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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2009–)


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#31 slkinsey

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Posted 25 April 2009 - 10:40 AM

I wonder if this is somehow related to a traditional Russian way of drinking tea, in which the drinker places a sugar cube or bit of preserves in the front of his mouth and sips the tea through the sugar or preserves?
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#32 eje

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 08:12 AM

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Night Cap Cocktail

The Yolk of 1 Egg.
1/3 Anisette. (3/4 oz Gantous and Abou Rad Arak)
1/3 Curacao. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/3 Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve written about “Arak” before in the blog post “Ar®a©k Disambiguation“. This "Arak" is the Anise flavored grape based spirit from Lebanon. Because there are various degrees of sweetness in Anisette and Anise flavored liqueurs and this drink is already 1/3 orange liqueur, I figured it would be fun to pretend it called for a dry style anise liqueur and use Arak instead of Anisette.

The Night Cap is also a fine example of me not being able to follow a recipe even though I try hard to read them and execute. I knew I was running low on Cointreau, so stopped to buy some on the way home.

Then I looked at the recipe. Checked for the Orange Curacao in the kitchen cupboard. Headed down to the basement to find the Arak. Came back upstairs and made the recipe with Cointreau. Why, I do not know. Sometimes my hands just don’t tell my brain what they are doing.

So, even though I didn’t really quite make the recipe accurately, ooops, this was quite tasty. Anise and orange are a proven great combination and the brandy brings some sort of other mediation to the party. Definitely an enjoyable cocktail, so I can’t see going back and doing it the “right” way.
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Erik Ellestad
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#33 eje

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 08:13 AM

I wonder if this is somehow related to a traditional Russian way of drinking tea, in which the drinker places a sugar cube or bit of preserves in the front of his mouth and sips the tea through the sugar or preserves?

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Interesting idea, Sam, especially considering the name. Tell me more.
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Erik Ellestad
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#34 slkinsey

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 09:47 AM

Russian tea has a particular tradition (that I've largely picked up from reading Dostoyevski) . An extra-strong tea is brewed and then diluted with hot water from a samovar for service. It is quite common to float a slice of lemon on top of the tea. And it was quite traditional to hold a sugar cube (not compressed granulated sugar, but a broken-off lump of loaf sugar) between the teeth or a bit of preserves in the front of the mouth, thus sipping the tea through the sugar or preserves.

Some info here: http://teatips.ru/en...wArticle&id=301
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#35 Wild Bill Turkey

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Posted 27 April 2009 - 01:19 PM

I have to try the Night cap. I know you said the Cointreau was an "accident", but since the word here seems to be that Grand Marnier upgrades curaçao as Cointreau upgrades triple sec, do you think you would have used Grand Marnier had your hands not taken over? Brandy based liqueur in a brandy drink?

#36 eje

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 10:14 AM

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Nine-Pick Cocktail.

2/3 Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Sirene Absinthe Verte)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Hayman’s Old Tom Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (Angostura)
1 Dash Syrup.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This name doesn’t really make sense until you scan the next page…

Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up Cocktail
2/3 Pernod Absinthe.
1/3 Gin.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Bitters.
1 Dash Gomme Syrup.
Shake well, strain into medium size wine-glass, and fill balance with soda water.


So the “Nine-Pick” is a shortened version of the “Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up”! I can just imagine some business man saying, “You know I’d like that Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up, but I don’t have time for a long drink. Can you leave out the soda?” Then some smart aleck bartender handing him the cocktail and telling him that without the soda, it’s only a “Nine-Pick”.

With a generous dash of syrup and a nice long, vigorous shake, this is actually not bad. Well, if you like Absinthe, obviously. I chose to use the Hayman’s because it was handy and seemed like it would be interesting, especially since the other 2/3 of the drink was already high test. Turned out to be a good choice with the citrus flavors of the Sirene and Hayman’s complementing each other nicely.

I am kind of cheating here using actual Absinthe. By 1920 Absinthe was banned in most countries, so it is far more likely that this cocktail would be made with Pernod’s newly available Wormwood free product*.

