't as good as I thought it would be, but I think there's a truly fascinating drink hiding in that combination, if it were to be made dry like I like may aviations (ie with very little liqueur). As it stands the DeKuyper CdM I was using was very sweet, even in small quantities. This may sound like a cliche, but my friend I was drinking this with suggested replacing half of the Menthe with Cacao. I think it actually holds some promise, sort of like a 20th Century, but with mint up front to compliment the cacao in the finish.

And yeah thats a great quote.

-Andy
Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

#73 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:32 PM

Posted Image

Fancy Cocktail
(6 People)
Pour into the shaker 5 glasses of Cognac and a dessertspoonful of Angostura Bitters. Shake thoroughly and serve, adding a little champagne and a piece of lemon-rind after having rubbed the edges of the glasses with lemon syrup.

Fancy Cocktail disambiguation via David Wondrich's "Imbibe!"

You'll probably have noted that I have interpreted the "Fancy Cocktail" thus from this week's MxMo post:

Fancy Cocktail for one

Rub the rim of a cocktail glass with a slice of lemon. Frost the edge with superfine or caster sugar. Pour into the shaker 2 oz Cognac and a generous dash of Angostura Bitters. Stir with cracked ice until well chilled, and strain into the frosted glass. Top up with a bit of champagne, squeeze a piece of lemon peel over the glass and drop it in.

In Mr. Wondrich's book, he divides the types of "cocktail" into the following categories, "Original", "Plain", "Fancy", "Improved", and "Old-Fashioned".

"Original Cocktail", is ye olde bittered sling, specification of spirits, bitters, sugar, and water. Nutmeg optional.

"Plain Cocktail" is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, and curacao served on the rocks with a twist of lemon.

"Fancy Cocktail" is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, and curacao, stirred with ice, and strained into another glass and garnished with a twist of lemon.

"Improved Cocktail" is Gum syrup, bitters, spirits, maraschino liqueur, absinthe, stirred with ice, strained into another glass and garnished with a twist of lemon.

And "Old-fashioned Cocktail" is the "original" served with rocks instead of water and a lemon twist instead of nutmeg.

Anyway, he notes the "Fancy" category sometimes included a frosted rim, a la Crusta, or a top up of champanski. Hey, who would argue? Though, I wonder what sort of individual would say, "Excuse me barkeep, I will have a fancy brandy cocktail, thank you!"

As the "Savoy Cocktail Book" seems to have the most bad luck transcribing these pre-prohibition of cocktails, (see the Savoy "Coffee Cocktail" and "Brandy Crusta" for other poorly transcribed examples,) their "Fancy Cocktail" recipe makes almost no sense. I mean, how can you "rub the edges of a glass with lemon syrup"? Just sounds really messy to me. They have also decided to solidify on Cognac and leave out the Curacao. No tremendous loss there.

I've sort of gone with the Chicago method for the "Fancy Cocktail" and left it at that.

I like the "Chicago Cocktail" and I like the "Fancy Cocktail." Guess that makes me some sort of flannel wearing dandy. Woo!

edit - details

Edited by eje, 17 January 2008 - 11:16 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#74 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:42 PM

I actually tried the Fallen Angel last week and thought it was going to be really interesting, being, basically, a minty aviation. It wasn't as good as I thought it would be, but I think there's a truly fascinating drink hiding in that combination, if it were to be made dry like I like may aviations (ie with very little liqueur). As it stands the DeKuyper CdM I was using was very sweet, even in small quantities. This may sound like a cliche, but my friend I was drinking this with suggested replacing half of the Menthe with Cacao. I think it actually holds some promise, sort of like a 20th Century, but with mint up front to compliment the cacao in the finish.

And yeah thats a great quote.

-Andy

View Post

Funny! Peppermint Patty with citrus and gin isn't tripping my trigger, but maybe it would be OK in execution. Let us know!

