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What did you buy at the liquor store today? (2013–)


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#391 tanstaafl2

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 02:05 PM

And now it looks like they've bought my favourite Canadian whisky distiller, and one of only a handful of independent distillers in Canada. This saddens me; I guess I'll have to stock up now before they get their hands on the product.

 

 

Hmmm. I guess I better quit putting off grabbing that bottle of Copper Pot Reserve I've been wanting to try.
 

 

You might still have a bit of time but I wouldn't dawdle! It appears Hall will be hanging around for the time being but there is already some speculation on how long he might last. If he gets frustrated/annoyed with the realities of corporate decision making he may bolt sooner rather than later.

 

It will be interesting to see if some of the special editions get any wider distribution or if the intial focus will be on the basic stuff. But as they try to increase distribution stocks are likely to get stretched thin pretty quick. Can't make more overnight! 


Edited by tanstaafl2, 13 March 2014 - 02:06 PM.

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#392 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 04:03 PM

Good hunting tonight.  If I could get pictures out of my son's camera I would share.  Sadly the list would be tedious to type.  Mostly rums (lots of rum), a couple ryes, Cognac, absinthe, Laird's bottled in bond, a few other things...



#393 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 12:11 AM

Rum madness. Inner Circle Green, Coruba and Ron Zacapa 23.


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#394 choux

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 10:51 AM

Time to catch up!

Hassouni, the Lomon Hart 80 is still in the yellow/red laballing.

Thanks for the suggestions Frogprincesse, I tried the Warning Label, I only had Carpano Antica and I think it was a bit dominant in the drink. I am having trouble finding any grapefruit other than Ruby Red, either fresh or juiced. Do you think they will work ok?

Tanstaffl2, I haven't gotten around to trying it yet, will soon.

 

As far as what I picked up recently, I found Dolin Vermouth! Finally made its way to Canada! I bought the red and dry, I will probably get the blanco next time.



#395 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 10:59 AM

 

Thanks for the suggestions Frogprincesse, I tried the Warning Label, I only had Carpano Antica and I think it was a bit dominant in the drink. I am having trouble finding any grapefruit other than Ruby Red, either fresh or juiced. Do you think they will work ok?

 

Carpano Antica ≠ Punt e Mes which is more bitter and does not have that vanilla flavor.

 

The grapefruit juice is for the tiki drinks, correct? In that case the ruby red should be fine. It's just a small amount.


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#396 radtek

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 02:21 PM

A bottle of George DIckel rye. Damn tasty and affordable. My house bourbon.

 

Also a bottle of Maison Rouge vsop cognac. It's meant for cooking but am sure I'll drink half of it...



#397 EvergreenDan

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 02:50 PM

Carpano Antica ≠ Punt e Mes which is more bitter and does not have that vanilla flavor.

Agreed. I'd sub equal parts Carpano Antica, Campari, and some dry vermouth for Punt e Mes. Not the same, but would probably work okay. The vanilla in Carpano can be a problem.


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#398 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 08:14 PM

Drinkupny order arrived yesterday!

esxk.jpg

 

The Falernum is a restock but the rest is all new to me. Should e fun playing with these new toys!

 

Odd, I just noticed that four of the six were in my last drinkupny order.


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#399 Adam George

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 08:54 AM

Not a store purchase but a transatlantic trade:

 

Thanks to Brian Johnson of Better Cocktails at Home, I am now potentially the first British owner of Jamie Boudreau's Cherry Bitters and The Pacific Northwest's Gentleman's Companion aka The Canon Cocktail Book.  

In return, Brian will be receiving a couple of items he can't get in the States: Amer Picon and Kamm & Sons.

 

IMG_20131229_101040.jpg

 

I haven't had a chance to use the bitters yet, but upon first impression, they're fantastic.  Lots of Chrismassy, cherry loveliness and intensely bitter.  Fee's could learn a lot here.  These make the latter's bitters taste like confectionary.  A great addition to my collection

 

The book is wonderful also, but not as much what I was expecting.  
Let me first say, of all the cocktail books I own this is the most exquisite.  The production value, of what is essentially the bar's menu is astounding.  The cover and other artwork is perfectly styled and it's printed on the heaviest paper of any book I've had.  

Inside is a brief introduction and then drinks are listed categorised by spirit - then in alphbetical order. 