*From this Coctkailtimes article: Absinthe was banned in 1910 in the Switzerland, 1912 in the US, and 1914 in France. In 1920, France again allowed the production of anise flavored drinks. Pernod’s new Wormwood free formulation was one of the first out of the gate.

Edited by eje, 29 April 2009 - 10:16 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#37 Wild Bill Turkey

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 12:35 PM

That would also explain why it feels balanced with a generous pour of syrup and sweetened gin. The Pernod pastis is syrup-sweet in comparison to absinthe.

#38 eje

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 08:32 AM

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Nineteen Cocktail.

1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
1/6 Dry Gin. (1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
1/6 Kirsch. (1/2 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
2/3 French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Original Dry*)
4 Dashes Syrup. (1 tsp. Rich Simple Syrup)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

Posted Image

Noilly Prat recently redesigned the bottles for their Sweet and Dry Vermouths. Along with the redesign of the bottles, they discontinued a formula of their Dry Vermouth which they had only been selling in America, standardizing on the “Original French Dry” which has been sold in the rest of the world for all this time.

To explain, some time in the 1960s, as Martinis were getting drier and drier, Noilly Prat launched a new forumula of their Dry Vermouth exclusively for the US.

This is the text of an ad from 1964, turned up by Mr. David Wondrich:

VERY VERY PALE
    So pale that new Noilly Prat French Vermouth is virtually invisible in your gin or vodka. Extra pale and extra dry for today’s correct Martini. DON’T STIR WITHOUT NOILLY PRAT.


Well, as you can see from the picture of the drink above, Noilly Dry is invisible no longer! Most Martinis with more than a splash of vermouth, will now take on a distinct amber hue from the darker color of the Noilly Dry Vermouth.

The difference in the two versions that were sold was primarily a larger percentage of aged wine in the “Original French Dry”.

As far as taste goes, doing a side by side of the two Noilly, there is a stronger sherry like character in the “new” formula and slightly more pronounced herbal/floral flavor.

A lot of people have gotten up in arms about this, Feeling Noilly has ruined their Martinis forever.

From my perspective, however, we’re probably getting something closer to what Noilly Prat Vermouth would have tasted like in the early part of the 20th Century. In addition we’re getting extra vermouth flavor.

How could that be a bad thing?

For example, I tried making this cocktail with the lighter American Noilly and again with Dolin Dry. I found that I preferred the Original French Dry in this cocktail to either of the other two Dry Vermouths.

While there are other cocktails where I prefer the Dolin Dry, Dry Martinis for example, in more complex or vermouth forward cocktails, the Noilly Prat can bring a bit more interest to the drink.

In regards, the Nineteen Cocktail, it is a light cocktail along the lines of the Chrysanthemum. A good before dinner drink which might even complement an appetizer without getting you totally blitzed on an empty stomach. Or a nice civilized drink to get you back on an even keel after a few more potent potables.

*Noilly Original Dry was received from a marketing firm promoting its launch.

Edited by eje, 01 May 2009 - 08:33 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#39 eje

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 06:52 PM

Posted Image

Nineteen-Twenty Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Groseille Syrup. (1 teaspoon Brizard Creme de Cassis)
1/6 Pernod Kirsch. (1/2 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
1/6 Crystal Gin. (1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
2/3 French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Luxardo Cherry.)

Obviously very similar to the preceding “Nineteen Cocktail”. The only real difference being using the Groseille (aka Red Currant) Syrup as a sweetener instead of plain syrup. I’m substituting the Brizard Cassis for the Groseille. If you didn’t have that around, Grenadine would likely be your next best choice.

I enjoyed both of these light, low alcohol cocktails, but to be honest I kind of preferred the cleaner flavor of the Nineteen to the the Nineteen-Twenty.
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#40 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:12 PM

Posted Image

Nineteen-Twenty Cocktail

1 Teaspoonful Groseille Syrup. (1 teaspoon Brizard Creme de Cassis)
1/6 Pernod Kirsch. (1/2 oz Clear Creek Kirsch)
1/6 Crystal Gin. (1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
2/3 French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Luxardo Cherry.)

