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Silpat or Parchment Paper


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#1 Shel_B

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:27 AM

For what uses may each of these be best?  What are some pros and cons of these items?  Silpat is a brand, yes?  Are there other brands of silicon pads?  Any that may be better than another?  Thanks!

 

... Shel


.... Shel


#2 weinoo

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:03 AM

Silpat is a brand, yes.

 

There are a number of other manufacturers of silicon baking mats.

 

For some reason, I like parchment for baking cookies, but I use the silicon mats for other things occasionally, like roasting vegetables.  I'll even put a silicon mat under focaccia, since I tend to bake that at a lower temperature than, say, pizza.


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#3 HungryC

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:42 AM

I don't like cleaning the silpat, so I use parchment for most things.

#4 lindag

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:03 AM

Agreed.  Cleaning the silpats can be a giant PITA.  For that reason I mostly use parchment these days.



#5 weinoo

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:05 AM

I lay the silpat flat in my sink, sprinkle a little BonAmi on it, and use a sponge or dobie.  I do both sides like this and then rinse - works pretty well, but I agree that they never feel as if they're clean.


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#6 minas6907

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:25 AM

Agree with the cleaning issue. I use parchment when baking, and silpats only for sugarwork. Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

#7 Darienne

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 07:52 AM

Cleaning...and then drying...is a nuisance but I use the silicone pads constantly for confection making, roasting vegetables, making dog cookies, flat freezing all sorts of things before bagging them. 

 

I have burnt ones, ruined ones, ruined looking ones, nice and clean ones.  And no, they are not actual Silpats. 


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#8 Porthos

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:25 PM

My 2 cents: I do almost everything that goes into the oven on 1/2 size baker's sheets (roughly 13 x 18) and only use parchment. I buy it already cut to size on-line. I general pay around $20 US for 200 sheets. That lasts me for about a year and a half. I have bought 2 silicone pads and have never used them. I like using the parchment and then cleaning it is tossing it in the trash.

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#9 OliverB

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:22 PM

I use silpat and other brands for cookies, the only thing I ever bake. Works great, I prefer it over paper. Cleaning isn't that hard, sink with warm water and soap, then a rinse. They don't crinkle and crumble up like paper.
I don't use them for anything else, if I roast something I line my sheet with aluminum in most cases or just use the sort of non stick sheet as is.

I only ever used the paper from the roll in a box, a pain to get flat and fiddle with, the pads are easy. I'd get the precut paper if I'd bake a lot, but it's a once a year thing for xmas and I don't have room to store sheet size paper. If I had or baked more, laziness would probably take over and I'd use the paper all the time. Not for roasting though, I roast veg at 400 degree and the paper gets semi burnt and I don't want that around my food. Foil it is, and nothing leaks underneath that either. They used to sell non stick foil too, not sure that still exists? Could be an other option to explore


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#10 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:25 AM

I use silicone mats (mine are a mix of exopats and silmats from silicomart) for cookies, bagels, croissants, buns, and many other applications; I've never roasted veggies on them (I have casseroles for that).  I use wax paper for roasting half squashes, bearing in mind that a half-squash for me is about 30 lbs.  Silicone mats are a bit of a PITA to clean, but it's a lot more environmentally friendly, and they're a one-time cost outlay.  Parchment paper is difficult to source here and expensive when I can find it, which means I am reluctant to buy it and use it.


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#11 lindag

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:39 AM

I wanted to add that I buy my parchment, pre-cut to sheet pan size, from King Arthur Flour.  It comes in big rolls and lasts forever.  And, they frequently offer it with free shipping.



#12 Porthos

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 11:26 PM

. I'd get the precut paper if I'd bake a lot, but it's a once a year thing for xmas and I don't have room to store sheet size paper.

 

Christmas cookies baking is the number one reason I use parchment.  We set up the cooling racks on our dining table and as each sheet of cookies comes out of the oven I slide the parchment with the cookies still on it off of the pan and onto a cooling rack.  That makes the "immeadiately remove the cookies from the sheet" instruction very easy to do.  Our cookie production is enough to fill 36 tins and two platters - generally about 16-18 different cookies and samples for the us as we go. I probably should state the we own 7 or 8 of the bakers half sheet pans that I mentioned above.

 

We bake brownies ( four half size hotel pans - using the disposable foil version) and bread puddings( two half size hotel pans - again using the disposable foil version) for each weekend we are participating in either the Southern California Renaissance Pleasure Faire (7 weekends in the spring) or in the Northern California Renaissance Faire (5 weekends in the fall) and always line the foil pans with parchment. If I'm baking a pizza at 400 degrees F it goes on parchment. above 410 F the parchment breaks down and browns.  Baking cod fillets - parchment. the list goes on...

 

We do not store them flat. They are folded over once and kept in a jumbo Hefty brand zipper bag and take up very little space that way.

 

This is how I do it but I certainly leave room for others to do what they like best.

 

Cheers


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#13 rotuts

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 06:36 AM

I use both , more or less as above.

 

of note there seem to be two types of parchment here:  white and brown.  the brown is somehow 'organic' or what ever.  its a lot slippery than the white.



#14 Edward J

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 03:47 PM

 I use both.

 

Silicone paper:  Lining out cake pans, brownie pans, and loaf pans, for rolling out dough (dough sandwiched inbetween) for cornets, for caramel slabs, and for freezing ready-rolled out and pre-cut dough discs in the freezeer.

 

Silpat: For cookies, sugar work, nasty sticky stuff like Italian nougat, and marshmallows