This is where the book falls down:  Simply not enough drinks.  Specifically, not enough Canon signature drinks.  There are about 120 drinks listed, and most are classics.  There are a few contemporary drinks from modern American bars, but most drinks listed are the house specs of classics you and I will all know.

For those looking for a truly immersive bar book, the PDT book delves a lot deeper and a have a feeling that the Canon book was drafted some two years ago and simply took a long time to get to press.  Given the interesting signature cocktails on rotation at the bar, it would be great to see a second edition, but I would not expect that for a while now.

Other niggles I might have are that certain drinks are listed twice when they contain multiple spirits (Cheating!) and sometimes ingredients are ambiguously listed. (Rum, White Rum, and Aged Rum are called for.  Sherry, Dry Sherry and Cream Sherry also)  There are no brands called, except for liqueurs - a criticism some had of the PDT Book, but something I found very helpful when envisaging the flavour profile the bar intended.

However, it's worth remembering this is a menu and If I were writing a menu, I'd list "Aged Rum" or "Old Tom Gin" rather than a brand, so as to keep wording down, too.

 

Also, can we all just agree the metric system makes more sense, please?!

 

So in conclusion; a lovely book.  Not essential, but it's a charming addition to any drinks fanatic's library and clearly a labour of love on the bar's part.  

 

(Rafa, want some Picon for the Dead Rabbit book?)

 

 

Also, I posted this in Kitchen, but no one cared.  You lot think I'm cool now, right?:

 

 

 

Technically not thrift shopping as I bought it from the junk shed at work.
I got tired of waiting for Anova to short their shit out so bought roughly £1000 worth of professional circulator and insulated bath for £100.

I spent the day scrubbing it down and am yet to stick it in some descaler as it beat my iron wool but otherwise it's fully working and now clean.
It runs from Ambient +5 to 95 degrees C on a 1.25kW motor and is made in sunny old England.

It'll probably be the first piece of big machinery at the bar I'm soon opening. I'll eventually buy an Anova to look pretty in my home kitchen.

attachicon.gif post-71345-0-32083300-1394994275.jpg

 

Edited by Adam George, 21 March 2014 - 08:59 AM.

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#400 Rafa

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 09:11 AM

Oddly, I was about to propose the exact trade. Though I believe the DR book won't be ready for a few months yet—I'll check during my weekly splurge visit. I'm disappointed to hear that about the Canon book. The Dead Rabbit one promises to be more informative. Even their takes on the classics are revelations. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#401 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 09:30 AM

Also, I posted this in Kitchen, but no one cared.  You lot think I'm cool now, right?:

 

Clearly you are the epitome of coolness. Otherwise we would not be talking to you (let's see if I can get you to send me some stuff too! ;-)

 

Regarding Picon, is that the one with the red label (Picon Bière) or the black one (Picon Amer)? In France I see the Bière all the time in stores, but the Amer seems more elusive. I've always wondered what the difference was; I believe the Amer has a higher in alcohol content, but is the flavor at all different?


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#402 Adam George

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 09:39 AM

I am elusive, hence I got Brian Picon Amer.  Amer is 21%, Biere and Club are 19%.  The latter two taste identical to me.  I haven't even tried Amer yet.

 

I'd be up of doing more trades, but shipping direct from TWE was expensive.  On the plus side, it was insured and I don't have to worry about packaging.  


Edited by Adam George, 21 March 2014 - 09:45 AM.

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#403 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:26 PM

I went in searching for Guinness in bottles - none to be found.

 

Came out with this - 

 

IMG_1128.jpg

 

Made a rather nice Little Italy with it.


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#404 Czequershuus

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 09:37 PM

A car repair turned out unexpectedly inexpensive, so I stopped into a store to fritter away a part of this windfall. Walked out with a nicely discounted bottle of Cointreau (restock), and a 375 ml bottle of Buffalo Trace White Dog Rye Mashbill. This is my first foray in to unaged whiskey, and after a quick sample I must say I am impressed. The fruity, spicy character is so strong. I love assertive spirits, and this does not disappoint. Does anyone else get a strong hint of peach from this? Anyway, I am very satisfied with the purchase. 



#405 Tri2Cook

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:54 PM

Nothing fancy. I went to the local store with no hope at all that they'd brought anything new in. It's such a rare event to find anything other than the same stuff they've had on the shelves forever that this was a nice surprise... so I decided to grab it while I had the opportunity.