In my Fallen Angel, I did keep the mint down to a half a teaspoon which was pretty minimal. I dunno how the sweetness of the DeKuyper compares to the Brizard, but the balance of sweet and sour was right at the edge for me. You're right, it was very similar to a minty Aviation.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#75 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 18 January 2008 - 10:21 AM

Posted Image

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe.
1/6 Maraschino.
1/3 Brandy.
1/3 Dry Gin.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.


Posted Image

Fantasio Cocktail. (No. 2.)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Brandy)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I've stared and stared at these two Fantasios and can find no difference between them, aside from the shaking detail. In the 1934 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy's "Official Mixer's Manual" they are actually both stirred, but the No. 2 gets a cherry. God knows why there are two versions of this cocktail in either book.

Gin and Brandy isn't one of those things that really pops into my head as a great combination, so I thought about this one for a while, comparing the gins I had in the house. Eventually, I decided to go with a Jonge Genever. It seemed like the slight maltiness would complement the brandy well.

I also nominally cheated on the recipe ratio. Just couldn't quite face that much liqueur.

Fantasio, slight variation

1/4 oz Brizard White Crème de Menthe
1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino
3/4 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac
1 oz Boomsma Jonge Genever

Stir, strain, cherry.

Maybe I'm on crack, but this isn't half bad. Sort of a more complex Stinger. The cherry is a nice touch and I like the flavors it brings towards the end of the cocktail after soaking in the booze.

The astute among you will notice the first appearance of a new Brandy. Going through the various Armagnacs available locally, I discovered that this one is produced by Ferrand, whose Cognac I quite enjoyed. I'll have to post more detailed notes over in the Brandy topic, but I am enjoying the flavor. Quite different from the various Brandies I've tried. It seems to have more complex flavor. Kind of tobacco/cigar-ish. Definitely intriguing.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#76 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 20 January 2008 - 01:55 PM

Posted Image

Fernet Branca Cocktail

1/4 Fernet Branca. (Generous 1/2 oz Fernet)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (Generous 1/2 oz Martini & Rossi)
1/2 Dry Gin. (Generous 1 oz Death's Door Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: One of the best "morning-after" cocktails ever invented.  Fernet-Branca, an Italian vegetable extract, is a marvelous headache cure. (No advt.)


The next time I have such a bad hangover that I feel like I'm standing on Death's Door, I'll have to give this a try. Unfortunately, tonight, I didn't start with a head or stomach ache, so can't vouch for any particular therapeutic effect. I guess I hope the Fernet Branca Cocktaill is good for me in some manner, as it isn't all that attractive looking or pleasant to drink. Pretty much just tastes like Fernet.

When checking for versions of this cocktail, I did see that other authors frequently call for Brandy instead of Gin. Might be an improvement?
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#77 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 22 January 2008 - 01:08 PM

Posted Image

Fifth Avenue Cocktail

1/3 Crème de Cacao. (Mozart Black Chocolate Liqueur)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/3 Sweet Cream.

Use liqueur glass and pour carefully, so that ingredients do not mix.

This was actually pretty yummy, as these sorts of things go. But, then, I enjoy drinking the R&W Orchard Apricot straight. So, no problem there. Heck, I'd probably have it with my toast in the morning, or on my pancakes, if I didn't have a pesky job to go to.

I got the Mozart Black Chocolate liqueur a while ago and have failed in my imagination to find uses for it. This was really pretty good. Certainly beats the heck out of Bols Creme de Cacao. I'm just glad that the specific gravities worked out between the two liqueurs.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#78 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 22 January 2008 - 08:49 PM

This is the Fifth in an ongoing series of bartender features in the Savoy Topic.

Previously, I had experimented by asking the bartender at Montgomery Place to make me a Bombay Cocktail No. 2, but this just seemed to result in a grumpy bartender.

To make it less of a shock, I thought I would contact some local bartenders and give them a choice of the dozen or so Savoy Cocktails that might be coming up in the book.

