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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2007–2008)


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#511 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 11:03 PM

Boy that's an odd one, no doubt.
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#512 evo-lution

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 10:10 AM

Not exactly sure why I picked this wine, but it does really work in this cocktail.  And plus, afterwards, you're left with most of a delicious (and reasonable) bottle of Loire white.  I don't know about you, but I certainly won't complain about that.


Just speculating as I've never tried this drink, but would a white wine with pronounced citrus flavours (for example a Reisling) be the perfect wine for this drink?

Odd drink though, must be said. :smile:
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#513 eje

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 10:46 AM

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Modder River Cocktail

1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1/4 Caperitif. (1/2 oz St. Raphael Gold)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz North Shore Distiller's No. 11)
(dash Angostura Orange Bitters)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze orange peel over glass and discard.)

An enjoyable, if a bit odd combination.

Still no real idea what sort of "Aperitif" Caperitif was, so continuing to experiment with various aperitif wines.

St. Raphael Gold is growing on me. It does really remind me of Sherry, so it is a good contrast here to the Dry Vermouth.

With Daylight savings time ending today, this may be the last natural light photo for a while. Or maybe tonight, if I get a chance to make a few cocktails.

edit- Forgot the orange bitters I put in the drink.

Edited by eje, 01 November 2008 - 12:49 PM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#514 eje

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Posted 01 November 2008 - 11:36 AM

By the way, the Modder River is a river in South Africa that forms part of the border between the Northern Cape and the Free State provinces.

It was, apparently, also the site of one of the rather famous battles during the Boer war.

Battle of Modder River

British tactics, little changed from the Crimea, used at Modder River, Magersfontein, Colenso and Spion Kop were incapable of winning battles against entrenched troops armed with modern magazine rifles. Every British commander made the same mistake; Buller; Methuen, Roberts and Kitchener. When General Kelly-Kenny attempted to winkle Cronje’s commandoes out of their riverside entrenchments at Paardeburg using his artillery, Kitchener intervened and insisted on a battle of infantry assaults; with the same disastrous consequences as Colenso, Modder River, Magersfontein and Spion Kop.


Not a great day for the British...
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#515 eje

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Posted 02 November 2008 - 12:10 PM

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Moll Cocktail

(6 People)
2 Glasses Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Glasses Sloe Gin. (3/4 oz Lindesfarne Sloe Gin)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
Add a few drops of Orange Bitters (1 drop Angostura Orange Bitters) and sugar (dash Depaz Cane Syrup) to taste.

Shake (stir?) and serve in cocktail glasses.

Vermouth, strangely, seemed to be the dominant element in the Moll cocktail.

A perfectly fine, if a bit dull, cocktail.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#516 eje

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 01:32 PM

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Monkey Gland Cocktail

3 Dashes Absinthe. (1 teaspoon Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)
3 Dashes Grenadine. (2 teaspoons Homemade Grenadine)
1/3 Orange Juice. (1 1/2 oz Orange Juice)
2/3 Dry Gin. (3 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

According to Robert Vermeire, "This cocktail is very popular in Deauville and London. Harry McElhone, the well-known bartender of Ciro’s Club, invented it."

Here is Mr. McElhone's version from "Barflies and Cocktails": 1 dash of Absinthe; 1 teaspoonful of Grenadine; ½ Orange Juice; ½ Gordon Gin.

He also notes, "Invented by the Author, and deriving its name from Voronoff’s experiments in rejuvenation."

Voronoff's's "experiments in rejuvenation" allegedly refers to therapeutically implanting monkey, uh, parts.

Some details from the wikpedia article:

In his book Rejuvenation by Grafting (1925), Voronoff describes what he believes are some of the potential effects of his surgery. While "not an aphrodisiac", he admits the sex drive may be improved. Other possible effects include better memory, the ability to work longer hours, the potential for no longer needing glasses (due to improvement of muscles around the eye), and the prolonging of life. Voronoff also speculates that the grafting surgery might be beneficial to sufferers of "dementia praecox", the mental illness known today as schizophrenia.


In the 1930s, thousands of people took this treatment, but by the 1940s it had fallen out of favor as scientific studies failed to show any benefit, beyond the placebo effect, to Voronoff's treatments.

Anyway, made a double batch of Monkey Glands thinking Mrs. eje or the house guests would enjoy them. However, aside from me, no one seemed particularly taken with the cocktail.