IMG_1166_zpsafbafab6.jpg



 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#406 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 02:58 PM

Bonus - now if they'd just bring you the Rittenhouse.



#407 Tri2Cook

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:24 PM

Bonus - now if they'd just bring you the Rittenhouse.


I don't see that one happening but I still have a bottle of Saz 6 left so I'm not in panic mode.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#408 Moto

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 06:32 PM

Recently sample Hogo's(DC) version of the El Diablo. This prompted me to pick up the chateau Monet. I tried it at home and found it incredibly sweet and only vaquely alcoholic with nothing unique contributed by the tequila with the ratios described in PDT's book using Espolon(80 proof). I grabbed the 1800(100 proof) to experiment.  I decided to try it with higher proof tequila and slightly less liqueur;it worked perfectly.  I may sub in some  of my newly found fidencio for a portion of the tequila.  Just happened to find a bottle in a local liquor store.  In my neck of the woods you have to grab a gift like this when it appears.  On first taste it is quite close to the  Del Maguey vida.  Not a must have but no regrets. 

 

Speaking of smokiness does anyone have any experience with how consistent the level of smokiness across batches in distilled products?I have sampled other bottles Del maguey Vida that varied subutantially in the level of smoke.  Is this just par for the course in a handmade product?   I am not a big scotch fan but are whisky distillers able to keep the smokiness consistent. Is it even desirable to try to do so in whisky circles. 

 

Following up on the Hamilton Collection Jamaican black rum,  I tasted it back to back with a range of Goslings, J Wray  rums.  It smells like a jar of molasses but the taste is closer to diluted J Wray with just a twinge of caramel/molasses added. The caramel brings a very slight bitterness to to it. It definitely does not taste aged(nor does it claim to be).  It is definitely not a must have for any bar.  It does not follow or improve upon the profile of any other black rum.

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#409 Adam George

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:14 AM

I did not know about 1800 100.

 

I went to the Tapatio 110 launch and thought it was fantastic.


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#410 Rafa

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:40 AM

On first taste it is quite close to the  Del Maguey vida.  Not a must have but no regrets. 

 

Speaking of smokiness does anyone have any experience with how consistent the level of smokiness across batches in distilled products?I have sampled other bottles Del maguey Vida that varied subutantially in the level of smoke.  Is this just par for the course in a handmade product?   I am not a big scotch fan but are whisky distillers able to keep the smokiness consistent. Is it even desirable to try to do so in whisky circles.

 

I've noticed batch variation among the bottles I've had but none has been anywhere near as smokey as Vida. I've only had a few, though. 

 

I went to the Tapatio 110 launch and thought it was fantastic.

 

Agreed, first rate product. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#411 FauxPas

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 11:38 AM

I'm waiting for Shelter Point Distillery to start production of their Single Malt Whisky on Vancouver Island - they say they are one of only two in Canada. They grow their own barley on site and it sounds very interesting but I'm not knowledgeable enough to guess what kind of product they will produce. Any thoughts from others? They may release some this year and I will buy some for my husband to taste if available. (We live very near here for half the year.) . 

 

http://www.shelterpointdistillery.com/


Edited by FauxPas, 31 March 2014 - 11:48 AM.


#412 Hassouni

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 12:52 PM

Recently sample Hogo's(DC) version of the El Diablo. This prompted me to pick up the chateau Monet. I tried it at home and found it incredibly sweet and only vaquely alcoholic with nothing unique contributed by the tequila with the ratios described in PDT's book using Espolon(80 proof). I grabbed the 1800(100 proof) to experiment.  I decided to try it with higher proof tequila and slightly less liqueur;it worked perfectly.  I may sub in some  of my newly found fidencio for a portion of the tequila.  Just happened to find a bottle in a local liquor store.  In my neck of the woods you have to grab a gift like this when it appears.  On first taste it is quite close to the  Del Maguey vida.  Not a must have but no regrets. 

 

Following up on the Hamilton Collection Jamaican black rum,  I tasted it back to back with a range of Goslings, J Wray  rums.  It smells like a jar of molasses but the taste is closer to diluted J Wray with just a twinge of caramel/molasses added. The caramel brings a very slight bitterness to to it. It definitely does not taste aged(nor does it claim to be).  It is definitely not a must have for any bar.  It does not follow or improve upon the profile of any other black rum.

