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Dinner! 2013 (Part 2)


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#481 Prawncrackers

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 12:04 PM

Prawncrackers, it is pure genius to use Ox cheek in rendang. I am so going to steal that idea! Beautiful food as always. 

 

Thanks Keith, i'm going to claim that it is actually my original idea to steal from!  The eureka moment happened in this cheeky thread back in 2009.

 

Cheeks are great eating, I had some pigs cheeks in the freezer and made a mole poblano sauce to go with them today. Delicious but impossible to photo nicely:

 

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Grilling season is definitely here and I know you good people like to see a nice steak.  As a plus the asparagus season as also started in the UK so i grilled some of those too. 

 

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Served over Japanese rice with miso aubergine and that same sesame miso sauce from my last post (a real favourite).  Best thing was the steak only £6.50 from my local supermarket!  Reduced price as it had been on the counter for a week apparently.  Whodya thunk aged beef costing less, that's supermarket logic for you.  I aged it another 8 days in my fridge before cooking it.  I think £ for lb ('scuse the pun) it was the best steak I've ever eaten.  Really flavourful and tender.

 


Edited by Prawncrackers, 24 April 2013 - 12:34 PM.


#482 Jason Perlow

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 03:55 PM

Tonight, "Florida-Style" Banh-Mi Sandwiches.

 

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These are the BBQ smoked, bacon-wrapped chicken/pork meatballs made over the weekend (shown upthread) on whole wheat hoagie rolls, with a Sriracha-lime mayo, pickled onions, fresh chopped pineapple, cilantro and mint, and ripe jalapenos.


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#483 Okanagancook

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 04:53 PM

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Double injected roast chicken, Mk. 3 (roast chicken injected with roast chicken jus). This time I followed the Modernist Cuisine at Home cooking technique - i.e. slow roast to 60C, then rest 45m, then brown the skin under the broiler. Result: my oven cooks the chicken in half the time specified in the book, but broils the chicken in double the time without satisfactory uniform browning (note slight burning).

I had the same trouble getting a good uniform browning. The meat was lovely and moist using the slow cook method. My brother made it again and cranked his oven up to as high as it would go and got a nice brown but he said it made one heck of a mess in the oven. I will be doing a slow cooked bird again and finishing it off in the BGE to get a nice crispy skin.

#484 C. sapidus

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:52 PM

I guess if I want good char siu, I’m just going to have to get someone to give me a good recipe and make it from scratch (hint-hint :wink: ). 

PM sent  :smile:

 

Last night our Russian friends stopped by and taught Mrs. C to make blini, so we had a classic culture-clash meal: spicy Thai beef with nahm phrik pao and fried shallots, wrapped up in Russian blini. Quite good, actually, but no pics.

 

Beef stir-fried with cauliflower – Flank steak, sliced thinly and marinated with fish sauce, soy sauce, black pepper, sugar, and cornstarch. Onions, garlic, and parboiled cauliflower. Cilantro after the picture. The flank steak turned out meltingly tender.

 

Jasmine rice, green salad, and Mrs. C’s delicious salad dressing with pineapple and balsamic vinegar. Warm Costco strawberry-rhubarb crisp for dessert.

 

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#485 Kim Shook

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:12 PM

basquecook - I somehow missed commenting on that pork.  That looks so amazing!  My mom was looking over my shoulder and caught sight of it and said, “WHAT is that?  It’s gorgeous!”. 

 

Soba – I think you are probably right!  I want to try Chinese sausage – it is on my shopping list for the next time we go by the Asian market.

 

Prawn – Lobster noodles.  Just the name sounds fantastic.

 

Bruce – back atcha!  Thanks!

 

Monday night Mr. Kim finally redeemed his Father’s day coupon from last June – a dry aged steak dinner with all the trimmings.  Pre-dinner munchies included a cheese selection along with white fig preserves (homemade – a gift from a friend), sour cherry preserves and Daelia’s hazelnut w/ fig biscuits for cheese:

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The cheeses were (from 12 o’clock) Roquefort Société Bee, Mitica Capricho de Cabra w. fine herbs, les 3 comtois aged mimolette, Mitica fresco asiago:

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Salad:

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The steak covered one entire plate:

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The sauce was a dried morel and wine sauce that I came up with.  I had some of James Peterson’s meat glaze in the freezer and added that and a little salt and pepper. Mr. Kim said it was one of the best things he’s ever eaten. 

 

The baked potato and asparagus had to go on another dinner plate:

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Swaddled bread:

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:laugh:

 

Dessert was just some minis that we got at WF:

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Éclair, turtle cheesecake, fruit tart and cannoli.  The fruit tart and the cannoli were really good.  The others were very ordinary.  Why does it seem so hard for bakeries and restaurants to get eclairs right?  Crème pâtissière is NOT that hard to make and choux pastry is dead easy.  And so many places put a thick layer of buttercream icing on top instead of a glaze.  I just don’t get it.