Edited by eje, 03 November 2008 - 01:46 PM.

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#517 slkinsey

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 01:41 PM

However, aside from me, no one seemed particularly taken with the cocktail.

Really?! It's one of Mrs. slkinsey's all-time favorites (although we follow the McElhone formulation). Fresh-squeezed OJ is a must.

Edited by slkinsey, 03 November 2008 - 01:42 PM.

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#518 jmfangio

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 02:14 PM

However, aside from me, no one seemed particularly taken with the cocktail.

Really?! It's one of Mrs. slkinsey's all-time favorites (although we follow the McElhone formulation). Fresh-squeezed OJ is a must.

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I've always made this with blood oranges, and find that their flavor works particularly well, in addition to the lovely color.

This also one of the few pre-Prohibition cocktails that like just as much, and sometimes prefer, with Pernod instead of Absinthe. Or, if going with Absinthe, for my palate the sweeter, more anise forward Kubler works better than the Verte de Fougerolles.

Blood oranges should be coming into season soon. Give this another try, perhaps, so all those poor monkeys need not have died in vain?
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#519 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 02:21 PM

I like this drink, although I wouldn't put it on my list of favorites and I can understand why it divides people...large quantities of oj mixed with gin can sometimes highlight the peculiar qualities that non gin lovers find objectionable. OJ and anise is also, I think, something that is going to taste odd to a novice palate. Odd flavors are a funny thing, people either really like them or really don't care for them. I think the Monkey Gland is a good example of this.
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#520 eje

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 03:05 PM

Well, I was more or less following the Savoy recipe, so perhaps over did it a bit on the Absinthe. McElhone's 1 dash per cocktail may be more sensible than the 3 dashes the Savoy Cocktail Book calls for.

Verte de Fougerolles is a pretty intense flavorant. More than once I've discovered I've added too much to a cocktail when I thought I was being conservative. I don't usually mind the flavor, but those less fond of Absinthe may.

Just to be a stickler, I'm not sure that the Monkey Gland was exactly a "Pre-Prohibition" cocktail. Voronoff's experiments were in vogue during the 1920s and 1930s. According to wikipedia, his first transplant of a Monkey Gland into a human took place in 1920.

McElhone was at Ciro's in London prior to taking over Harry's American Bar in Paris in 1923. So, probably, this cocktail was invented, or at least named, some time between 1920 and 1923.

Given that timing, odds are this cocktail was probably made with the newly available* Wormwood free Pernod.

*From this Coctkailtimes article: Absinthe was banned in 1910 in the Switzerland, 1912 in the US, and 1914 in France. In 1920, France again allowed the production of anise flavored drinks. Pernod's new Wormwood free formulation was one of the first out of the gate.

Edited by eje, 03 November 2008 - 03:27 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
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#521 David Santucci

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 08:40 PM

However, aside from me, no one seemed particularly taken with the cocktail.

Really?! It's one of Mrs. slkinsey's all-time favorites (although we follow the McElhone formulation). Fresh-squeezed OJ is a must.

View Post

I'm with slkinsey, but I hated this one the first time I made it. It really depends what recipe you use. I believe it is Dr. Cocktail's that won me over. Pretty similar to McElhone: 1.5, 1.5, 1 tsp, 1 tsp.

#522 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 10:58 PM

Well, I was more or less following the Savoy recipe, so perhaps over did it a bit on the Absinthe.  McElhone's 1 dash per cocktail may be more sensible than the 3 dashes the Savoy Cocktail Book calls for.

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Or it could be that 1 tsp is far too large a quantity for 3 dashes. I know we've had the dash discussion before, but I think that at the very least Absinthe, with it's powerful flavor and lingering presence, should be measured like bitters, preferably in an emptied bitters bottle, dashed in the same way (for me this means 8 dashes = 1 tsp, more or less). So maybe a scant 1/2 tsp would have been better.
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#523 eje

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 11:11 PM

Or it could be that 1 tsp is far too large a quantity for 3 dashes. I know we've had the dash discussion before, but I think that at the very least Absinthe, with it's powerful flavor and lingering presence, should be measured like bitters, preferably in an emptied bitters bottle, dashed in the same way (for me this means 8 dashes = 1 tsp, more or less). So maybe a scant 1/2 tsp would have been better.

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Well, I was making two drinks, so it would have been about a half teaspoon for 3 dashes per drink.

