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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2009–)


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#91 David Santucci

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:49 AM

This version of the Opera is too sweet for me. Tastes like perfumey, wine candy. My first instinct was to increase the Dubonnet Rouge to 3/4 oz and reduce the Maraschino to a bar spoon. That version lacked zest. I think somewhere around a quarter ounce of Maraschino would be about right. A dash or two of Angostura bitters wouldn’t hurt, either.

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Funny you weren't so hot on the Opera, I have always been a big fan. `Course I tend to make it in a 2:3/4:1/4 ratio. `Course I also tend to substitute Rye for the Gin (and call it the Opry). Good cocktial, though. Think I might have to get me a bottle of Dubonnet and make a couple of these...

#92 Splificator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:03 AM

The instructions to put it on ice for half an hour are puzzling. When I’ve run across other recipes like this in the book, bartenders often say things like, “there is no way this cocktail would ever be made in a bar.” I’ve also assumed the same, thinking these would be for home parties and the like. However, thinking about it a bit more this time, I wonder if this might be a pre-mixed cocktail. If it was served in a bar, the bartender might have it mixed, sitting on ice, and ready to chill and serve.

I've long harbored a suspicion that all the "6 people" recipes in the Savoy come from a common source, some pamphlet or booklet that has escaped our notice. There are 55 of them (56 if you count the Pineapple Julep), only a tiny handful of which have turned up elsewhere: the Martinez is, well, the Martinez, and the Ping-Pong Special and the Diabola are adapted from Robert Vermiere. None of them were associated with Harry Craddock in the media of the day, and they all have a certain country-house, Jeeves-bring-in-the-drinks-tray quality to them. The ingredients are certainly more continental and British than American, but that could be Craddock's editing.
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#93 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:19 AM

The instructions to put it on ice for half an hour are puzzling. When I’ve run across other recipes like this in the book, bartenders often say things like, “there is no way this cocktail would ever be made in a bar.” I’ve also assumed the same, thinking these would be for home parties and the like. However, thinking about it a bit more this time, I wonder if this might be a pre-mixed cocktail. If it was served in a bar, the bartender might have it mixed, sitting on ice, and ready to chill and serve.

I've long harbored a suspicion that all the "6 people" recipes in the Savoy come from a common source, some pamphlet or booklet that has escaped our notice. There are 55 of them (56 if you count the Pineapple Julep), only a tiny handful of which have turned up elsewhere: the Martinez is, well, the Martinez, and the Ping-Pong Special and the Diabola are adapted from Robert Vermiere. None of them were associated with Harry Craddock in the media of the day, and they all have a certain country-house, Jeeves-bring-in-the-drinks-tray quality to them. The ingredients are certainly more continental and British than American, but that could be Craddock's editing.

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The measure of "dessert spoon" does not appear in any single serving recipe either does it? Sounds more like something a home hobbyist would use than a professional bartender.
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#94 Splificator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:58 AM

The measure of "dessert spoon" does not appear in any single serving recipe either does it? Sounds more like something a home hobbyist would use than a professional bartender.

Yeah, exactly. Also noteworthy is the call for a "small teaspoon" and, of course, the use of "glasses" to measure things instead of proportions as in the general run of Craddock's drinks. Plus a lot of the ingredients are hardly standard bar stock: jellies and marmalades, lemon syrup, fresh peaches and apricots, etc.

Craddock's book was a lightly-edited catch-all, with many books plundered wholesale; this certainly seems like another one.
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#95 eje

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:58 AM

The measure of "dessert spoon" does not appear in any single serving recipe either does it? Sounds more like something a home hobbyist would use than a professional bartender.

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Actually "dessertspoonful" does appear in the single serving Cat's Eye Cocktail, but that's the only one.

I don't know that the dessertspoon measure makes it an entirely open and shut case. I've got recipes in my black book that use the demi-spoons from coffee service for measures. Though it is usually dry ingredients, not bitters or the like.

Could be a single source, though, the ingredients in those recipes are fairly similar. Definitely someone very fond of Orange Bitters.

Another source I've been puzzling over lately is the missing South African bar book. I feel pretty certain that all the Caperitif containing recipes or those with names related to the Anglo Boer war have a single source. I also really doubt it is English, given how most of the battles and persons honored were not heroes of the Empire.
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#96 eje

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 12:02 PM

Erik,

Any word from them on when the Beefeater 24 is going to start showing up at retail in California?  I've been diligently checking the websites for Hi Time Wines and Beverage Warehouse (they're both usually pretty good about having new spirits sooner than anyone else), but no luck yet.

