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Dinner! 2013 (Part 2)


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#1 dcarch

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:43 AM

[Moderator note: Well, that was quick! This topic became too large for our servers to handle, so we've divided it up; the earlier part of the discussion is here: Dinner! 2013 (Part 1)]

 

 

More than 150 amazing dishes have been posted since I last posted!

 

Here are a few my recent ones.

 

dcarch

Smoked pork chops

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Mussels on mini eggplants
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Sous Vided Chicken Marsala with crispy skin, mini eggplants, bok choy, on orzo
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#2 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:01 PM

nice dcarch. 

 

I had to look twice to "get" the mussels.  clever. 



#3 Baselerd

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:04 PM

Nice plating on those pork chops - what are those stems underneath?



#4 scubadoo97

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

Nice plating on those pork chops - what are those stems underneath?


Agreed, nice plating Dcarch and great color on the smoked chops. Those might be some kind of chive under the chops. Garlic chive?

#5 dcarch

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 02:41 PM

Thanks guys. Those mini eggplants are creamy, mild and delicious.

 

Those stems are beet stems. I like cooking beet leaves and stems separate becuase they require diffferent cooking time.

 

dcarch



#6 mm84321

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 07:08 PM

Turbot and asparagus



#7 SobaAddict70

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:22 PM

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Savoy cabbage, potato and leek soup

The white stuff you see in the middle is a spoonful of Greek yogurt, with parsley and sea salt.

For folks who are curious, you can view the recipe here, courtesy of the excellent Deborah Madison -- http://www.illinoist...disonrss-r.html

This is not a soup you want to make using stock, btw.

Next:

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Fusilli with peas, pancetta and ricotta

If you have "Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking", the recipe for this is found on page 163 of the 2012 edition.

I think I'm going to have boatloads of fun with this book.

BTW, this took about 20 minutes to make from start to finish -- peas, pancetta, ricotta cheese, butter, sea salt, black pepper, Parm-Reg cheese and pasta.


As for the beet vinegar, here's what it looks like so far:

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Color's all right, but the taste isn't what I need it to be. I figure that's just an excuse to buy more beets; that way, I can get more peels.



#8 Hendrik

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:53 AM

@mm84321

You seem too be cooking quite a lot of turbot and doing it great!

I've never cooked any turbot myself, but would like to order one at the market. What minimum weight do you recommend to be able to cut those bone-in steaks from? What was the weight of this one for example?



#9 Ashen

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:15 AM

Reuben with homemade corned beef  

 

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#10 mm84321

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:32 AM

@mm84321

You seem too be cooking quite a lot of turbot and doing it great!

I've never cooked any turbot myself, but would like to order one at the market. What minimum weight do you recommend to be able to cut those bone-in steaks from? What was the weight of this one for example?

 

Thanks. This was cut from the tail end of a 13 pound fish, but you don't need to buy one that large. 6 pounds is probably the smallest I'd go. Here are some that I cut from a 5.8 pound fish:



#11 rod rock

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:38 AM

Modest last night dinner - Black beans!

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"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

 

Franchise Takeaway
 

 


#12 scubadoo97

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 10:43 AM

Thanks guys. Those mini eggplants are creamy, mild and delicious.
 
Those stems are beet stems. I like cooking beet leaves and stems separate becuase they require diffferent cooking time.
 
dcarch

 
Yes now on the big screen I can tell they are beet stems.  I use the stems a lot and usually cook the greens and stems together but slice the stems very thin so they cook quickly.  I think I like the stems better than the leaves.



#13 Jason Perlow

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:02 PM

Made some nice turkey wraps with the trussed smoked turkey breast I BBQed over the weekend.

 

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#14 Hendrik

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 12:09 PM

@mm84321

You seem too be cooking quite a lot of turbot and doing it great!

I've never cooked any turbot myself, but would like to order one at the market. What minimum weight do you recommend to be able to cut those bone-in steaks from? What was the weight of this one for example?

 

Thanks. This was cut from the tail end of a 13 pound fish, but you don't need to buy one that large. 6 pounds is probably the smallest I'd go. Here are some that I cut from a 5.8 pound fish:

 

Thnx for your reply! 6 pounds minimum sounds good.


Edited by Hendrik, 28 February 2013 - 12:10 PM.


#15 patrickamory

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:57 PM

A Persian interpretation of the Four Seasons crispy farmhouse duck. 

 

The marinade consisted of pomegranate molasses, grape molasses and saffron rosewater.