I do take your point, however about Absinthe in bitters bottles. Keep meaning to fill one with Absinthe the next time I finish a bottle of bitters.

I do also really Verte de Fougerolles is a bit more touchy to mix with than Kubler or Lucid.

Still, I found the cocktail perfectly acceptable and enjoyable.

It was just the Mrs. and the house guests who weren't so fond of it.
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Erik Ellestad
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#524 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 03 November 2008 - 11:17 PM

Or it could be that 1 tsp is far too large a quantity for 3 dashes. I know we've had the dash discussion before, but I think that at the very least Absinthe, with it's powerful flavor and lingering presence, should be measured like bitters, preferably in an emptied bitters bottle, dashed in the same way (for me this means 8 dashes = 1 tsp, more or less). So maybe a scant 1/2 tsp would have been better.

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Well, I was making two drinks, so it would have been about a half teaspoon for 3 dashes per drink.

I do take your point, however about Absinthe in bitters bottles. Keep meaning to fill one with Absinthe the next time I finish a bottle of bitters.

I do also really Verte de Fougerolles is a bit more touchy to mix with than Kubler or Lucid.

Still, I found the cocktail perfectly acceptable and enjoyable.

It was just the Mrs. and the house guests who weren't so fond of it.

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I haven't had the VdF or Kubler, but I do my at-home mixing with Jade Edouard, which people say is fairly potent, flavor-wise. I like Absinthe, so adding too much doesn't bother me but yeah I'm kind of glad that the Lucid we have at work is more mild/forgiving.
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#525 Carlo A. Balistrieri

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 05:27 AM

Eje,

Have you figured out what it cost you to accumulate the ingredients to make all the drinks in the book? That's got to be some rack of bottles (some more esoteric than others--I imagine a fair number weren't that easy to find)!
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#526 eje

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 10:55 AM

Eje,

Have you figured out what it cost you to accumulate the ingredients to make all the drinks in the book? That's got to be some rack of bottles (some more esoteric than others--I imagine a fair number weren't that easy to find)!

View Post


Honestly, I have no real idea.

I'm really pretty pathetic when it comes to keeping track of my personal finances, aside from being sure that the bills are paid and the credit card carries no balance, especially over a period of years.

I do, however, go through an awful lot of Gin and Vermouth!
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#527 eje

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 11:32 PM

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Monte Carlo Imperial Cocktail

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Broker's Gin)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 White Crème de Menthe. (1/2 oz Brizard White Creme de Menthe)

Shake well and strain into medium-size glass and fill up with Champagne (Louis Bouillot Cremant de Bourgogne Rose Perle d'Aurore).

Was explaining to the house guests the nature of the Savoy Stomp, and they were asking about what cocktails were coming up. The Creme de Menthe here certainly caught their attention. "Sounds Horrible!" "How many more cocktails do you have to make?" and similar.

Those of us who tried the Monte Carlo Imperial found it far less awful than you might imagine. Helps, I suppose, that the Brizard Creme de Menthe is not an awful liqueur. General response was, "If someone was offering it to me and nothing better, I wouldn't turn it down."

It is, nothing but a French 75 with Creme de Menthe as a sweetener instead of sugar.

The mint makes it a bit girly, but certainly nothing near the "pour down the sink" category. In fact, not at all far from the well regarded Old Cuban.

Edited by eje, 05 November 2008 - 11:34 PM.

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#528 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 12:07 AM

The Monte Carlo Imperiale sounds like it has a truly delicious, and not just drinkable, formula waiting to be coaxed out of that ingredient combo. I just know there's got to be something delicious that can be made with Creme de Menthe besides Stingers.
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#529 eje

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 10:00 AM

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Montpelier Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Jackalope Gin)

Shake (I'd stir) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a pickled pearl onion (or three).

I guess this is where the missing onion in the Gibson went!

Every Thursday at the Mixoloseum chat room we host an event called "Thursday Drink Night". A theme is picked and folks show up. Suggest a drink. Try other peoples' suggested drinks. Insult each others' Moms. That sort of thing. Because it starts on East Coast time, I'm usually at work at the beginning, out to dinner for the middle, and show up for the bitter end.

However, fun to take the odd second out from the end of my work day and chat with other drink obsessed folks.

This week the theme was "Gin" and they suggested you buy a new bottle to try and post the drink you made with it.

We have guests this week at home, so I wasn't going to be able to do that.

So, instead I tried to take both TDN and the Savoy Stomp out into the real world.