Obviously very similar to the preceding “Nineteen Cocktail”. The only real difference being using the Groseille (aka Red Currant) Syrup as a sweetener instead of plain syrup. I’m substituting the Brizard Cassis for the Groseille. If you didn’t have that around, Grenadine would likely be your next best choice.

I enjoyed both of these light, low alcohol cocktails, but to be honest I kind of preferred the cleaner flavor of the Nineteen to the the Nineteen-Twenty.

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Having made some redcurrant syrup from a Perfect Puree sample, I would say that grenadine is probably a closer approximation than Creme de Cassis. Shame that Redcurrant isn't a more popular/common flavor in the States, it really has a unique flavor dimension than grenadine or raspberry syrup.
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#41 eje

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 08:13 AM

Posted Image

Nineteen-Twenty Pick-Me-Up Cocktail

2/3 Pernod Absinthe. (1 1/2 oz Henri Bardouin Pastis)
1/3 Gin. (3/4 oz Beefeater’s Gin)
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
1 Dash Orange Bitters. (1 dash Angostura Orange Bitters)
1 Dash Gomme Syrup. (1/3 tsp. Rich Simple Syrup)

Shake well, strain into medium size wine-glass, and fill balance with soda water.

We’ve discussed “Absinthe” quite a bit previously, most recently on the Nine Pick and Monkey Gland Cocktails.

The question here is, “What would this cocktail have been made with? True Absinthe or a Wormwood free substitute like Pernod or Ricard?”

As we noted before, Absinthe was banned in most countries between 1910 and 1915. Therefore, in pretty much any cocktail recipe calling for “Absinthe” and dating from 1920 through to 2006, the author really means Pernod or Ricard.

Fortunately, in the case of this cocktail it is an easy call. The name suggests it is from 1920 and it uses the term “Pernod Absinthe” in the recipe. 1920 was the year France once again allowed anise flavored liqueurs to be manufactured and sold. Pernod et fils was one of the first out of the gate with a wormwood-free reformulation of its Absinthe.

So, yeah, this recipe should be made with a Wormwood-free anise flavored liqueur.

I’m using Henri Bardouin Pastis, which is one of my favorite Wormwood-free Anise flavored beverages. It’s a bit less sweet and more complex than Pernod, Herbsaint, or Ricard. The only downside to using Bardouin Pastis in cocktails is that some of the flavoring oils have a tendency to drop out of solution when it is shaken with ice and chilled rapidly. It’s still tasty, but the oils float to the top and form an ugly white film.

The big difference between Absinthe and most of the Wormwood-free substitutes, aside from the lack of Artemesia absinthium in the botanicals, is the presence of sugar in the product.

When making an Absinthe drip, most people add at least some sugar. When Pernod et fils developed their new products post-ban, it seems like they made a conscious decision to make the Absinthe ritual simpler. They added sugar to the products in the bottle. So instead of the whole dripping water over sugar into the Absinthe, all you had to do was add water.

You can make this cocktail with Absinthe or with a Wormwood-free substitute. Simply take into consideration the lack of sugar in the Absinthe and go a bit heavier on the Sugar Syrup.

For some reason, maybe it’s the large portion of Absinthe, someone inevitably orders one of these every time we do Savoy Cocktail Book night at Alembic Bar. It’s hard to mind too much, as the soda sort of mitigates the large portion of spirits. Anyway, if you like Absinthe, it’s actually quite a pleasant drink to sip on a hot day.
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#42 eje

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 09:27 AM

Posted Image

Nose-Dive Cocktail


Take one hooker of Gin (Beefeater’s), place in it an olive (Picholine Olive), then deposit the glass carefully in the bottom of an ordinary tumbler. Fill the said tumbler with Water, Ginger Ale, or What Have You (Fever Tree Bitter Lemon), until almost to the top of the small glass, then down the whole thing quickly. That is, everything but the small glass.


Note: This Cocktail is very among pilots on American Flying Fields.