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I asked the PR firm representing Beefeater 24, and they said 6 months to a year for expansion outside of San Francisco and New York. Though they said they have gotten very good response to the product, so it is pretty much a given at this point that it will happen.

About your only choice at the moment would be ordering from a firm inside of one of those metropolitan areas. Or somehow convincing a friend who lives in either one to send you some.

Edited by eje, 02 June 2009 - 12:16 PM.

---
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#97 Splificator

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 12:08 PM

Another source I've been puzzling over lately is the missing South African bar book.  I feel pretty certain that all the Caperitif containing recipes or those with names related to the Anglo Boer war have a single source.  I also really doubt it is English, given how most of the battles and persons honored were not heroes of the Empire.

Yeah, I'm pretty sure there was a Caperitif brochure floating around the bar.
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There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#98 eje

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 09:28 AM

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Orange Bloom Cocktail.

1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Dolin Rosso)
1/4 Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater 24)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass and add a cherry.

I am not sure if it was the combination of the somewhat hot character of the Cointreau and the Beefeater 24, but even after a nice long stir to a quite cold temperature this was a very strongly alcohol smelling and flavored drink.

I don’t know about you, but whenever I smell alcohol based hand sanitizer at work or on public transit, I always think someone is hitting the vodka.

To me, this had a similar character.

Maybe a stronger flavored and sweeter vermouth would have been better at mitigating the hot character of these two strong spirits.
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#99 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 09:58 PM

Maybe a stronger flavored and sweeter vermouth would have been better at mitigating the hot character of these two strong spirits.

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Or a dash of [orange] bitters?
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#100 eje

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 08:33 AM

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Orange Blossom Cocktail.

1/2 Orange juice. (1 oz fresh squeezed Orange Juice)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Beefeater 24)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Robert Vermeire tells us this recipe was, “by Malloy of Pittsburg.”

Nothing complicated here. Orange Juice and gin, that’s it. More interesting than a screwdriver and less interesting than most other drinks. There are a few other Orange Blossom recipes ’round and about that are a bit more complicated than the Savoy. Some including sugar, grenadine, or honey syrup.

In regards the Beefeater 24, this was my third drink of the evening using it and the least successful. I was hoping the slightly complex flavor profile of the new gin would complement fruit juice and bring some extra character to the drink. Unfortunately, the opposite proved to be true, with the added complexity distracting from the simple pleasure and clean flavor of the freshly squeezed orange juice.
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Erik Ellestad
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#101 eje

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Posted 08 June 2009 - 09:25 AM

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Orange Martini Cocktail.
(6 People)
2 1/2 glasses of Gin. (1 1/4 oz Orange Gin)
2 glasses of French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Original Dry)
1 Glass of Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini and Rossi Rosso)

Steep in this mixture the finely-grated rind of 1 orange (carefully removing all the white pith.) Let it soak for one or two hours. Then add ice and shake (I stirred). Rinse out the glasses with Orange bitters (Angostura Orange Bitters).

I still had some orange peel infused No. 209 Gin sitting around the house from the last cocktail that called for "Orange Gin", so instead of taking the long way around, I just used it in this drink.

This was actually rather nice, as prepared above. Orangey and ginny with just a touch of sweetness from the sweet vermouth.
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Erik Ellestad
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#102 eje

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 11:55 AM

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Oriental Cocktail.
1/2 Rye Whisky. (1 1/2 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/4 White Curacao. (3/4 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
The Juice of 1/2 Lime.
Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

In August, 1924, an American Engineer nearly died of fever in the Philippines, and only the extraordinary devotion of Dr. B– saved his life.
As an act of gratitude the Engineer gave Dr. B– the recipe of this Cocktail.


To me, the Oriental Cocktail is a very modern tasting cocktail. Compared to many vintage cocktails, it has a fairly large portion of both sweet and sour, making it quite rich in flavor. If it didn’t have pesky Sweet Vermouth, it could go on just about any modern cocktail menu and be quite the crowd pleaser.

Personally, I find it a bit rich, but am never quite sure where to go with that. More Vermouth and less curacao and lime? 2 oz booze, 1/2 oz of everthing else? Certainly can think of worse ways to spend an evening than tweaking the proportions of the Oriental.

In any case, as enjoyable as the Oriental Cocktail is, I’m pretty sure Dr. B– got the better end of this deal!
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Erik Ellestad
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#103 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 03:04 PM

To me, the Oriental Cocktail is a very modern tasting cocktail. Compared to many vintage cocktails, it has a fairly large portion of both sweet and sour, making it quite rich in flavor. If it didn’t have pesky Sweet Vermouth, it could go on just about any modern cocktail menu and be quite the crowd pleaser.

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We actually did have this on one of our first menus, and it was a top seller, made more or less as you have it here. It's one of those favorites of mine that for some reason I don't seem to make very often.

I've seen this drink tweaked (Esquire Drinks?) to 2 oz rye, 1 oz vermouth, 1/2 oz each lime and curacao. It's a bit less sweet that way and if I recall, thats how we were making them when they were on the menu.
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#104 eje

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:50 AM

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Paddy Cocktail.

1/2 Paddy Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s 10 Year Single Malt Irish Whiskey)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Vermouth Rouge)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I thought the milder Irish Whiskey and milder Dolin Rouge would combine well in this cocktial. I was wrong.

To be honest, I just don’t like the Dolin Rouge as a mixer with any whiskey I have tried so far. In this case, it seems to highlight the flabby, malty flavors of the whiskey. The drink also ends up tasting a bit watery. Maybe I should have been a bit more generous with the bitters? Or maybe my Dolin Rouge has expired.

After this failure, whenever whiskey is called for, I’m back to Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth. Or Carpano Antica, if I’m feeling flush.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#105 bostonapothecary

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 10:13 AM

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Paddy Cocktail.

1/2 Paddy Irish Whisky. (1 oz Bushmill’s 10 Year Single Malt Irish Whiskey)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Dolin Vermouth Rouge)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I thought the milder Irish Whiskey and milder Dolin Rouge would combine well in this cocktial. I was wrong.

To be honest, I just don’t like the Dolin Rouge as a mixer with any whiskey I have tried so far. In this case, it seems to highlight the flabby, malty flavors of the whiskey. The drink also ends up tasting a bit watery. Maybe I should have been a bit more generous with the bitters? Or maybe my Dolin Rouge has expired.

After this failure, whenever whiskey is called for, I’m back to Martini and Rossi Sweet Vermouth. Or Carpano Antica, if I’m feeling flush.

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no stock or cinzano? they are my favorites for sweet. if the drink seemed flabby in the lack of acid sense i'd add dry sherry. if it seemed too thin and bland i'd go the red hook route and add a spoonful of liqueur.

i'm sipping dolin dry right now and i really enjoy it. i think i prefer it to some of the white wines i've been keeping around.
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#106 eje

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 12:19 PM

no stock or cinzano? they are my favorites for sweet.  if the drink seemed flabby in the lack of acid sense i'd add dry sherry.  if it seemed too thin and bland i'd go the red hook route and add a spoonful of liqueur.

i'm sipping dolin dry right now and i really enjoy it.  i think i prefer it to some of the white wines i've been keeping around.

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Haven't tried Stock. I'll have to try that next. Cinzano I don't remember being over fond of. Used to use it quite a lot at the beginning of the stomp, but then got distracted by Carpano. Could revisit, as it is cheap.
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Erik Ellestad
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#107 db_campbell

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 01:06 PM

no stock or cinzano? they are my favorites for sweet.  if the drink seemed flabby in the lack of acid sense i'd add dry sherry.  if it seemed too thin and bland i'd go the red hook route and add a spoonful of liqueur.

i'm sipping dolin dry right now and i really enjoy it.  i think i prefer it to some of the white wines i've been keeping around.

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Haven't tried Stock. I'll have to try that next. Cinzano I don't remember being over fond of. Used to use it quite a lot at the beginning of the stomp, but then got distracted by Carpano. Could revisit, as it is cheap.

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Boissiere is also worth a look, as it seems to possess some darker tones.

#108 eje

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 03:44 PM

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Pall Mall Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Teaspoonful White Crème de Menthe. (Brizard White Creme de Menthe)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet Vermouth)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Original Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Maybe I’m on crack, but I really enjoyed this cocktail. It was refreshing without being overwhelmingly sweet or over the top minty.

I suppose it is a sort of Martinez variation.