I stopped by Alembic Bar in the upper Haight on my way to dinner and asked the bartender there, Buffalo, to make me a 2-1 Gibson with Jackalope gin.

He obliged, and thus the blurry camera phone photo above.

Jackalope was only OK in the Montpelier. I'd say it is a bit lightly flavored to be used in a cocktail heavy in vermouth. For better or worse, I could barely tell there was gin in the drink.

Speaking of Alembic, they've started a blog: Alembic Bar. Check it out.

Edited by eje, 07 November 2008 - 10:42 AM.

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#530 eje

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Posted 15 November 2008 - 04:10 PM

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Moonlight Cocktail
(6 People)

1 1/2 Glasses Grape-fruit Juice. (3/4 oz fresh Grapefruit Juice)
2 Glasses Gin. (1 oz Broker's Gin)
1/2 Glass Kirsch. (1/4 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
2 Glasses White Wine. (1 oz Les Domains Tatins, 2007, Quincy/Domaine du Tremblay)

Add ice and shake thoroughly. Serve by placing in each glass a thin shaving of lemon peel.

A very dry cocktail.


I mentioned the ingredients to this cocktail to some drinky friends and they said, "That's a Boudreauing Wine-tini!" Ahem. Well, as we all know by now, there truly is very little new under the sun, whether it is the use of fresh herbs and spices in cocktails or wine.

It is actually a pleasant cocktail, more along the lines of a punch, almost, than what I usually think of as the typical cocktail flavor palette. And, yes, it is a very dry cocktail!
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#531 Capn Jimbo

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 07:16 AM

Tobacco-infused rum certainly sounds fascinating, but be careful about extracting too much nicotine, which is very poisonous by itself. I remember reading several years ago that a can of snuff contains a lethal dose of nicotine if you extract it correctly. Apparently 1-3 drops of pure or nearly pure stuff will kill within 15 min.

So try it, cos it sounds really neat, but do be careful.

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The notion of infusing rum with tobacco is certainly attractive, esp. as rum and smoking cigars just seems to go together. Here's my analysis and it isn't pretty...

It is certainly true that alcohol - particularly in excess - can lead to erosion and cancers of the oral-esophogeal route. I see plenty of that in my practice. I've come to terms myself based on the data that alcohol - in moderation - is really quite a low risk.

The same is not true of tobacco in any form or by any route. All it takes is for the carcinogen to modify just one cell in your body. And some of us possess genes that make us very susceptible to even very limited exposure to carcinogens in tobacco.

A cigar contains more carcinogens than a pack of cigarettes. It is not simply an equivalent. And it is VERY important to note that via the route of smoking, most of these carcinogens are lost to the atmosphere and never enter the body. Without any data in front of me, I'll take what I consider my worst case smoking analysis, and assume that 10% of the available carcinogens are absorbed. I daresay the actual amount absorbed by smoking is much less than that.

Infusion is quite another matter.

Most if not all of the carcinogens will infuse into the rum and will accordingly be taken into the body. Based on my assumption this is more like a carton of cigarettes at the least, and very likely much more. Based on about 24 ounces per 750 ml bottle of rum, 10 packs of cigarettes per carton, and 20 cigarettes per pack: a two ounce drink would be at least the equivalent of smoking 16 cigarettes in 20 minutes!

I sincerely believe the real number is higher.

If you choose to infuse rum with tobacco, I believe you are taking some very real risks with not only heavy exposure to carcinogens, but possible nicotine poisoning.

#532 eje

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 11:45 AM

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Moonraker Cocktail
(6 People)

Pour into the shaker 2 glasses of Brandy (3/4 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy), 2 of Quinquina (3/4 oz Lillet Rouge) and 2 of Peach Brandy (3/4 oz Massenez Creme de Peche). Add 3 dashes of Absinthe (drop or two of North Shore Sirene Absinthe), shake (I stirred) vigorously and serve.

Moonraker seems like such an evocative name, I have always wondered a bit what it referred to. The two main possibilities seem to be a certain type of sail or a reference to a British folk tale.

The Legend of the Moonrakers (link to swindonweb site)

A pair of Wiltshiremen, engaged in smuggling brandy, hide a barrel of the contraband from the excisemen in a nearby pond and when they return at some later time, in the dark, they are caught in the act of raking the barrel back to land. They immediately claim that they are trying to rake cheese - the reflection of the moon - from the pond and the excisemen, amused by the apparently simple-minded rustics, leave them to it.


