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Benriner mandoline - how to use, how to stay safe


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Bojana

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:40 AM

I had my Benriner for a year now and I still cnanot get the hang of it. Hope to get some good advice here

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B0000VZ57C


Problem one: I find the guard awkward and badly designed. The veggies slip, there is waste and I even cut myself once because of using the guard - it slip.

Problem two: I find it very hard to make nice julienne on the mandoline. I was doing the medium setting with few mm lately for the green papaya salad and it was very hard, even though I was holding papaya in my hand. I had to cut only the small surface of the vertical cut, cutting the long strips of the horizontal surface was impossible. I never used the largest setting for the julienne, imagine that would be difficult too.

For problem one, I was thinking of protective gloves. Any recommendations? Problem 2, I must be doing something wrong. Please help me figure it out.

#2 Mjx

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:34 AM

I haven't got a mandoline yet, since I'm still researching the various options, but in anticipation of this much-coveted device, I did get some protective gloves, because I find most guards on devices to be a bit awkward (and okay, I'm nervous as hell about slicing off a portion of myself in a split-second of distraction). Comparing the options, the ones that looked best in terms of protection were some kevlar ones by G&F products that got good feedback on amazon.

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#3 Paul Bacino

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:35 AM

I use a Kelvar glove from C-Kure. I never use the guard.

I have the Super Benriner.. its a bit wider.

I wonder if placing a damp towel under your machine to help with some type of securing ground base, might help ,so you can get a good push going..That wider cuts need a solid continuous push.

Good luck..I like mine for what I use it for

Paul

Edited by Paul Bacino, 25 January 2013 - 05:41 AM.

Its good to have Morels

#4 scubadoo97

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:45 AM

A glove is good. I don't find the guard a problem. It works when I use it but don't use it all the time. I've learned to flex my hand and fingers up when slicing close to the blade like when shaving asparagus. There will be some waste but not bad.

I recently used the large julienne blade to make a green and yellow squash salad

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1359117684.748255.jpg

Just go slow and practice with it. It's a good mandoline
If you're good with knife sharpening, the blade is easily removed for sharpening or stropping before use

#5 rotuts

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:55 AM

no matter how you cut it, that last bit is the bit that will give you trouble. use it for something else.

#6 Charcuterer

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 07:14 AM

I second the gloves. They really do take the nerves out of using the Benriner.

#7 Bojana

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:32 AM

Great tips, thanks. I am about to order the Kelvar gloves. How snug is the fit? I am a girl with small hands, slightly concerned that the gloves would be too big for me. I saw few other products that come in XS size but I do not know whether those offer good protection against the mandoline.

#8 Charcuterer

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:41 AM

If they are Kevlar they will be fine against the blade. My wife has petite hands and the small fit her perfectly.

#9 Bojana

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:05 AM

I have just ordered Kevlars, thanks

#10 scubadoo97

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:33 AM

no matter how you cut it, that last bit is the bit that will give you trouble. use it for something else.


Absolutely.

#11 gdenby

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 03:59 PM

I too find the blade guard to be awkward. It doesn't grip well, and often makes it harder to push the food thru smoothly.

I just use my fingers to hold the food. I have trouble finding gloves that fit my hands well enough to do any fine work.

So, I also pay attention and stop before the last few slices. The last bits go under a knife if they are needed.

#12 patrickamory

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:46 PM

I have one and love it for slicing.

But... I got Kevlar gloves too, and the blade cut the tip neatly off one of the fingers, barely missing the tip of my brother's flesh.

I would not rely on gloves as any kind of primary protector. Use the guard, awkward though it is, and be careful.

#13 gfweb

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 07:30 PM

Kevlar gloves or a towel. Either work well. I find the guard awkward.

Edited by gfweb, 25 January 2013 - 07:31 PM.


#14 nickrey

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:26 PM

After a few mishaps (those are nasty little cuts!) I invested in some kevlar gloves. I just keep my palm flat against what I'm pressing across the blade and don't use the guard. Works like a dream.

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