Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

What did you buy at the liquor store today? (2013–)


  • Please log in to reply
534 replies to this topic

#61 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,793 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 15 March 2013 - 01:29 PM


Got the 100 proof "Hawaiian Moonshine", known locally as "Okolehao" (which means iron bottom, or more precisely bottom iron, to describe the rounded bottom iron three legged pot first used to distill the spirit in the 1790's), and the Okolehao liqueur on my recent trip to Hawaii. The liqueur is very sweet and tastes like a coconut rum (both are cane sugar based products) but the 100 proof Okolehao spirit is quite interesting. It is flavored with the root of the Ti plant and tastes a bit like a sweet tequila with an interesting vegetal component. Quite good on its own as well as a mixer. But not readily available outside of Hawaii that I know of except online (the liqueur may be in a few places in California).

 

 

Regarding the okolehao liqueur, my bottle does not taste sweet. You are right that there is a faint tropical/coconut flavor at first, but coconut rum does not come to mind. After this faint  flavor, it packs a ton of punch & funk. It may be interesting to try it in an Eastern Sour instead of the bourbon. The stuff seems lethal though (and the Polynesian Paralysis well deserves its name! Better sit in a very comfortable chair before starting to sip on one). Maybe they have "refined" their formula over the years? My bottle was acquired at least a couple of years ago I believe.



#62 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 670 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 15 March 2013 - 01:52 PM


Got the 100 proof "Hawaiian Moonshine", known locally as "Okolehao" (which means iron bottom, or more precisely bottom iron, to describe the rounded bottom iron three legged pot first used to distill the spirit in the 1790's), and the Okolehao liqueur on my recent trip to Hawaii. The liqueur is very sweet and tastes like a coconut rum (both are cane sugar based products) but the 100 proof Okolehao spirit is quite interesting. It is flavored with the root of the Ti plant and tastes a bit like a sweet tequila with an interesting vegetal component. Quite good on its own as well as a mixer. But not readily available outside of Hawaii that I know of except online (the liqueur may be in a few places in California).

 

 

Regarding the okolehao liqueur, my bottle does not taste sweet. You are right that there is a faint tropical/coconut flavor at first, but coconut rum does not come to mind. After this faint  flavor, it packs a ton of punch & funk. It may be interesting to try it in an Eastern Sour instead of the bourbon. The stuff seems lethal though (and the Polynesian Paralysis well deserves its name! Better sit in a very comfortable chair before starting to sip on one). Maybe they have "refined" their formula over the years? My bottle was acquired at least a couple of years ago I believe.

Could be. I just got mine this past December. I will try it again and see.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#63 Adam George

Adam George
  • participating member
  • 438 posts
  • Location:London - UK

Posted 18 March 2013 - 06:31 AM

Not liquid, but I visited Cocktail Kingdom UK and splashed out somewhat. (Pun? No pun?)

post-71345-0-12130200-1363613417.jpg


The Dead Parrot
Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Cocktails, Craft Beers, English Wines in provincial Sussex 


#64 EvergreenDan

EvergreenDan
  • participating member
  • 956 posts
  • Location:Boston

Posted 18 March 2013 - 03:55 PM

Tempus Fugit Kina L'Avion d'Or. I used it in a Twentieth Century, which was okay (not my favorite drink). Any ideas for good applications? The stuff is pretty expensive for an aperitif wine, so I want to show it to good effect.

 

I exhibited great restraint in passing up Kummel, Mehkong, Imbue Bittersweet and Petal & Thorn vermouths, a bunch of ryes that I hadn't seen before, some Texan corn whiskey, 3 St George gins, Sorel liqueur.

 

I am so screwed if I walk past that place again.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#65 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,793 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:18 PM

Tempus Fugit Kina L'Avion d'Or. I used it in a Twentieth Century, which was okay (not my favorite drink). Any ideas for good applications? The stuff is pretty expensive for an aperitif wine, so I want to show it to good effect.

I would try a CR No. 2. How does it taste neat compared to Lillet and Cocchi Americano?



#66 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 902 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:27 PM

Nothing fancy, just a 1.75 L of Weller 12 year...neck & neck (with the Weller 107) for best value in bourbon, imo.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#67 devillighter

devillighter
  • participating member
  • 9 posts

Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:20 PM

Nothing fancy, just a 1.75 L of Weller 12 year...neck & neck (with the Weller 107) for best value in bourbon, imo.

 

Wish they sold this in my state. The 107 is awesome and I always have a bottle open on my bar.

 

I picked up some Russell Henry London Dry Gin (from the Germain Robin people), but haven't cracked it open yet.