 

I'm guessing you got that Fidencio at Ace also? I find it not very pleasant on its own, at least not immediately after opening, but quite good when mixed. After opening, when there's a bit of air in the bottle, it gets better. Interesting about the Hamilton JA rum, if not surprising. 

 

 

I did not know about 1800 100.

 

I went to the Tapatio 110 launch and thought it was fantastic.

 

Tapatio like the hot sauce?



#413 Rafa

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 12:56 PM

Unrelated, beyond both being staples of Mexican cuisine. 

 

Bummer about the Hamilton rum, but yeah, not surprising. I'm much more excited about trying the gonzo-sounding dunderous new overproof from Lost Spirits–though if I recall, Hassouni, you've been skeptical about it on another forum. I share your general skepticism towards unnaturally dark young spirits, but my sense is that in this case that comes from extremely charred barrels basically soaked in sherry. 


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#414 mkayahara

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 01:39 PM

I'm waiting for Shelter Point Distillery to start production of their Single Malt Whisky on Vancouver Island - they say they are one of only two in Canada.

One of only two what? I can think of at least two other Canadian distilleries already putting out single malt whiskies: Glenora and Still Waters.
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#415 Hassouni

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 01:56 PM

Unrelated, beyond both being staples of Mexican cuisine. 

 

Bummer about the Hamilton rum, but yeah, not surprising. I'm much more excited about trying the gonzo-sounding dunderous new overproof from Lost Spirits–though if I recall, Hassouni, you've been skeptical about it on another forum. I share your general skepticism towards unnaturally dark young spirits, but my sense is that in this case that comes from extremely charred barrels basically soaked in sherry. 

 

Next you're gonna tell me there's an El Yucateco mezcal? I would buy the shit out of that!  :laugh:

 

You recall right, though it wasn't quite so much my being skeptical as curious, but my curiosity was met with intense skepticism. It does seem like it'll have some more promise though.

 

Really ever since I was given an empty mini barrel (a Clément barrel no less), all I want to do is fill it up with W&N OP. But that'll require a 3 digit expenditure on something that won't see the light of day for quite a while!  I have to wonder why W&N have not made an aged version of their overproof - it kicks so much more ass than their Appletons, and yet they get the 12, 21, and 50 year old treatment.


Edited by Hassouni, 31 March 2014 - 01:59 PM.


#416 Rafa

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 02:05 PM

I have to imagine that they've been quietly aging some for a few years now, ever since the cocktail revival put the Mai Tai on a pedestal and elevated the old W&N Dagger rum to mythic levels. 


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#417 Moto

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 05:22 PM

I have to imagine that they've been quietly aging some for a few years now, ever since the cocktail revival put the Mai Tai on a pedestal and elevated the old W&N Dagger rum to mythic levels. 

If they're shooting for the 17 years only 12 or so more years left to know!

 

I'm guessing you got that Fidencio at Ace also? I find it not very pleasant on its own, at least not immediately after opening, but quite good when mixed. After opening, when there's a bit of air in the bottle, it gets better. Interesting about the Hamilton JA rum, if not surprising. 

 

 

 

Tapatio like the hot sauce?

Actually I got the Fidencio in NC.  A rare find here.  I've seen several Fidencio selections at Ace, I usually let any spare cash go to Rums when I'm there.



#418 naomi12

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 01:40 AM

Today i could bought Carlsberg beers and two bottles of Johnny Walker Black Lable. 



#419 Hassouni

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 02:32 AM

I have to imagine that they've been quietly aging some for a few years now, ever since the cocktail revival put the Mai Tai on a pedestal and elevated the old W&N Dagger rum to mythic levels. 

 

One can only hope!



#420 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 09:15 AM

Following up on the Hamilton Collection Jamaican black rum,  I tasted it back to back with a range of Goslings, J Wray  rums.  It smells like a jar of molasses but the taste is closer to diluted J Wray with just a twinge of caramel/molasses added. The caramel brings a very slight bitterness to to it. It definitely does not taste aged(nor does it claim to be).  It is definitely not a must have for any bar.  It does not follow or improve upon the profile of any other black rum.

I tried a sample this weekend and thought that it was rather good. It did very well in a tiki drink too. It had a good level of funk with caramel and banana flavors, with a slight bitterness as you mentioned.