 

Last night my mother was over for dinner.  Salad and James Briscione’s sherry shrimp and grits:

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We love these shrimp. I did the grits in the slow cooker – I love this method and don’t think I’ll ever do them stove top again.



#486 Steve Irby

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:18 PM

Great posts.  Prawncrackers that rib-eye is ridiculous looking.  The marbling on that steak is what cardiologist call job security.  Jason Perlow - beautiful job on wrapping those meatballs.  Drop off a batch and I'll certify the "Florida Style" appellation.

 

Fresh corn and mushroom chowder.  Finished with homemade tasso brunoise, aleppo pepper and spinach (not quite) chiffonade.

 

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#487 TinaYuan

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:20 PM

Prawncrackers, absolutely beautiful and delicious dishes! Would you mind telling me about that sesame miso sauce? I searched your posts but didn't find it. Thanks!

 

Kim, you and Mr Kim really have a delicious life!!!


Edited by TinaYuan, 24 April 2013 - 07:27 PM.

Life is beautiful.

#488 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:22 PM

I was working again this evening, so grabbed a few small meals along the way, including:

 

Green beans, tomatoes, olive oil and lemon

Miso soup

Cooked muesli, fruit, coconut yogurt, sultanas soaked in tea

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Plantes Vertes, 24 April 2013 - 07:43 PM.


#489 patrickamory

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:16 PM

Kim mimolette = wonderful cheese. De Gaulle's favorite, if I remember correctly.

 

Prawncrackers beautiful steak, really only £6.50?!



#490 Prawncrackers

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 01:22 AM

Prawncrackers beautiful steak, really only £6.50?!


It was Ridonkulously cheap! Keeping my eyes open for those reduced priced Hereford rib roasts at Waitrose on a Tuesday afternoon.

Prawncrackers, absolutely beautiful and delicious dishes! Would you mind telling me about that sesame miso sauce? I searched your posts but didn't find it. Thanks!!


Of course I've been having it with grilled pork chops and beef. I retro-engineered it from one I had in a steak restaurant in Fukuoka. It should be mixed with freshly ground toasted sesame before dipping your meat into it. In the restaurant we each had a small bowl with grooves etched into it called a suribachi. The sesame seeds are ground in this before the sauce is added. The combination of the sweet deeply savoury and deep nuttiness of the sesame is simply sublime:

200ml ichiban dashi made from katsuobushi and kombu
100g brown miso
120g mirin
75g sugar
50g rice wine vinegar
Simmer the above for 15 minutes then add a teaspoon of finely grated ginger and simmer for another 5 minutes. Take off the heat and stir in one tablespoon of yuzu juice (or a mixture of lime and Seville orange). The sauce will keep for a while in the fridge.

#491 rotuts

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 05:01 AM

Jason Perlow

 

great idea on those balls.  would the balls freeze well, then thaw and torch a little for future sandwiches?



#492 Jason Perlow

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 07:22 AM

Jason Perlow

 

great idea on those balls.  would the balls freeze well, then thaw and torch a little for future sandwiches?

 

Absolutely.


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#493 Ranz

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 12:38 PM

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Pork ribs, sous vide, finished with BBQ sauce from MC, think it was Lexington style.



#494 mm84321

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 03:58 PM

Pigeon with cumin

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#495 judiu

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 04:36 PM

Kim, I looked in your cook book, I googled the chef and I STILL can 't find that recipe! Grrrr! Help, please; they look so good!
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

#496 TinaYuan

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 05:24 PM

Prawncrackers, thank you. Definitely grill some meat this weekend!

mm84321, your dish is too beautiful to eat!

 

I tried to make potato rosti today. Since I don't have mandoline, it's really painful to cut those potatoes. Five potatoes, one hour.....

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Unfortunately, I didn't dry potatoes completely. It turns out only a thin layer of crispy, absolutely I want more. Moreover, my stainless steel pan is sticky. It's a total disaster to get it out of the pan.

 

In all, it's not successful. Hope next time it will be better~

Garnished with lemon yogurt and cilantro,

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One more thing, could somebody help me with a cutting question? 

Why are things always sticky to knife when I cut them, like potato chips, tofu. I have to push them away almost after each cut. Any solution to this problem? Or is there something wrong with my way to cut food? Thanks!


Life is beautiful.

#497 Keith_W

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 05:54 PM

Tina, you did very well even with your knife problems! Those are very nice juliennes.