Judge Junior tells us the cocktail was, “Contributed by “Billy” from Wheeler field, Hawaii. This is the aviator’s favorite—let’s go.”

A “hooker”, as far as I can tell, refers more to a type of glass than an actual measure. My guess is it is probably the type of small shot glass that is so common in antique and second hand stores. In any case, it has to fit inside an “ordinary tumbler”.

Every once in a while you hear some joker banging on about “The Golden Age of Cocktails” or some such. Some mythic time when everyone drank civilly and comported themselves with dignity for the entire course of the evening.

The fact of the matter is, drinking, for various reasons, is sometimes about getting drunk, whether it is Vodka and Red Bull in 2009, a tequila slammer in 1990, or a Nose Dive Cocktail in 1930.

Really enjoying this Fever Tree Bitter Lemon, by the way. Gin and Bitter Lemon is a great combo.

Edited by eje, 07 May 2009 - 09:27 AM.

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#43 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 07 May 2009 - 01:21 PM

Judge Junior tells us the cocktail was, “Contributed by “Billy” from Wheeler field, Hawaii. This is the aviator’s favorite—let’s go.”


View Post


Wikipedia tells us that no less an aviator than Billy Mitchell was stationed in Hawaii around 1924-25. I wonder if there is a connection.

While (sort of) on the subject of Judge Jr., does anyone know anything about who this guy was and how he came by so many sketchy drink recipes?
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#44 eje

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 08:30 AM

Posted Image

Odd McIntyre Cocktail.

1/4 Glass Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Underhill Kina Clone)
1/4 Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cognac)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudongon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Third time we’ve made this exact cocktail. Previously we’ve known it as the “Frank Sullivan” and “Hoop La!“. It still is a Corpse Reviver No. 2, with Brandy instead of Gin, and no Absinthe.

It is also still an enjoyable, if not amazing, cocktail.

To quote from the Wikipedia:

Oscar Odd McIntyre (February 18, 1884, Plattsburg, Missouri - February 14, 1938, New York City, New York) was a famed New York newspaper columnist of the 1920s and 1930s. The Washington Post once described his column as “the letter from New York read by millions because it never lost the human, homefolk flavor of a letter from a friend.”

For a quarter of a century, his daily column, “New York Day by Day,” was published in more than 500 newspapers.




As regards cocktails, Mr. McIntyre was one of the founding members, along with Harry McElhone, of the I.B.F. or International Bar Flies, an organization reputedly started as a press stunt at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris some time around Christmas of 1924. See the Mud Puddle books edition of Harry and Wynn’s “Barflies and Cocktails” for more information regarding that institution.

Edited by eje, 09 May 2009 - 08:31 AM.

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#45 bostonapothecary

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:23 AM

1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Underhill Kina Clone)


interesting clone recipe. why was the wine heated in the beginning if the sugar could just be stirred in?

i think those orange products are about blending different types of peels to create a particular shade of orange-orientated fruit. green, sweet, & seville. finding something seductive can probably be made easier by tracking down an interesting moscat style wine rather than mastering the orange. producers probably have to change their tricks and rely more on the peels when they scale up immensely. they use ingenuity to make flavors found only in rare dessert wines affordable. for us its probably just cheaper to slightly augment the rare dessert wine.

great wine picks to consider in a blend would be capanna's moscadello de montalcino which is epic moscat with far more orangey fruit character than the typical melon.

another cool dessert wine that made me think of such a project is donnafugata's passito di panteleria. a small amount in the blend would be killer.
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#46 eje

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 09:56 AM

1/4 Glass Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Underhill Kina Clone)
1/4 Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cognac)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudongon Cognac)


Oops, that should be:

1/4 Glass Lemon Juice. (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Underhill Kina Clone)
1/4 Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Glass Brandy. (3/4 oz Dudongon Cognac)
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#47 eje

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 11:00 AM

interesting clone recipe.  why was the wine heated in the beginning if the sugar could just be stirred in?
[...]

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Along with dissolving the sugar, I wanted to get better expression of the spices. Many of these, I have found, especially cinnamon, do not express themselves particularly well through simple infusion.