#68 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,793 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:29 PM

Bought the two bottles on the left (Picon, Clement canne bleue 2011) during a recent trip to France. The one on the right (terroir gin) after an epic tasting of St. George spirits.

8570813336_3141d052f9_z.jpg

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 18 March 2013 - 07:35 PM.


#69 Brown Hornet

Brown Hornet
  • participating member
  • 138 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:15 AM

Frogprincesse -- what do you think of St. George's Terroir Gin?  Their gins sound a bit busy with botanicals but I haven't had a chance to try them yet and was curious, especially the rye gin.



#70 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,793 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:37 AM

Frogprincesse -- what do you think of St. George's Terroir Gin?  Their gins sound a bit busy with botanicals but I haven't had a chance to try them yet and was curious, especially the rye gin.

Brown Hornet - I only have good things to say about it. It delicious, even neat. Lots of botanicals (sage, fir) but they are not overpowering. Lance Winters, their master distiller, said that he was inspired by the smells he experienced during his hikes in Northern California. The Botanivore is more floral and has more citrus. The Dry Rye gin resembles a genever with more spice. I tried their three gins (there is a fourth, the Faultline, a limited release) and the Terroir was my pick.There is not a bad one in the bunch though.



#71 Yojimbo

Yojimbo
  • participating member
  • 150 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn, NY

Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:13 PM

Re-upped on the Doulin dry and splurged for Gran Classico bitters while buying a mixed case of wine (partly mixed, half of it was the vinho verde to which my wife is addicted, God help me).

 

I'm finding the GC eminently mixable, not just with the obvious (gin, rye), but with blanco tequila as well.


"The thirst for water is a primitive one. Thirst for wine means culture, and thirst for a cocktail is its highest expression."

Pepe Carvalho, The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vazquez Montalban

#72 eatrustic

eatrustic
  • participating member
  • 683 posts

Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:57 PM

Thought I'd give blended Scotch a try and picked up a bottle of Compass Box Great King Street and a friend has just brought me back a bottle of the famous Yamazaki 18 yr from Japan....



#73 EvergreenDan

EvergreenDan
  • participating member
  • 956 posts
  • Location:Boston

Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:11 PM

@frogprincess: No Lillet on hand, but I happen to have Cocchi Americano open.

 

Cocchi Americano: Light straw color, apricot, pear, white wine, moderately sweet, not bitter initially, building bitterness after the swallow. Pleasant. Too sweet to drink neat without acid, but very pleasant and accessible for the bitter-minded.

 

Tempus Fugit Kina L'Avion d'Or: Rusty tan/brown color, citrus and berry, not much wine, modestly sweet, more immediately bitter which lingers and evolves. I could drink it straight, but I'd probably rather it with a squeeze of lemon. More challenging / less accessible than Cocchi. Interesting and worth seeking out. Not very similar to Lillet (from memory -- haven't had a bottle in a while). Expensive ($33 in Boston).

 

And thanks for the St George gin reviews. I've been eyeing them. I'll try Terrior next I think.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#74 Tri2Cook

Tri2Cook
  • participating member
  • 3,633 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 26 March 2013 - 01:47 PM

I didn't actually buy anything, just thought I'd give a heads-up. I haven't seen it locally yet but Lemon Hart (80) is now stocked by the LCBO. I hope that eventually leads to them getting the 151. If Alberta can get it, Ontario should be able to as well.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#75 Moto

Moto
  • participating member
  • 71 posts

Posted 29 March 2013 - 10:51 AM

Just received a case of Malacca that I special ordered from my local state owned liquor store.

Attached Images

  • malacca.JPG


#76 ChrisTaylor

ChrisTaylor
  • host
  • 1,999 posts
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 29 March 2013 - 03:05 PM

It's delicious. It's also very expensive. When I sampled it first I right away wanted to buy some. Could get it at a couple of plays but it was about $220 per bottle. Nice, yeah, but not $220 worth of nice.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#77 Moto

Moto
  • participating member
  • 71 posts

Posted 30 March 2013 - 06:31 AM

$220!!!  In the States it is $33 per bottle So the whole case was about $190.  Does that $220 reflect the impact of taxes in your neck of the wood or is something else going on.  If it was easy to ship alcohol I would say we have a classic business opportunity.



#78 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,884 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 01 April 2013 - 06:27 PM

Ran out of gin, running out of rye, and the rest were on sale and I couldn't say no:

 

527240_887625589411_1841412585_n.jpg

 

Yeah, 4 bottle of Rittenhouse for $18 a pop. Score!!!



#79 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,884 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 03 April 2013 - 11:23 AM

And after a visit to Ace Beverage:

 

543108_888144414681_706108982_n.jpg

 

Vermouth galore (to test out on negronis, per the Ideal Negroni thread), Chartreuse after months of hesitating over the price, and real Curaçao, for when I feel Cointreau isn't appropriate.



#80 EvergreenDan

EvergreenDan
  • participating member
  • 956 posts
  • Location:Boston

Posted 03 April 2013 - 05:46 PM

That little bottle of CAF is cute. It looks like a puppy with big paws.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#81 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,884 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:05 PM

Funny, I adopted a puppy with big paws almost 3 weeks ago!

 

Yeah, it was either a full litre at over $30, or that at a bit over 10....I figured I'd try it out before committing



#82 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,884 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 03 April 2013 - 07:50 PM

Hm, is it supposed to be so bitter? 



#83 ChrisTaylor

ChrisTaylor
  • host
  • 1,999 posts
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:20 AM

$220!!!  In the States it is $33 per bottle So the whole case was about $190.  Does that $220 reflect the impact of taxes in your neck of the wood or is something else going on.  If it was easy to ship alcohol I would say we have a classic business opportunity.

 

Tax. Stuff is just expensive here. Rittenhouse 100? Yeah, that's $80-90. Seen it a little cheaper elsewhere but, put it this way, if the price tag starts with a 7 you've found yourself a bargain. Go you. Wild Turkey's rye is more reasonably priced at $50something. Still yet to see the lower proof version of WT that eGulleteers have been moaning about, tho'. I guess it doesn't sell enough for us to have exhausted our supply of 101 yet.

 

As for shipping alcohol to/from Australia, the cost of postage for a bottle of, er, wine is obscene. I think US postage is only slightly cheaper than Australian Post. SeaMail is 'cheap' at about $40-50AUD/USD per bottle (once packed/padded/etc) and it's not like you're going to be sending anything made of glass by SeaMail, is it? To send a bottle of wine to the US it cost me something like $60 or $70. Small chance of a small quantity of alcohol being noticed, tho'. I mean, you can  post wine--actual wine, I mean--wherever you like and no one cares. Well, below certain quantities, anyway. Friends and I have ordered from Whisky Exchange a number of times and only got picked up (and hit with duty by Customs) once. Parcels send privately have not been uncovered. Roll the dice, if you like.


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 04 April 2013 - 01:25 AM.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#84 Adam George

Adam George
  • participating member
  • 438 posts
  • Location:London - UK

Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:40 AM

Hm, is it supposed to be so bitter? 


Yeah, not so much as Punt, though.

The Dead Parrot
Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Cocktails, Craft Beers, English Wines in provincial Sussex 


#85 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 902 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 04 April 2013 - 07:54 AM

I didn't buy anything, but I did pick up a dozen empty boxes from the liquor store yesterday...the logistics of moving a ~200 bottle bar across the country are daunting.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#86 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 670 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:32 AM

I didn't buy anything, but I did pick up a dozen empty boxes from the liquor store yesterday...the logistics of moving a ~200 bottle bar across the country are daunting.

Time for a party! A really, really big party...

 

I don't plan to be moving for a few years yet but that time is likely coming and I don't look forward to it.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#87 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,793 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:57 AM

I didn't buy anything, but I did pick up a dozen empty boxes from the liquor store yesterday...the logistics of moving a ~200 bottle bar across the country are daunting.

Time for a party! A really, really big party...

 

I don't plan to be moving for a few years yet but that time is likely coming and I don't look forward to it.

 

Regarding moving your liquor library, see Matt Rowley's (mbrowley) handy little tip involving Teflon/plumber tape.



#88 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,370 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:37 PM

Funny, I adopted a puppy with big paws almost 3 weeks ago!

 

Yeah, it was either a full litre at over $30, or that at a bit over 10....I figured I'd try it out before committing

A bit over $10? It was $15 (I bought a few bottles there last week)!  

 

Which, btw, is still way cheaper than here in NY at Astor where it is around $18.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#89 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,884 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 04 April 2013 - 08:52 PM

By a bit I mean a couple bucks, three at max. I'm pretty sure it was around $12. Of course that doesn't include the obnoxious 10% DC sales tax



#90 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 670 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 05 April 2013 - 04:25 PM

Regarding moving your liquor library, see Matt Rowley's (mbrowley) handy little tip involving Teflon/plumber tape.

That is indeed a great tip and one I will try to remember.
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2