Surprisingly, some actually were game.

---

When I met up with Erik Adkins at Flora in Oakland, he mentioned that one of his bartenders at the Slanted Door might be interested in participating in the Savoy topic.

Posted Image

I've talked up the Slanted Door in various topic here on eGullet. I think they do a fantastic job with their bar program. They have a great menu and take an amazing amount of care, using all fresh juices and making many ingredients in house, including Jennifer Colliau's fantastic orgeat. Even though we hadn't met before, I was really psyched when I found out Jennifer was the bartender at the Slanted Door interested in participating.

Posted Image

What a joy to take pictures in a relatively well lit bar for a change!

Posted Image

Jennifer Colliau

Jennifer has worked in the restaurant industry her whole life, and began bartending as soon as she was legally allowed to do so.  She became bar manager of the Sonora Cafe, an upscale southwestern restaurant in Los Angeles, at age 23, where she soon found herself indoctrinated into the mysterious and intriguing world of the Agave.  When she is not tending bar, she designs and makes furniture and teaches woodworking in Oakland.


Posted Image

Two Absinthes behind the bar! How great is that? A mere month or so ago, there would have been nothing.

Posted Image

Fascinator Cocktail

2 Dashes Absinthe. (20 drops)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray No. 10)
1 Sprig Fresh Mint.

Shake (stir) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Preferred the Kubler in this cocktail. Somehow it seemed less muddled and the other ingredients of the drink were more able to shine. Since we were stirring this and not shaking, we were both quite surprised how clearly the flavor of the mint came through in the Kubler version.

The first thing that came up here is the question of the "dash". Jennifer initially insisted on the small size, measuring dashes in drops, while I maintained my 2 dashes is half barspoon opinion (inarticulately and poorly.) I did mention my theory that not all "dashes" are necessarily equivalent. I.e. a dash from a bitters bottle not necessarily the same as a dash of lemon juice or curacao. This idea had some traction, especially as we progressed through the following recipes.

Posted Image

Favourite Cocktail

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (10 drops)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz House Made Apricot Liqueur)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth)

Shake (stir) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This was nice, but is a hard one to balance. That single "dash" of Lemon Juice is really tough. A little too much will tip this cocktails towards flavors I would describe as "children's aspirin". Not enough and it is too sweet. As well, very dependent on the brand of apricot liqueur.

Q: What place do house made ingredients have in the commercial bar?

A: Ideally, a bar wouldn't have to make any ingredients in house.  Unfortunately, the quality isn't always there in commercial products, so if a bar wants to serve a drink of a certain level of quality, they often have no choice but to make some of the ingredients themselves.  The other aspect is, when I see house made ingredients on a bar menu I know that the bar is taking a certain amount of care.  That the staff are involved enough to take an interest in serving quality drinks.


Posted Image

Fairbanks Cocktail (No. 1)

1 Dash Lemon Juice. (1/2 tsp)
1 Dash Grenadine. (1/2 tsp House Made)
1/3 Apricot Brandy. (3/4 oz House Made Apricot Liqueur)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass, with a cherry.

This was the favorite of the evening, a very nice cocktail. The grenadine makes this a bit easier to balance than the Favourite cocktail above. I think we went with an half teaspoon of each, perhaps a bit generous.

Two house made ingredients here, a wonderful Grenadine that Jennifer wakes up a bit by mixing 2-1 with fresh pomegranate juice, and an Apricot Liqueur that Erik Adkins makes by macerating whole apricots in Osocalis Brandy. Just sort of FYI, as Erik A. pointed out, while freezing the apricots probably does help to break the internal cell structure of the apricots, apricot skin is too tough for the skin cracking jackal10 details in his Autumn and Festive Preserves to work. Yer gonna want to poke those apricots with a fork before soaking them in booze. Erik Adkins' is a very nice apricot liqueur, with the taste of the apricot kernels a subtle addition, rather than the over the top cherry flavor of the Brizard Apry.