To be honest, I don't really find I have as much of a feel for aromatizing wine, as I do for liqueur and syrup making. I feel like I'm still making crayon drawings or caricatures of the commercial products.

I'm kind of getting to the point where I almost don't see much benefit of even trying to do it, as the commercial products are so much superior.
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#48 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 09 May 2009 - 11:38 AM

1/4 Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Underhill Kina Clone)


interesting clone recipe. why was the wine heated in the beginning if the sugar could just be stirred in?

i think those orange products are about blending different types of peels to create a particular shade of orange-orientated fruit. green, sweet, & seville. finding something seductive can probably be made easier by tracking down an interesting moscat style wine rather than mastering the orange. producers probably have to change their tricks and rely more on the peels when they scale up immensely. they use ingenuity to make flavors found only in rare dessert wines affordable. for us its probably just cheaper to slightly augment the rare dessert wine.

great wine picks to consider in a blend would be capanna's moscadello de montalcino which is epic moscat with far more orangey fruit character than the typical melon.

another cool dessert wine that made me think of such a project is donnafugata's passito di panteleria. a small amount in the blend would be killer.

View Post


As an aperitif from Bordeaux, shouldn't the wine base be a Sauv Blanc/Semillon blend and the fortifying spirit be Armagnac? The stuff sort of retains a trace of Semillon varietal character, I think.
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#49 eje

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 09:05 AM

Posted Image

Oh Henry! Cocktail

1/3 Benedictine. (1 oz Benedictine)
1/3 Whisky. (3/4 oz Famous Grouse, 1/4 oz Jon Mark and Robbo Smokey Peaty One)
1/3 Ginger Ale. (1 oz Bundaberg Ginger Beer)

Stir well and serve.

This cocktail comes from Judge Jr.’s Prohibition era tome, “Here’s How.” In that book the recipe is given as: “1 jigger of Benedictine; 1 jigger of Scotch; 2 jiggers of ginger ale,” which seems a bit more sensible. Judge Jr. also notes this cocktail was, “Originated by Henry Oretel and believe us Henry knows his liquids!” I can dig up no information on Mr. Oretel.

While tasty, this is way too sweet for me. I think even with 2 parts ginger beer to 1 part Scotch and Benedictine. If I had to do it over, I would go with: 1/2 oz Benedictine, 1 1/2 oz Scotch. Build over ice and top up with Ginger Beer.
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#50 eje

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 08:04 AM

Posted Image

Old Etonian Cocktail

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Bitters)
2 Dashes Crème de Noyau. (2/3 barspoon Rowley Noyau)
1/2 London Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore Distiller’s No. 11)
1/2 Kina Lillet. (1 1/2 oz Homemade Lillet Clone)

Shake will and strain into cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

Lot of homemade shit in this one, eh?

Posted Image

Now you know when you get liqueur in a bottle as confidence inspiring as the above, you are in for a treat.

Matt Rowley, being the fearless man that he is, made a batch of Noyau earlier this year: If I Had a Hammer. The minute after I read his post, I had an email out to Rowley asking if he was interested in a trade of Noyau for Nocino. He was amenable and soon a bottle of Noyau appeared in the mail.

Zyklon B or no, it is tasty stuff. If you don’t have an enterprising friend like Rowley, the usual substitution of Amaretto will likely be fine.

The cocktail is one of the more pleasing in recent memory. The bitter almond and cherry-like flavor of the Noyau combines quite well with the slightly sweet oranginess of the Kina Lillet Clone. I can only imagine it would be tastier with Cocchi Americano.

Edited by eje, 13 May 2009 - 08:05 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#51 Splificator

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 09:15 AM

While (sort of) on the subject of Judge Jr., does anyone know anything about who this guy was and how he came by so many sketchy drink recipes?