Why food sticks to your knife - this is because the surface tension of water and vacuum makes the food stick to your knife. To get around this, either use a thinner knife (like a Japanese sushi knife) or get a knife with scallops near the cutting edge (like a Santoku knife). The scallops introduce air and stops the food from sticking. I wonder if you can oil the knife (though I have never tried it).

I have tried making that rosti as well. In my case I had all the equipment needed - non-stick pan, mandolin, etc. But I couldn't get mine to flip without breaking the rosti. After a few failed attempts, I now crack one egg white into a bowl, whisk it, then add it to the mixture - I found that it works perfectly with no noticable difference in taste.

Edited by Keith_W, 25 April 2013 - 05:55 PM.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#498 mm84321

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 06:30 PM

mm84321, your dish is too beautiful to eat!

 

Thanks, Tina. Great looking julienne. 



#499 TinaYuan

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 06:37 PM

Keith, thank you very much! Your explanation is really helpful. My knife is victorinox 8 inch chef's knife. I don't know if this type of chef's knife all have the same thickness. I will shop for some thinner knife, as you say. 

 

Moreover, I did oil the knife but it didn't work. I also wipe the wet knife but it didn't work either. 

 

My pan is crazily sticky. I also don't have confidence in flipping. So I use two pans to do the flip.... Your solution is great! I will try it next time. 


Life is beautiful.

#500 dcarch

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 07:51 PM

Tina, I am not sure if there is a way to make wet food not stick to the blade, certainly not a thinner blade.

 

When two smooth surfaces are closely put together with a very thin layer of water in between, there will be about 14 lbs per sq. inch of atmospheric pressure pushing them together.

 

Dimpled blades (granton edge) may help a little for thick cuts, but not much for thin cuts.

 

dcarch



#501 patrickamory

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 07:53 PM

Tart garlic chicken from Naomi Duguid's new Burmese book. This is rapidly becoming a regular dish around here.

 

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Edited by patrickamory, 25 April 2013 - 07:56 PM.


#502 bague25

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 12:41 AM

Patrickamory this looks so good that I'm tempted to do it this evening for dinner :-)



#503 Keith_W

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 04:37 AM

Keith, thank you very much! Your explanation is really helpful. My knife is victorinox 8 inch chef's knife. I don't know if this type of chef's knife all have the same thickness. I will shop for some thinner knife, as you say.

Tina, it is difficult to communicate what I mean in words! What I meant was the WIDTH of the knife and not the actual thinness. I don't know if knives have x, y, and z dimensions but what I meant was a knife which was not too wide. Sorry for the confusion.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#504 TinaYuan

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:12 AM

dcarch, thank you very much. I misunderstood what keith meant before. I think I now got it.

Keith, thanks. To make sure I understand this time, do you mean the width I draw below?

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Life is beautiful.

#505 Keith_W

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:30 AM

No Tina that's the length ... the width is the dimension which is not the length and not the thickness! Err, a cleaver is a "wide" knife, while a boning knife is a "thin" knife ... if that makes sense.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#506 SobaAddict70

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:47 AM

Keith, thank you very much! Your explanation is really helpful. My knife is victorinox 8 inch chef's knife. I don't know if this type of chef's knife all have the same thickness. I will shop for some thinner knife, as you say. 

 

Moreover, I did oil the knife but it didn't work. I also wipe the wet knife but it didn't work either. 

 

My pan is crazily sticky. I also don't have confidence in flipping. So I use two pans to do the flip.... Your solution is great! I will try it next time. 

 

for something like rosti, you can also invert a plate on top of the rosti, then flip and slide the rosti onto the pan that way.  less mess. 



#507 sigma

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:47 AM

Actually Keith, that is height.



#508 dcarch

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:12 AM

Tina, I think what Keith is trying to clarify is the dimension between the cutting edge and the spine (top edge).

 

BTW, do not get one of those Teflon coated knives either. Food sticking just the same.

 

I like the fact that food sticks to the blade. Check out how Martin Yang's cutting techniques take advantage of that.

 

dcarch


Edited by dcarch, 26 April 2013 - 07:13 AM.


#509 TinaYuan

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 10:38 AM

Keith, this time I really understand. There is only one dimension left.... :biggrin:

 

SobaAddict70, it's a great method. I just saw it in cook's illustrated this morning.

 

dcarch, I am considering a Chinese chef's knife, which looks like a cleaver. Martin Yan's demonstration is really helpful. Thank you so much!


Edited by TinaYuan, 26 April 2013 - 10:42 AM.

Life is beautiful.

#510 Morkai

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 11:39 AM

Served over Japanese rice with miso aubergine and that same sesame miso sauce from my last post (a real favourite).  

 

Now you have me curious. That sauce looks incredible!