Why on earth Ian Fleming would name a book about a plot to use a nuclear weapon to destroy London after this legend, I have no idea.

I was also puzzled by the use of the generic term "Quinquina" for an ingredient. Notes to friendly cocktail experts unfortunately yielded no results, leaving me to rely on my own google-rific conclusions. When examining the results of an image search for "Quinquina" almost all the products which come up seem to be dark or red colored. Dubonnet Rouge comes up quite frequently, but it seems there were a number of other Quinquinas available.

Some friends were cleaning their liquor cabinet and gave me a barely used bottle of Lillet Rouge. Thought it would be appropriate, given the results of my searches.

Used Peach Liqueur, as I don't really have anything else peachy in the house. Hard to say if this should be peach eau-de-vie, aged peach brandy, or peach liqueur.

With the peach liqueur, this is a pretty sweet cocktail. It is, however, pretty tasty. If you were casting about for after dinner options, you could certainly do a lot worse.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#533 eje

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 11:53 AM

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Moonshine Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Gin. (1 1/2 oz Martin Miller's Gin)
2 Glasses French Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)
1 Glass Maraschino. (1 barspoon Luxardo Maraschino)

Before shaking add a drop of Absinthe Bitters (Gin and Wormwood). (Add an Olive.)

OK, I cheated slightly on the Maraschino amount. It should have been 1/2 oz, not a barspoon. Just seemed like it would be a bit much, and frankly, 1 teaspoon was plenty.

A fine, but not outstanding cocktail.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#534 slkinsey

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 01:39 PM

There is an interesting and delicious cocktail that's very similar: 2 oz gin, 1 oz vermouth bianco, 1 tsp maraschino and a few dashes of bitters.
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#535 eje

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 05:48 PM

There is an interesting and delicious cocktail that's very similar:  2 oz gin, 1 oz vermouth bianco, 1 tsp maraschino and a few dashes of bitters.

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I'll have to try that.

The Moonshine is also quite similar to the certifiably delicious Savoy "Imperial Cocktail". 1/2 Dry Gin, 1/2 Dry Vermouth, 1 dash Maraschino, Angostura bitters. Stir, strain, olive.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#536 eje

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 10:22 AM

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Morning Cocktail

2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Maraschino. (2/3 tsp Luxardo Maraschino)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters)
2 Dashes Absinthe. (1/2 tsp Sirene Absinthe Verte)
1/2 Brandy. (1 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

Shake (well, if you really want to shake, shake. Recommend stirring, myself.) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a (Mmmm... Luxardo) cherry and squeeze lemon peel on top.

This recipe is verbatim from Harry McElhone's "Barflies and Cocktails" (and more likely "Harry's ABCs"). McElhone credits the recipe to "Harry Johnson of New Orleans". And indeed, it is to be found in the 1900 edition of Harry Johnson's "Bartenders' Manual" (Handily published by Mud Puddle Books: "Bartender's Manual".)

The only difference between Mr. McElhone's and Mr. Johnson's recipes is that Mr. McElhone calls for the Orange Bitters and Mr. Johnson calls for "3 or 4 dashes of bitters (Boker's Genuine Only)". Well, times change, and Boker's Bitters probably weren't available in London or Paris.

The recipe is a bit twiddly, with all the dashes of this and that.

In addition, I'm growing dissatisfied with the Lustau Brandy. It just doesn't have much presence in a drink or much length or depth on its own.

Despite that, I found the Morning Cocktail genuinely enjoyable. I was really surprised how dominant the citrus flavors of the cocktail were. There's some sort of interesting interaction going on between the Dry Vermouth, Curacao, and Lemon Twist.

Edited by eje, 24 November 2008 - 10:25 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#537 eje

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 09:11 AM

Posted Image

One of the really spiffy things about writing this pesky Savoy topic is that occasionally people you've met send you really cool stuff.

The other day I got an email from Stephan Berg, one of the proprietors of The Bitter Truth asking for my address. Having met him at Tales of the cocktail, he didn't seem particularly menacing. So I figured it would be safe to send him my contact info.

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The Bitter Truth Guys, Alexander Hauke and Stephan Berg, had recently released a Celery Seed Bitters and a reproduction of Jerry Thomas Decanter Bitters. I suppose I had an idle hope that they might send me some of those.