Posted Image

Q: As we're located near wine country here in Northern California, do you ever try to sway wine or beer drinkers to try cocktails?

A: I don't usually try to steer people away from their beverage choices.  I view my job as providing people with a satisfying experience.  We have a lot of options for beer and wine at the restaurant and each has its place in the meal.  If someone orders a cosmo or vodka tonic, I might try to steer them towards something more interesting on the drink menu.  One of my favorite drinks, and a great drink to convert cocktail drinkers who don't think they like gin, is a Gin Gimlet topped with 3 drops of Absinthe.  We have so many special things we make in house, and great choices on the cocktail menu, that I will try to convince willing drinkers to have those instead of something more predictable.


Posted Image

Fairy Belle Cocktail

The White of 1 Egg.
1 Teaspoonful of Grenadine. (House made)
1/4 Apricot Brandy. (generous 1/2 oz House made Apricot Liqueur)
3/4 Dry Gin. (generous 1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into port wine glass.

This was all right and an appealing looking cocktail to look at, but found I liked it less than I was expecting to. I have to admit that revisiting this recipe, I'm considering trying it with Apricot Eau-de-Vie, instead of the liqueur.

Posted Image

‘Flu Cocktail

Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Dash Jamaica Ginger. (5 drops Ginger Extract)
1 Teaspoonful Rock Candy Syrup. (Cane Syrup)
1 Teaspoonful Ginger Brandy. (Reisetbauer Ginger Eau-de-Vie)
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Canadian Mist 1885 Whisky)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass, but do not ice.

This is oddly enjoyable. It is a bit medicinal or theraputic in flavor. Still, quite nice. Probably be nicer with a good old fashioned American Rye Whiskey! And wow, is that Reisetbauer Ginger Eau-de-Vie something. Amazing!

Jennifer Colliau's Original Cocktail:

Reunion Cooler

1/2 oz (by volume) pink peppercorns
4 1-inch pieces ripe pineapple
1-inch by 8-inch strip grapefruit peel (no pith)
1/2 oz lime juice
1 barspoon agave syrup
1 3/4 oz silver tequila (preferably El Tesoro or Don Julio)

Crush peppercorns in the bottom of a mixing glass with a muddler. Add pineapple and grapefruit peel and muddle thoroughly. Add lime juice, agave and tequila, fill with ice and shake thoroughly. Strain through a julep strainer into a double old-fashioned glass filled with fresh ice, but do not double strain. There should be flecks of pink from the peppercorns in the drink. Garnish with a horse's neck of grapefruit peel.

Slanted Door is a pretty high volume establishment, and there's no question that they serve a lot of Vodka Cranberries and Vodka Tonics. But, if you scratch a little beneath the surface, you'll find some of the best cocktails, highest quality ingredients, and most personable and knowledgeable bartenders in the Bay Area.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#79 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 25 January 2008 - 12:56 PM

Posted Image

Fifty-Fifty Cocktail

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Dolin French Vermouth)
(A dash of Regan's and a dash of Fee's Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with Olive.)

Yep, that's tasty all right.

Sometimes there are few things better than a nice cold Tanqueray or Junipero Martini. Still really enjoying the Dolin in these vermouth heavy Martini-like cocktails.

The serendipity of going from the Fernet Cocktail to the Fifth Avenue to the Fifty-Fifty is pretty amusing. Nice to have a bit of variety in your cocktails.

What's the story with the "Fitty-Fitty"? Was it the addition of Orange bitters that made them decide to give it an updated name? It is much better with the bitters...
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#80 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 26 January 2008 - 01:33 PM

Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe.
1/6 Maraschino.
1/3 Brandy.
1/3 Dry Gin.

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Fantasio Cocktail. (No. 2.)

