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The Next Big Thing – In Vegetables, Anyway


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17 replies to this topic

#1 weinoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 05:47 AM

We dine out frequently, which I suppose when one lives in NYC, exposes us to the beginnings of food trends as chefs start using ingredients until, well, we're sick of them.

That being said, we've been through the brussels sprouts wars and if I see (saw?) kale on one more menu, I'm probably going to scream. Now you can't turn around without cauliflower rearing it's fairly lovely head.

But I'm wondering what's going to be next? Since the brassica family seems to be high on everyone's list, and since it's a fairly affordable commodity, my bet is on cabbage.

Yours?
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#2 HungryC

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 06:01 AM

Oh Lord, won't something please replace kale and/or chard? I love both, but enough already. I vote for the baby green lima as the next trendy thing. It has the similar "I hated it in childhood so let me overuse it now" appeal as Brussels sprouts.

#3 catdaddy

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 06:35 AM

Maybe Nappa cabbage. It's good raw, cooked, fermented, and has that Asian cachet.

#4 Baselerd

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:27 AM

I've been noticing kohlrabi at trendy places more and more. Same with beets.

But with that said I will still eat brussels sprouts and kale any chance I get...

#5 Charcuterer

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:48 AM

Maybe it's the time of the year but I am seeing Parsnips and Celery root more now than ever before. Perhaps one of those could me the new It Veg.

#6 Reignking

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:08 PM

Romanesco?

#7 weinoo

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:40 PM

I've been noticing kohlrabi at trendy places more and more. Same with beets.



Yeah, I was walking home via Chinatown yesterday and there was tons of kohlrabi. Any great ideas on what to do with it?

Beets have long since passed their next big thing era.
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#8 Baselerd

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 03:07 PM

I believe it's really tasty fresh. I've also had some good pureed kohlrabi soups (vichyssoise).

Edited by Baselerd, 06 February 2013 - 03:08 PM.


#9 heidih

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 07:12 PM


I've been noticing kohlrabi at trendy places more and more. Same with beets.



Yeah, I was walking home via Chinatown yesterday and there was tons of kohlrabi. Any great ideas on what to do with it?

Beets have long since passed their next big thing era.


This kohlrabi topic has some interesting ideas

#10 PSmith

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 09:50 AM

One veg I love, but you rarely see in the shops or restaurants is something we call "purple sprouting". I grow it, and I am hoping to pick my first harvest of the season this weekend.
It is similar to broccoli, but has a more spinach like taste. It could become fashionable because of its rarity.

Runner beans are also a great vegetable that I have never seen in restaurants. They are available in supermarkets, but are usually picked when they are too large.

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#11 Beebs

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:57 PM

I hope it's rutabaga.  Rutabaga is my new favourite vegetable.



#12 weinoo

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:26 PM

Why?


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#13 Heartsurgeon

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:40 PM

Peruvian corn....frozen, and dried.

 

humungous kernels the size of your thumb. Very flavorful if prepared right (i cook the frozen kernels at 15 PSI for 10 minutes in a pressure cooker).

the dried version can be "popped" and seasoned for bespoke bar food.



#14 IowaDee

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:57 PM

Isn't that the source of corn nuts? Used to love those things but now I'd be worried about breaking
my teeth on them!

#15 Beebs

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:45 PM

Why?

 

Why I hope it's the next big thing?  Or why it's my new favourite? :wink:

 

It's my new fave because I never cooked rutabaga till I got a giant one in my fall CSA box - never bought it before, didn't know what to do with it.  Did some googling and roasted one half of the thing, save the other for something else (it was really big, had to use a cleaver).  Oh Em Gee - it was a revelation, sweet, delicious, flavourful.  The other half, mashed it with a potato & cream - yum!  I thought of it because I made a curry coconut soup with chunks of rutabaga for last night's dinner.  It's so versatile & keeps a long time, too.

 

I hope rutabaga gets its 15 mins in the spotlight, because there seems to be a trend for funny, weird, uncool veg that people normally/traditionally turn up their noses at, to have a moment of coolness.  Like brussel sprouts and beets and turnips (none of which I'd turn my nose up at!).  Go, Mighty Rutabaga!!



#16 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 06:47 AM

Beebs, maybe rutabaga is the next big thing! I recently got some (for the first time in years), cut it up in chunks and roasted with olive oil and salt. It was delicious, creamy and soft with a warm, sweet flavor. Really enjoyed it and the husband and kid begged me to make it again.

#17 Alex

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:09 PM

I've been noticing kohlrabi at trendy places more and more. Same with beets.



Yeah, I was walking home via Chinatown yesterday and there was tons of kohlrabi. Any great ideas on what to do with it?

Beets have long since passed their next big thing era.

Kolhrabi is so 20 years ago.


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#18 OliverB

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:19 PM

Kohlrabi is my new "discovery" since a booth owned by - I believe - Korean farmers now carries it. Nice little small ones. I haven't eaten it in decades, have to ask my mom how she made it (cooked somehow with some sauce). So far I've bought nice small ones and peeled them and julienned them (with a mandolin), did the same with a green apple. Sprinkle with good vinegar (sherry or something nice and fruity) to keep the apple from going brown, then just add what ever I have in salad leaves. Makes for a great crunchy salad! Add blue or other cheese, nuts, croutons. Really a nice fresh crunchy salad!

 

I rarely go out for dinner - cooking is way more fun to me than going out and I don't have to get a sitter for the kids, so I can't chime in on what's new and hot in the Bay Area right now, but if there were a dish with kohlrabi I'd give it a shot for sure!


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