Instead they sent a brand new product, which they have created to honor the 75th Anniversary of the Repeal of Prohibition.

They bitters are quite complex. The initial flavors and scents are clove which give way to a front of mouth bitter flavor. Secondary flavors which come forward after that initial bitter burst are similar to root beer. I don't get much, if any citrus. Instead other flavors similar to culinary herbs and more bitterness linger in the aftertaste.

If you should desire to purchase these bitters, you can either mail order them from The Bitter Truth in Germany or, well, I've heard a rumor that a certain beleaguered retailer in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn, and self proclaimed "Bitter Bitch", has secured a few bottles.

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Morning Glory Cocktail

3 Dashes Gomme Syrup. (1 tsp. rich simple syrup)
2 Dashes Curacao. (2/3 tsp. Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Bitters. (2 dashes Bitter Truth Repeal Bitters)
1 Dash Absinthe. (1 dash North Shore Sirene Absinthe)
1 Liqueur Glass Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Lustau Reserve Brandy)
1 Liqueur Glass Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Anchor 2006 Hotaling's Whiskey)
1 Piece Lemon Peel, twisted to express the oil.
Two Small Pieces of Ice.

Stir thoroughly and remove the ice. Fill the glass with seltzer water or plain soda, and stir with a teaspoon having a little sugar in it.

Well if you've got old-school bitters, handily, here's an old school drink.

As we have seen, much of the Cocktail's development was intimately connected to the search for a better hangover cure...When confronted by the "Cold grey light of dawn", the toper recognized it as "the great necessity of the age" the he should at once take some sort of "anti-fogmatic"..."eye-opener"..."bracer"..."corpse reviver" or "morning glory".


Quoting here from David Wondrich's introduction to the Morning Glory Cocktail in his book, "Imbibe!"

According to Wondrich, the Morning Glory Cocktail first appears in print in the 1887 edition of Jerry Thomas' Book and is pretty much verbatim as above.

The "remove the ice idea" is a bit silly. Perhaps sensible when ice was at more of a premium than it is today. I recommend, as does Mr. Wondrich, that you simply follow a procedure similar to a Sazerac. Chill a medium size serving glass with ice and water. Stir your cocktail in ice in a mixing glass or tin. Dump the ice from the chilled serving glass. Strain your cocktail into the chilled glass. Top up with soda.

While I was getting all old-school, I figured I might as well use Anchor Distilling's Hotaling's Whiskey in this cocktail. Seemed like it would combine well with brandy.

And indeed. Uh, wow. After a couple sips, it felt like my scalp was floating a few feet above the top of my head.

No idea what might happen, if you follow Mr. Wondrich's other piece of advice and listen to that, "anarchic little voice in your head that suggests substituting champagne for the selzer."

And, oh yeah, speaking of cool things, it looks like the cool people at Alembic Bar may be re-launching their "Savoy Nights" some time next month. Still a little squooshy, with details to follow, but if yer gonna be in the San Francisco area on Sunday the 14th of December, put it on the calendar.

Edited by eje, 25 November 2008 - 09:14 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#538 eje

eje
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Posted 26 November 2008 - 07:18 AM

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Moulin Rouge Cocktail

3 Dashes Grenadine. (1 barspoon homemade grenadine)
1/2 Apricot Brandy. (1 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot)
1/4 Orange Gin. (1/2 oz Orange Juice. Wait a sec! Oh, goddamn it!)
1/4 Lemon Juice. (1/2 oz Lemon Juice)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Here I was getting all in a bother about how weird the next cocktail looks, and I totally screwed the pooch on this one.

Orange Gin, not Orange Juice.

I was wondering why this cocktail had no booze!

In any case, as made, this isn't awful. In fact it's kind of tasty, in a kiddie cocktail kind of way. Heck, double the size or maybe serve it over rocks, and it would be a pretty awesome breakfast drink.

Sigh, I guess this will be a "do over" later tonight.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#539 slkinsey

slkinsey
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Posted 26 November 2008 - 08:57 AM

How are you going to make the orange gin? I've occasionally tried to fake that up by microplaning an orange's worth of zest into several ounces of gin for a brief infusion.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#540 mkayahara

mkayahara
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  • Location:Guelph, Ontario

Posted 26 November 2008 - 09:08 AM

Doesn't Beefeater produce an orange gin? (Not that it's necessarily any good...)
Matthew Kayahara
Kayahara.ca
@mtkayahara