1/6 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Creme de Menthe)
1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Maraschino)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Brandy)
1/3 Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I've stared and stared at these two Fantasios and can find no difference between them, aside from the shaking detail.  In the 1934 edition of Patrick Gavin Duffy's "Official Mixer's Manual" they are actually both stirred, but the No. 2 gets a cherry.  God knows why there are two versions of this cocktail in either book.
[...]

View Post


Well, this is rather embarrassing.

While the Fantasios in the Savoy Cocktail Book are exactly the same, excepting the stirring/shaking detail, I was looking through 1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy for the umpteenth time, and noticed the Fantasios are different:

Fantasio Cocktail No. 1
1/6 White Creme de Menthe
1/6 Maraschino
1/3 Brandy
1/3 French Vermouth
Stir well and strain.
Use glass Number 1.


Fantasio Cocktail No. 2
1/6 White Creme de Menthe
1/6 Maraschino
1/3 Brandy
1/3 Italian Vermouth
Stir well in ice and strain. Add a cherry.
Use glass number 1.


Uh, oops! I've no explanation for completely missing the fact that he calls for vermouth instead of Gin. I guess sometimes you see what you want to see!?

"Glass number 1" looks like this, and is used for many "up" cocktails in Duffy:

Posted Image

edit - So that makes it more of a Brandy Manhattan variation, than a, well, whatever the hell the Savoy Brandy and Gin concoction is. Damn, another cocktail I'm going to have to remake. I still think the Genever and Brandy was a fine combination...

Edited by eje, 26 January 2008 - 02:01 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#81 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 26 January 2008 - 11:34 PM

So, the Savoy Cocktail Book Duppy Cocktail was as follows...

Duppy Cocktail

Pour 4 1/2 glasses of Whisky into a large glass and soak in this a few cloves. Add 5 or 6 drops of Orange Bitters, and lastly put in 1 1/2 glasses of Curacao. Place the lot in the shaker; shake and serve.

But, it turns out, Patrick Gavin Duffy, who tends to be a bit more particular about recipes, writes it down as follows.

Duppy Cocktail
(6 People)

Soak in
4 1/2 Glasses Whiskey
Few Leaves of Clover
5 or 6 Dashes of Orange Bitters
1 1/4 Glasses Curacao

Shake well in ice, strain and serve.
Use glass number 1


Uh, wow, "clover" to "cloves" is kind of a big deal.

Red Clover: Herbal Remedies

Red clover also contains the blood-thinning substance coumarin. Coumarin is not unique to red clover; it is found in many other plants, including common grass. In fact, the pleasant sweet smell of freshly cut grass is due to the coumarin compounds. People on anticoagulant drugs such as Coumadin should be cautious of using red clover, as the blood may become too thin.


But, maybe not as crazy sounding as it seems. I mean, Buffalo Grass Vodka has some of these same substances.

So, I soaked a few red clover flowers and a couple leaves...

Posted Image

...in a half cup of wild turkey rye for 12 hours.

2 oz Clover infused Rye
1 oz Luxardo Triplum
generous dash fee's orange bitters
generous dash regan's orange bitters

Stir with cracked ice, strain into cocktail glass.

Posted Image

Unfortunately, that was the last of my Wild Turkey Rye, so no side by side comparison of clover vs. non-clover drinks was possible. But, it definitely changed the character of the Rye. More sweet herbal and vanilla-ish notes, I think.

All in all, I think I liked the Scotch/Clove Duppy a bit more. But, I dunno, there was something compelling about the flavors of the clover infused rye...

??
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#82 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 12:56 PM

Posted Image

Filmograph Cocktail

1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Cerbois VSOP Armagnac)
1/4 Kola Tonic. (1/2 oz Rose's Kola Tonic)
1/4 Sirop-de-citron. (1/2 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

Shake, (well, stir, I suppose,) and strain into cocktail glass.