Not sure if the name is supposed to evoke Pall Mall cigarettes or what. But I have been known to be attracted to tobacco-ish or tobacco complementing flavors in alcoholic beverages.
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#109 shantytownbrown

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Posted 13 June 2009 - 04:28 PM

Not sure if the name is supposed to evoke Pall Mall cigarettes or what. But I have been known to be attracted to tobacco-ish or tobacco complementing flavors in alcoholic beverages.

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my guess it has more to do with the following quote from wikpedia, speaking of a street in London:

"Pall Mall is best known for being the home to various gentlemen's clubs built in the 19th century and early 20th centuries. These include the Athenaeum, Travellers Club, Army and Navy Club, Reform Club, United Services Club (now occupied by the Institute of Directors), Oxford and Cambridge Club and Royal Automobile Club"


just a thought, but interesting that you would get tobacco invocations from this given the Creme de menthe..
funny that my grandmother smoked Pall Malls, the loose tobacco in the bottom of her purse would mix with her Wint-o-green lifesavers, so today if i have that flavor lifesaver, i can still taste the Pall Mall tobacco...so maybe i'd like this drink too....

sb

#110 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 02:39 PM

Interesting, this drink is remarkably similar to the Barry cocktail from the Gentleman's Companion. Equal parts gin and Italian vermouth, a quarter ounce creme de menthe and orange bitters stirred. I took to rinsing the glass with the creme de menthe instead, really excellent drink.

#111 eje

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 10:40 AM

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Palmer Cocktail.

1 Dash Lemon Juice.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass Canadian Club Whisky. (2 oz Canadian Mist 1885 Special Reserve)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Even without sugar, there really shouldn’t be anything wrong with this. So little Angostura and lemon. But man, does this construction just seem to point up the weaknesses of this whisky. Just dreadful stuff. Totally constructed and artificial tasting. Bleah.

I’m going back to the non-traditional Alberta Springs, if this is the general state of Canadian Whisky.
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If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#112 David Santucci

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 12:27 PM

Just dreadful stuff. Totally constructed and artificial tasting. Bleah.

I’m going back to the non-traditional Alberta Springs, if this is the general state of Canadian Whisky.

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Ain't nothin' wrong with good old American Rye.

Edited by David Santucci, 15 June 2009 - 12:28 PM.


#113 Wild Bill Turkey

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 12:34 PM

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Sorry to be so late with this comment, but I love that glass.

#114 eje

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 01:08 PM

Sorry to be so late with this comment, but I love that glass.

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Neat, eh? My wife found a set of them on her last trip to Austin.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#115 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 02:07 PM

Just dreadful stuff. Totally constructed and artificial tasting. Bleah.

I’m going back to the non-traditional Alberta Springs, if this is the general state of Canadian Whisky.

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Ain't nothin' wrong with good old American Rye.

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Never had this particular bottling, but Canadian Mist, I think, remains the single most awful whisk(e)y I have ever tasted. I gave the bottle away after 3 attempts to make it palatable.
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#116 eje

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 09:23 AM

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Palmetto Cocktail.

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
1/2 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Martini & Rossi Sweet)
1/2 St. Croix Rum. (1 oz Cruzan Single Barrel)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Can’t believe I actually have an excuse to use Cruzan Single Barrel in a cocktail! We’ve had a few Rum and Italian Vermouth drinks before, but usually they call for Bacardi, which I take to mean a white Cuban style rum. And usually, with those white rums they aren’t very amazing, tasting more of Vermouth than Rum.

Here, on the other hand, is something quite enjoyable!

The rum has enough character to be complemented nicely by the Italian Vermouth and bitters. Yum.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#117 Chris Amirault

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 10:55 AM

Excellent: got each and every item, and the same desire to fit the Cruzan into a cocktail. There's tonight's drink.
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#118 Chris Amirault

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 06:35 PM

Excellent is right. Wonder how it'd work with Regan's -- tasty, I bet.
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#119 JAZ

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 06:57 PM

The only dark rum I currently have is Appleton 12 yr. Reserve. Would this drink work with that rum, or should I wait and buy a bottle of Cruzan?

#120 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 17 June 2009 - 07:33 PM

The only dark rum I currently have is Appleton 12 yr. Reserve. Would this drink work with that rum, or should I wait and buy a bottle of Cruzan?

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That has a very different character than Cruzan Single Barrel, would be far too heavy as a sub. You'll be glad to own a bottle of the CSB, and this is as good a reason as any to buy a bottle. Also makes awesome Milk Punch.
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