 

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Tahdig:

 

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Zereshk polo:

 

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#16 ScottyBoy

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 06:08 PM

Ohhhhhhh man that duck!


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#17 Steve Irby

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:39 PM

There have been a lot of killer post lately. Patrick - that  persian duck has me drooling. MM84321 and Baselerd posts continue to amaze. That photo by ScottyBoy of the salmon is my screen saver.  The nice thing about egullet is that regardless of  skill level the community is supportive and encourages us to expand our abilities.  



#18 basquecook

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:05 PM

made a quick batch of meatballs for the little one.  


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served with another few of the cheese ravioli i made.


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Edited by basquecook, 28 February 2013 - 11:06 PM.


#19 Lawless Cooks

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:05 AM

Sous vide vanilla-butter poached lobster tails. They were great!

 

 

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#20 rotuts

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:26 AM

about that grape molasses:  they would have that at the same middle eastern stores I get my pom. molasses?

 

I love the pom. molasses and use it with cold water for a Personal Beverage.



#21 patrickamory

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:56 AM

rotuts that's exactly right.



#22 rotuts

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:00 AM

thanks.  you get the (dried) barberries at the same place?  how might they compare with dried cranberries?



#23 Mr Holloway

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 12:55 PM

Reuben with homemade corned beef  

 

GEDC3878_zpseb07c11e.jpg

 

 Hey Dave

 This corn beef, was some of the best, I have ever tried(THE BEST homemade)

 The taste, texture and flavours, were all outstanding

 

 Thanks again, for bringing some to work, for me to try.

 Going on my "to do" list :biggrin:

 

 Shane


Edited by Mr Holloway, 01 March 2013 - 12:58 PM.


#24 mm84321

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 02:48 PM

Sweetbreads braise with olives, ricotta cannelloni, parsley and mustard puree



#25 Ashen

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:59 PM

Shane..   I am glad you liked it. I am very happy with it  and enjoying all the goodies I can make with it .. case in point.  

 

Breakfast for supper   corned beef hash with poached egg and green scotch bonnet hot sauce. 

 

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#26 patrickamory

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:06 PM

rotuts - yes, but smaller, more concentrated and more sour than cranberries. They are called zereshk in Farsi.

 

If you are in the Boston area (is that correct?), then try Super Heroes or Eastern Lamejun in Watertown.



#27 SobaAddict70

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:23 PM

it's poached egg night at Casa Soba, LOL.

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Sopa de ajo -- stale bread, chicken stock, garlic, olive oil, sea salt, pimentón, poached egg, parsley.

You can sub out the chicken stock for vegetable stock or even plain water, and it will be fine.

The parsley is my own addition, for color.


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Salade Lyonnaise, one of the crowning glories of France.

Recipe here, one of the few by Mark Bittman that I like: http://www.nytimes.c...html?ref=dining



#28 rarerollingobject

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 01:23 AM

I like the look of that Lyonnaise, Soba. And patrickamory, your pomegranate duck had me hankering for pom. molasses, so:

 

Green beans braised with pomegranate molasses, chilli, lime and walnuts

 

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With swordfish and tahini garlic sauce.

 

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#29 huiray

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 07:40 AM

Lovely dinners from all, both complex and simple.

 

@ dcarch - just wondering, how do you keep the food warm while doing all that fantastic plating (surely it takes some time) and photography (yet more time)?

 

@ Ashen - Nice dinner. (Why call it breakfast-for-supper? It's simply supper. Or dinner.) :smile:

 

@ mm84321 - No truffles this time, I see.  :wink:  Just curious (like others here, I think) - do you have a special or private supply of truffles for your many other meals incorporating it?

 

@ patrickamory - nice looking duck.  Any pics of it cut-up and showing the meat and insides?

 

@ sobaaddict70 - lovely elegant dishes as usual.

 

@ red rock - yes, pussycat seems to be wondering where his/her share is, heh.

 

 



#30 huiray

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 07:50 AM

I seldom post on the dinner thread - my night-time meals have tended over recent years to be simple, modest things, seldom the complex and lovely spreads that so many of you show here.  Not infrequently I don't even have dinner.  (I do have full, more elaborate meals from time to time. Especially if I dine out.)

 

Here's what I had last night: pork, cabbage & XO sauce "Shui Kow" dumplings [Prime Food][they're decent] with finely chopped white cabbage in a sautéed-garlic-chicken-stock soup.

 

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