Posted Image

I know I promised to make my own Sirop-de-Citron the next time one of the cocktails called for it. And it is even lemon season. Sadly I have failed. And sadly failed this drink. At least with the Monin Lemon Syrup, this is the equivalent of some sort of very sweet hard candy with the Kola Tonic giving it a lovely medicinal edge. Cough Drop in liquid form. It's hard for me to see this as anything other than a waste of a delicious Brandy.

...

Earlier in the day, a friend had called. Asking if I happened to have any Armagnac. It isn't odd for him to ask me for a couple ounces of drink ingredients, as I know he is currently making drinks as part of his personal obsessive-compulsive project to make all the recipes from the "Joy of Cooking". But, I did think it a bit odd to ask about Armagnac. I mean, there really aren't that many cocktails that specify Armagnac. Why would they include one with the dozen or so cocktails in the Joy of Cooking? Turns out it is a Sidecar variation which they are inexplicably calling an "Armored Car," (every google I do for "Armored Car" and "cocktail" turns up tequila and amaretto.)

My friend came over, and I made him an Armagnac Sidecar (2-1-1) with the Cerbois, Cointreau, and fresh lemon juice. Damn, if it wasn't the best Sidecar I've ever made. I've actually always thought it a bit of a waste to use a too nice Brandy in Sidecars, as it often gets plowed over by the Cointreau and Lemon. The Armagnac really puts up a fight!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#83 TVC

TVC
  • participating member
  • 69 posts

Posted 28 January 2008 - 01:09 PM

I find that the Cerbois is great in a Sazerac. If you try it, try it with this variation...Scraping a vanilla bean onto a teaspoon of demara sugar, dousing the mixture (on the spoon) with absinthe and igniting it until the sugar melts. Kinda like cooking smack (I imagine). Dump the melted sugar/vanilla bean into your mixing glass with ice, armagnac, Peychauds. Stir and strain as usual. Edge glass with vanilla bean pod and lemon twist. It's a fun presentation mostly but the vanilla really works with the armagnac. Just use a spoon you don't mind charring.
"Wives and such are constantly filling up any refrigerator they have a
claim on, even its ice compartment, with irrelevant rubbish like
food."" - Kingsley Amis

#84 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,107 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 28 January 2008 - 01:16 PM

. . . sadly failed this drink.  At least with the Monin Lemon Syrup, this is the equivalent of some sort of very sweet hard candy with the Kola Tonic giving it a lovely medicinal edge.  Cough Drop in liquid form.  It's hard for me to see this as anything other than a waste of a delicious Brandy.

The Filmograph is one of the drinks featured in Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails. I believe Doc says something like "substitute lemon juice for the lemon syrup unless you enjoy drinking maple syrup straight from the bottle." In cases like this, it's never quite clear what was meant by "lemon syrup." It could mean a lemon-infused simple syrup, or simply fresh lemon juice with some sweetener added. Interestingly, cocotailDB has it with sirop de citron and cola (rather than kola tonic). And also interestingly, back in 2002 Doc said that "as I reckon, Kola Tonic (a brand name being Toni-Cola, made by the Secrestat Bitters folks) was kind of an aperitif beverage marketed similarly to Lillet or Dubonnet, or any of the aperitif spirits of the time." Since he (presumably) calls for the Rose's stuff in Forgotten Cocktails, perhaps he discovered new information?

Edited by slkinsey, 28 January 2008 - 01:19 PM.

Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#85 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 01:28 PM

[...]
And also interestingly, back in 2002 Doc said that "as I reckon, Kola Tonic (a brand name being Toni-Cola, made by the Secrestat Bitters folks) was kind of an aperitif beverage marketed similarly to Lillet or Dubonnet, or any of the aperitif spirits of the time."  Since he (presumably) calls for the Rose's stuff in Forgotten Cocktails, perhaps he discovered new information?