"Judge, Jr." was the nom-de-plume for Norman Anthony, editor in chief of Judge magazine, the leading American humor magazine of the day (and where Harold Ross worked before founding the New Yorker). Since he--whether alone or, as is more likely, with the assistence of his editorial staff, interns, friends and readers--compiled the book here in America during Prohibition, he had to make do with what he could get, both in terms of ingredients and suggestions for mixing them. His first book is, however, the first place the French 75 appears in print, so it's not a total wash.
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#52 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 09:23 AM

While (sort of) on the subject of Judge Jr., does anyone know anything about who this guy was and how he came by so many sketchy drink recipes?

"Judge, Jr." was the nom-de-plume for Norman Anthony, editor in chief of Judge magazine, the leading American humor magazine of the day (and where Harold Ross worked before founding the New Yorker). Since he--whether alone or, as is more likely, with the assistence of his editorial staff, interns, friends and readers--compiled the book here in America during Prohibition, he had to make do with what he could get, both in terms of ingredients and suggestions for mixing them. His first book is, however, the first place the French 75 appears in print, so it's not a total wash.

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Very interesting info, thanks. I guess it took a bit of gumption to publish something like this in the throes of Prohibition. It gets mentioned a fair bit nowadays considering the typical quality of the recipes but how popular was it in it's day? Was it sort of take what you can get atmosphere in the readership as in the authorship?
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#53 eje

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 04:54 PM

I do kind of dread the Judge Jr. drinks.

Almost none of them are any good without serious interpolation. Doesn't help that many of them seem to have gained typos when transcribed for the Savoy Cocktail Book. Many of them do contain the tasty kernel of a drink, however. The Applejack Rabbit for example and maybe even the Oh Henry! above. I don't even mind the Barbary Coast, weird prohibition Mai Tai that it is.

It does seem to indicate, however, that the cocktails folks were drinking in the US during prohibition were seriously not that tasty.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#54 haresfur

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Posted 13 May 2009 - 06:05 PM

Oh Henry! Cocktail

1/3 Benedictine. (1 oz Benedictine)
1/3 Whisky. (3/4 oz Famous Grouse, 1/4 oz Jon Mark and Robbo Smokey Peaty One)
1/3 Ginger Ale. (1 oz Bundaberg Ginger Beer)

Stir well and serve.

This cocktail comes from Judge Jr.’s Prohibition era tome, “Here’s How.” In that book the recipe is given as: “1 jigger of Benedictine; 1 jigger of Scotch; 2 jiggers of ginger ale,” which seems a bit more sensible. Judge Jr. also notes this cocktail was, “Originated by Henry Oretel and believe us Henry knows his liquids!” I can dig up no information on Mr. Oretel.

While tasty, this is way too sweet for me. I think even with 2 parts ginger beer to 1 part Scotch and Benedictine. If I had to do it over, I would go with: 1/2 oz Benedictine, 1 1/2 oz Scotch. Build over ice and top up with Ginger Beer.

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I tried this with your proportions and I'm not so sure. Tried adding a splash more Benedictine - that wasn't it. Tried a bit more ginger beer - not it either. Threw in some Regan's orange bitters - a bit more interesting. From the way different flavors came and went from the forefront, maybe it's just another "twitchy" scotch cocktail to balance.
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#55 eje

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 08:16 AM

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Old Fashioned Cocktail.

1 Lump Sugar.
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky.

Crush sugar and bitters together, add lump of ice, decorate with twist of lemon peel and slice of orange using medium size glass, and stir well. This Cocktail can be made with Brandy, Gin, Rum, etc., instead of Rye Whisky.

Is there anything really left to say about Old-Fashioneds?

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Well, one thing I have noticed is that graduates of the American Bartending School are often a bit confused (youtube link) about which end of the muddler goes into the cocktail and which end they should be holding.

Let’s be clear, in the photo above, grasp the top rounded end.

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The flat end of the muddler goes into the cocktail to crush your sugar, bitters and what have you.

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Also, if you buy a varnished muddler, it’s best to sand the varnish off and soak it in mineral oil. If you don’t, flakes of varnish will eventually end up in the cocktails. Varnish is never an appropriate garnish. Now the above muddler is OK for things like Juleps and Old-Fashioned which are built in normal size glassware. For those drinks which are muddled in pint glasses, and the like, you might want to think of something with a bit more heft.

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For example you might talk to Chris Gallagher and get yourself one of his extremely attractive PUG! Muddlers. The one above is made from Mexican Rosewood. Also, the slanted top end of pug muddlers makes them nearly impossible to hold the wrong way. Or drop a note to David Nepove, aka Mister Mojito, who also sells quite an assortment of muddlers and other bar equipment.

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Which version did I make this time, with all those options, “Brandy, Gin, Rum, etc.”? Well, I’m supporting the home team, of course!

Genevieve Old-Fashioned.

1 lump Demerara Sugar.
2 dashes Angostura Bitters.
2 oz Anchor Genevieve Genever Style Gin.

In a medium size heavy bottomed glass, with a muddler, crush sugar and bitters together with a splash of water. Add Genevieve and stir to combine. Add ice and stir well. Decorate with twist of lemon peel, a slice of orange, and serve.

Edited by eje, 15 May 2009 - 08:19 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#56 brinza

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 09:27 AM


While tasty, this is way too sweet for me. I think even with 2 parts ginger beer to 1 part Scotch and Benedictine. If I had to do it over, I would go with: 1/2 oz Benedictine, 1 1/2 oz Scotch. Build over ice and top up with Ginger Beer.

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I tried this with your proportions and I'm not so sure. Tried adding a splash more Benedictine - that wasn't it. Tried a bit more ginger beer - not it either. Threw in some Regan's orange bitters - a bit more interesting. From the way different flavors came and went from the forefront, maybe it's just another "twitchy" scotch cocktail to balance.

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While I realize it says 'whisky' not 'whiskey,' (and as much as I love the challenge of making cocktails with Scotch), for some reason I usually make this with bourbon or rye. I find that works quite well.
Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

#57 eje

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Posted 15 May 2009 - 09:32 AM

While I realize it says 'whisky' not 'whiskey,' (and as much as I love the challenge of making cocktails with Scotch), for some reason I usually make this with bourbon or rye.  I find that works quite well.

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The Savoy Cocktail Book uses the spelling "whisky" for all types of whisky in all cocktails.

However, in what we suspect is the source for this recipe, Judge Jr.'s prohibition era book, "Here's How!" he specifies Scotch for the OH Henry!.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#58 eje

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Posted 17 May 2009 - 08:55 AM

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“Old Pal” Cocktail

1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Original Formula Dry)
1/3 Campari. (1 oz Campari)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This “Old Pal” comes from the 1922 edition of “Harry’s ABC of Cocktails”. As far as I can tell, it appears to be one of the earliest recipes in print, at least in English, calling for Campari.

It doesn’t quite make sense to me, however, with the French Vermouth and Rye. Really you just end up with very little else balancing out the flavors of the Campari and Rye Whiskey.

By McElhone’s 1927 “Barflies and Cocktails“, the “Old Pal” had disappeared in favor of the Boulevardier*, aka the Bourbon Negroni. A much more sensible beverage, if you ask me.

*If you can’t find the Boulevardier initially, it’s no wonder. Check the “Cocktails Round Town” section at the back of the book. “Now is the time for all good Barflies to come to the aid of the party, since Erskinne Gwynne crashed in with his Boulevardier Cocktail: 1/3 Campari, 1/3 Italian Vermouth, 1/3 Bourbon Whisky.”
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#59 J_Ozzy

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Posted 18 May 2009 - 09:01 PM

Canadian Club is not nearly as assertive as Sazerac Rye.
I'd hazard that the canadian whisky and the vermouth work in concert to dampen the Campari's excesses in the original, rather than compete with it.

#60 eje

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 08:54 AM

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Olivette Cocktail

2 Dashes Syrup. (Scant barspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)
3 Dashes Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)
2/3 Glass Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass with olive and squeeze lemon peel on top.

More or less just an Improved or Fancy Plymouth Gin Cocktail, this is some pretty serious business. Lesser men need not apply.

If you have an appreciation for slightly adulterated straight spirits, on the other hand, this is not bad at all. Do give it a nice long stir, however, make it small, and drink it while it is very cold.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA