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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2009–)


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210 replies to this topic

#61 eje

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 09:08 AM

Canadian Club is not nearly as assertive as Sazerac Rye. 
I'd hazard that the canadian whisky and the vermouth work in concert to dampen the Campari's excesses in the original, rather than compete with it.

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As is typical, the original recipe in McElhone calls for Rye, not Canadian Whisky. It was only the editors (or bartenders) of the Savoy who swapped in "Canadian Club".

Whether they made that swap because American Rye Whiskey was unavailable during prohibition, because Canadian Whisky was preferred behind the bar at the Savoy for some reason, or because smoother blended whiskeys were becoming more fashionable at the time, I cannot say.

Folks who have tried vintage samples of Canadian Whisky tell me that the much of the modern stuff is much smoother.

Modern Canadian brands they suggest for "accurate" substitution include the Canadian Club 12 year and Wiser's 18 Year. Unfortunately, neither of these is easily available to me.

Edited by eje, 19 May 2009 - 09:09 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
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#62 eje

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:07 AM

[...]
Modern Canadian brands they suggest for "accurate" substitution include the Canadian Club 12 year and Wiser's 18 Year.  Unfortunately, neither of these is easily available to me.

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Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles and I've ordered Wiser's Very Old and Canadian Club 12 from Binny's in Chicago. Plus some North Shore Aquavit and Ransom Old Tom.

Will report back.
---
Erik Ellestad
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#63 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:09 AM

I've always found the Old Pal a problematic recipe: I wanted so badly to like it but it never really seemed to work all that well. Last night though I finally was able to drive up to Houston and visit Anvil (which is fabulous beyond my wildest expectations, but more on that later perhaps) and Bobby made my friend an Old Pal, using new N-P and Rittenhouse BIB. It was terriffic, and I think part of what helped was the inspired garnish of a flamed orange zest that had been studded with a clove, lighting the clove and using that as the fire source. The subtle accent really took it to the next level.
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#64 bostonapothecary

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:35 AM

Plus some North Shore Aquavit
Will report back.

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i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?
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#65 eje

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:45 AM

i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?

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I like Linie a lot, myself, but it may be some sort of genetic predisposition, being Norwegian and all.

As far as American Aquavit goes, I find House Spirits Krogstad to be a bit heavy on the Star Anise for my taste and mixing preferences. But I like all the other North Shore products I've tried, so I'm willing to give it a whirl. Sadly, no Aquavit cocktails in the Savoy.

Really pretty excited about the Ransom Old-Tom, as I've heard very good things about it from friends in the Pacific Northwest.
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#66 TVC

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 11:21 AM

How the Aquavit from he North Ogdenville distillery?

http://www.hulu.com/...avi#x-4,vclip,1

i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?

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I like Linie a lot, myself, but it may be some sort of genetic predisposition, being Norwegian and all.

As far as American Aquavit goes, I find House Spirits Krogstad to be a bit heavy on the Star Anise for my taste and mixing preferences. But I like all the other North Shore products I've tried, so I'm willing to give it a whirl. Sadly, no Aquavit cocktails in the Savoy.

Really pretty excited about the Ransom Old-Tom, as I've heard very good things about it from friends in the Pacific Northwest.

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#67 mkayahara

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 12:10 PM

Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles [...]

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Don't you hate it when that happens? :biggrin:

I can say, having tried an Old Pal with Wiser's Small Batch, that I wasn't that thrilled; I seem to recall thinking it tasted mostly like a glass of cold Campari. Which is fine, if that's what you're looking for, but I can't see it going into regular rotation alongside my usual Campari and sodas or Negronis. That said, maybe I should try it with some American rye and see how that is. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on the Canadian whiskies, Erik.
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#68 J_Ozzy

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 04:39 PM

Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles and I've ordered Wiser's Very Old and Canadian Club 12 from Binny's in Chicago.  Plus some North Shore Aquavit and Ransom Old Tom.

Will report back.


Heh, and you've made me want to purchase this:

http://www.goantique...an,1659809.html

(though I'd want to do a chemical analysis before trying any, and the bottle is in suspiciously good condition, and customs clearances would be problematic...)
edit: not to mention it's most likely some sort of re-release, given the capping material.

Edited by J_Ozzy, 19 May 2009 - 04:56 PM.


#69 eje

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 08:40 AM

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Olympic Cocktail.

1/3 Orange Juice. (1 oz Fresh Moro Blood Orange Juice)
1/3 Curacao. (1 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao)
1/3 Brandy. (1 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

A pleasant enough beverage, it was a bit of a waste of this rather nice Cognac. Between the Blood Orange Juice and the Curacao, I could have been using Korbel in this instead of the Dudognon. Cocktails like this are a good reason to keep a couple bottles around.

In any case, the Olympic beats the hell out of a Screwdriver.
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#70 eje

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Posted 23 May 2009 - 09:44 AM

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One Exciting Night Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 Dash Blood Orange Juice)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into Port Wine glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top. Frost edge of glass with castor sugar.

As always, your life will be much easier if you frost the edge of the glass before straining the cocktail into it.

However, faced with mandatory glass frosting in a not very tart cocktail, I opted for the more bitter flavors of Punt e Mes in this Bronx-like Cocktail. This at least provided some interesting contrasts between the bitter and sweet elements of the construction. Fairly enjoyable, but I would leave out the caster sugar, if making it for myself, even if it cut down on the excitement for the evening.
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Erik Ellestad
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#71 eje

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 11:20 AM

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Oom Paul Cocktail.

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth)
1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve struggled with various substitutions for “Caperitif” over the course of these cocktails, and I don’t know if it’s just that I really like Dolin Blanc, but it was a very interesting foil for the flavors of the Apple Brandy in this relatively simple cocktail.

Intrigued enough with the results, I remade it with Calvados Groult Reserve and enjoyed it even more. I’m not sure if I agree with one friend’s assertion that, “Calvados is always better,” but in this case it was definitely more interesting than the American Apple Brandy.

If you like Apple Brandies as much as I do, this is a great cocktail to become familiar with their character.

Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif. I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

From the Wikipedia entry for “Paul Kruger“:

Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (10 October 1825 – 14 July 1904), better known as Paul Kruger and affectionately known as Oom Paul (Afrikaans: “Uncle Paul”) was State President of the South African Republic (Transvaal). He gained international renown as the face of Boer resistance against the British during the South African or Second Boer War (1899-1902).


More information here: “Who Was Paul Kruger

Edited by eje, 25 May 2009 - 11:20 AM.

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#72 bostonapothecary

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 11:38 AM

a very interesting foil


i like the language. elevate by contrast!
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#73 slkinsey

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 03:18 PM

Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif.  I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

Interesting. I would have assumed that "Oom Paul" was a strange misspelling of "oop pah" -- as in "oom pah pah" waltz music played by German/Austrian brass bands.
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#74 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:04 AM

Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif.  I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

Interesting. I would have assumed that "Oom Paul" was a strange misspelling of "oop pah" -- as in "oom pah pah" waltz music played by German/Austrian brass bands.

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My first reaction as well...quite interesting the bit about Kruger.
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#75 eje

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 08:59 AM

Posted Image

Opal Cocktail
(6 People)

3 Glasses Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
2 Glasses Orange Juice. (1 oz Blood Orange Juice)
1 Glass of Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)
A little Sugar. (very little caster sugar)
Add a little Orange-flower water. (drop orange flower water)

Shake and serve.

Of course, re-doing this for one by dividing 2 oz Glasses in half and then dividing in half again. Hey, I can enjoy a drink and a half.

The Opal is not entirely unpleasant, though far more ginny and a bit harsher than would be popular in a modern cocktail. I think part of it might be the heat of the Cointreau.

No idea why it is called the Opal, as even with regular orange juice this would bear no resemblance to those gold-green gems.
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#76 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 09:14 AM

Just curious, and you may have already posted this but, why the blood orange juice? The drinks look beautiful with the deep crimson red, though I would imagine the flavor profile to be just different enough to be deemed as straying off the savoy path. It's an interesting choice, I would like to know the reason behind it.

#77 slkinsey

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 09:45 AM

I have, as a general rule of thumb, found blood orange juice to look a lot better than it tastes.

A few days ago I squeezed some fresh regular juice oranges, and they were far better than any blood orange juice I've ever had.
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#78 eje

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 09:52 AM

I have, as a general rule of thumb, found blood orange juice to look a lot better than it tastes.

A few days ago I squeezed some fresh regular juice oranges, and they were far better than any blood orange juice I've ever had.

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That's too bad. I guess the fresh blood oranges I buy from central valley farmers' at the market are better than the ones you get in NY.
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Erik Ellestad
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#79 eje

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 09:56 AM

Just curious, and you may have already posted this but, why the blood orange juice? The drinks look beautiful with the deep crimson red, though I would imagine the flavor profile to be just different enough to be deemed as straying off the savoy path. It's an interesting choice, I would like to know the reason behind it.

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Because they were in season at the time I made these drinks.

I stray off the Savoy path all the time, as variation in modern spirits, liqueur, and aperitif production pretty much make it impossible to stay on it in any strict sense of the word.

Unless I only used actual vintage spirits, I don't see how it would even be remotely possible to stay on the savoy path. And vintage aperitifs and liqueurs would likely be toast.
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Erik Ellestad
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#80 Chris Amirault

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:00 AM

Erik, I can't say I'm shocked to read that you use "fruit in season," as they say, and that taste matters to you. :wink:

As for the Savoy path, if you didn't stray from it regularly during this odyssey, I'd think that you'd be forced to stray from the path of sanity. Foolish consistency, all that.
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#81 eje

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:18 AM

I shouldn't be so flippant, I suppose.

We, here in CA, are ridiculously lucky with the quality of citrus we have, especially those of us lucky enough to have nearby farmers' markets.

I've tried Blood Oranges in other parts of the country, and found them to be pretty uninspiring.

The only conclusion I can come to is that Blood Oranges are both quite seasonal and do not travel well.

Even here, I really only like Moro Blood Oranges in the early part of the season, when they are still quite tart. Later in the year, when that berry-funkiness takes over, I do not usually buy them.
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#82 bostonapothecary

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:27 AM

I shouldn't be so flippant, I suppose.

We, here in CA, are ridiculously lucky with the quality of citrus we have, especially those of us lucky enough to have nearby farmers' markets.

I've tried Blood Oranges in other parts of the country, and found them to be pretty uninspiring.

The only conclusion I can come to is that Blood Oranges are both quite seasonal and do not travel well.

Even here, I really only like Moro Blood Oranges in the early part of the season, when they are still quite tart.  Later in the year, when that berry-funkiness takes over, I do not usually buy them.

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have you tried any sour oranges in savoy drinks? they have become one of my favorite things in life...
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#83 slkinsey

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:29 AM

I have, as a general rule of thumb, found blood orange juice to look a lot better than it tastes.

A few days ago I squeezed some fresh regular juice oranges, and they were far better than any blood orange juice I've ever had.

That's too bad. I guess the fresh blood oranges I buy from central valley farmers' at the market are better than the ones you get in NY.

Or I suppose it could mean that we have much better juice oranges.

I've had Moro and Sanguinello oranges in Italy... still didn't think they were all that special if you took away the color.
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#84 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 10:01 PM

I'm currently working on a batch of Blood orange bitters because of that awful Stirrings bottling, sounds like a good idea but, please put some sauce into it. Here in Tucson we only get that berry funkiness you spoke of, definitely understand what you mean. Thanks for explaining.

Edited by RoyalSwagger, 27 May 2009 - 10:07 PM.


#85 eje

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 08:26 AM

Posted Image

Opening Cocktail.

1/4 Grenadine. (1/2 oz Homemade Grenadine)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Punt e Mes)
1/2 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Alberta Premium Canadian Whisky)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, this seemed a bit sweet without some bittering agent. Stretched the rules a bit and used Punt e Mes. It’s just about the only Sweet vermouth we use at Alembic. Blame Daniel Hyatt. He’s a bad influence.

Like the “One Exciting Night” I enjoyed this more than I expected, with the Punt e Mes providing enough contrast and bitterness to counter the sweetness of the homemade grenadine. Enjoyable flavors too. Though if making it for myself again, I’d probably use 1 1/2 oz whiskey, 3/4 oz Punt e Mes, and a barspoon of Grenadine.

Edited by eje, 29 May 2009 - 08:26 AM.

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#86 eje

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Posted 31 May 2009 - 10:15 AM

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Opera Cocktail.

1/6 Maraschino. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
1/6 Dubonnet. (1/2 of 3/4 oz Dubonnet Rouge)
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Beefeater 24)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

This version of the Opera is too sweet for me. Tastes like perfumey, wine candy. My first instinct was to increase the Dubonnet Rouge to 3/4 oz and reduce the Maraschino to a bar spoon. That version lacked zest. I think somewhere around a quarter ounce of Maraschino would be about right. A dash or two of Angostura bitters wouldn’t hurt, either.

Posted Image

Received the Beefeater 24 from the folks promoting its launch in the US. Nice bottle, eh? It’s a pleasant gin, a bit more citrus forward than the regular Beefeater and perhaps a bit sweeter. I don’t get much flavor from the much ballyhooed inclusion of Japanese Green Tea. Perhaps the subtle character of green tea would show up in a simpler drink.
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Erik Ellestad
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#87 alacarte

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 09:39 AM

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One Exciting Night Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 Dash Blood Orange Juice)
1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Punt e Mes)
1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into Port Wine glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top. Frost edge of glass with castor sugar.

As always, your life will be much easier if you frost the edge of the glass before straining the cocktail into it.

However, faced with mandatory glass frosting in a not very tart cocktail, I opted for the more bitter flavors of Punt e Mes in this Bronx-like Cocktail. This at least provided some interesting contrasts between the bitter and sweet elements of the construction. Fairly enjoyable, but I would leave out the caster sugar, if making it for myself, even if it cut down on the excitement for the evening.

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Georgeous photo - it looks like something from the pages of Imbibe magazine!

#88 jmfangio

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 07:58 PM

Received the Beefeater 24 from the folks promoting its launch in the US. Nice bottle, eh? It’s a pleasant gin, a bit more citrus forward than the regular Beefeater and perhaps a bit sweeter. I don’t get much flavor from the much ballyhooed inclusion of Japanese Green Tea. Perhaps the subtle character of green tea would show up in a simpler drink.

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Erik,

Any word from them on when the Beefeater 24 is going to start showing up at retail in California? I've been diligently checking the websites for Hi Time Wines and Beverage Warehouse (they're both usually pretty good about having new spirits sooner than anyone else), but no luck yet.
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#89 eje

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 09:39 AM

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Orange Cocktail.
(6 People)
Take a glass and a half of fresh orange juice (3/4 oz Orange Juice) a dessert-spoonful of Orange Bitters (2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters), 3 glasses of Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin), a dessert-spoonful of sugar syrup (or a heaped spoonful of powdered sugar) (dash rich simple syrup) and nearly a glass of French Vermouth (1/2 oz Noilly Original Dry). Place the shaker on ice (in the fridge) for half an hour, and then shake with 2 or 3 large lumps of ice, so as not to produce too much water. Squeeze a piece of orange peel over each glass and serve.

I actually really liked the Orange Cocktail. Seems like it would be pretty simple, sort of a Bronx without the Sweet Vermouth. The orange bitters give it a nice refreshing zest, making it a appealing aperitif cocktail. Not too much orange juice, also makes it a bit closer to a Martini, than a Bronx.

The instructions to put it on ice for half an hour are puzzling. When I’ve run across other recipes like this in the book, bartenders often say things like, “there is no way this cocktail would ever be made in a bar.” I’ve also assumed the same, thinking these would be for home parties and the like. However, thinking about it a bit more this time, I wonder if this might be a pre-mixed cocktail. If it was served in a bar, the bartender might have it mixed, sitting on ice, and ready to chill and serve.
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#90 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 10:29 AM

The instructions to put it on ice for half an hour are puzzling. When I’ve run across other recipes like this in the book, bartenders often say things like, “there is no way this cocktail would ever be made in a bar.” I’ve also assumed the same, thinking these would be for home parties and the like. However, thinking about it a bit more this time, I wonder if this might be a pre-mixed cocktail. If it was served in a bar, the bartender might have it mixed, sitting on ice, and ready to chill and serve.

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What makes me curious is if doing this has any effect on the drink different than just shaking and straining or whatever. Odd instructions indeed.
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