View Post

The Cocktaildb doesn't seem to differentiate between Kola Tonic (as in Rose's or Clayton's) and Cola Beverages (as in Coca Cola). Some of the other cocktails which call for "Kola Tonic" are called things like "Clayton's Cocktail" and all show a picture of Cola Beverages on cocktaildb. I suspect it is a data management problem on the Cocktaildb side and have mentioned it to them in the past.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#86 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 02:01 PM

The Filmograph is one of the drinks featured in Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails.  I believe Doc says something like "substitute lemon juice for the lemon syrup unless you enjoy drinking maple syrup straight from the bottle."  In cases like this, it's never quite clear what was meant by "lemon syrup."  It could mean a lemon-infused simple syrup, or simply fresh lemon juice with some sweetener added.

View Post

Well, no not really. The recipe calls for "Sirop-de-Citron" not Lemon Syrup, so it is pretty clear that is exactly what is intended. It is a well known ingredient in France and Europe. If the recipe called for "Sweetened Lemon Juice" or "Lemonade" it would be another matter.

There is a recipe for Sirop-de-Citron, in French, on this page:

Limoncello, sirop de citron, et financiers citronnes

What is a bit unclear is whether the current Monin Lemon Syrup marketed in the US bears any resemblance to homemade (or quality commercial) Sirop-de-Citron.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#87 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,107 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 28 January 2008 - 02:11 PM

Hmm. Is the Savoy version the first in print? It seems unlikely to me that there would be a drink from that era calling for equal parts brandy and flavored syrup.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#88 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 04:17 PM

Hmm.  Is the Savoy version the first in print?  It seems unlikely to me that there would be a drink from that era calling for equal parts brandy and flavored syrup.

View Post

To the best of my knowledge, no one has found an earlier source for the Filmograph than the Savoy.

Chuckle, what you mean like these?

Clayton’s Special Cocktail
1/2 Bacardi Rum.
1/4 Kola Tonic.
1/4 Sirop-de-citron.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Elixir Cocktail
1/2 Kola Tonic.
1/2 Calvados.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Kola Tonic Cocktail
1/3 Dry Gin.
2/3 Kola Tonic.
2 Dashes Orange Bitters.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

RE-VIGORATOR COCKTAIL.
1/2 Gin.
1/4 Kola Tonic.
1/4 Sirop-de-citron.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Clayton’s Pussyfoot Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron.
1/4 Orange Juice.
1/2 Kola Tonic.
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass

Clayton’s Temperance Cocktail
1/4 Sirop-de-citron.
3/4 Kola Tonic.
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.


And in that case, I was just looking for Kola Tonic. There're plenty that don't even have booze, just liqueur. For example:

Ethel Cocktail
1/3 Apricot Brandy.*
1/3 White Crème de Menthe.
1/3 Curacao
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.


*Edit. I suppose there is some remote chance that the Ethel is calling for 1/3 Apricot Eau-de-Vie instead of Apricot liqueur. Even in that case, it's still 2/3 liqueur.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#89 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,107 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 28 January 2008 - 04:30 PM

Erik, that is assuming that the historical Kola Tonic is identical (or similarly sweet) to the Rose's product today, yes? If it were more similar to what Doc describes as perhaps "an aperitif beverage" it wouldn't be so sweet, no? More like a sweet vermouth?

I'm not really sure what the deal is with respect to the Filmograph. Just speculating.

Doc's update for modern tastes and ingredients is

2 oz : brandy
3/4 oz : lemon juice
1/2 oz : kola tonic
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#90 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 28 January 2008 - 05:21 PM

Not trying to shut you down, just pointing out that there are plenty of cocktails from that era which are very sweet. Cocktails of 1/2 liqueur or all liqueur are not uncommon.

I dunno how the current South African Rose's Kola Tonic compares to ToniCola. I do really wish I could compare it to Clayton's Kola Tonic, which I believe is still made, and apparently contributed its name to many of these cocktails containing Kola Tonic.

I'd also like to know how a decent homemade Sirop-de-Citron compares to the pretty crap, (by my own admission,) Monin Lemon Syrup.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA