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Hummus: With the soaking/cooking liquid or not?


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13 replies to this topic

#1 Shalmanese

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 11:48 PM

For people who make hummus from canned chickpeas, do you use the liquid in the can or do you rinse it off and replace with water?

For people who make hummus from dried chickpeas, do you use the soaking liquid to cook with and do you use the cooking liquid to make hummus with?
PS: I am a guy.

#2 nickrey

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 12:32 AM

I use the canning liquid. It works well.

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
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#3 EnriqueB

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 12:54 AM

I make hummus from dried chickpeas. I don't use the soaking liquid (a brine) to cook the chickpeas. Some people do as it seems to be tastier and more nutritious, but also likely produces gases... I do use the cooking liquid (unsalted water with bay leaf, garlic and cumin) in the hummus, it does clearly make a difference. And the remaining cooking liquid is excellent for soups, cooking rice, etc.

More details here (very inspired by the hummus thread).

#4 scubadoo97

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 04:20 AM

I use the soaking liquid to cook and to thin when processing as long as its not too salty. It's very tasty liquid

#5 EnriqueB

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:14 AM

I use the soaking liquid to cook and to thin when processing as long as its not too salty. It's very tasty liquid

That's part of the reason why I discard the soaking brine and then cook in unsalted water. Also, using salt for soaking and not for cooking is supposed to be the option that cooks beans faster (even twice as fast) according to Harold McGee.

#6 rotuts

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:17 AM

I taste the liquid in the can, then decided. they vary in taste considerably

#7 radtek

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

I drain and rinse the canned version. I do not use the soaking liquid to cook any dried beans. Always use fresh water! The cooking liquid is discarded. However, the garbanzos aren't rinsed before mashing. I prefer to use citrus and olive oil to thin the hummus.

Since the dried beans take so long a bit of baking soda in the first soak really speeds up the process. Even so they might take more than 24 hours to plump up. And a pressure-cooker is invaluable...

#8 rotuts

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:39 AM

another reason to consider discarding the 'supernate' however it's made: it contains a fair amount of inulin:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inulin

it causes what Julila Child used to call the 'rooty toot toot' you get from eating beans!

#9 radtek

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:03 AM

I think chickpeas are the fartiest of all the legumes as it is!

#10 rotuts

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:21 AM

http://link.springer...0050228?LI=true

#11 Katie Meadow

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

I use garbanzos that come in a glass jar. I think they have better flavor than those in a can. And I have tried using dried garbanzos, but found that there isn't a significant enough difference once you add lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, cumin and paprika. One of my favorite things about making hummus is that it can be very good, given how easy and fast it is with prepared beans, and far better than most packaged products or even stuff from a deli. Maybe using high quality olive oil and fresh lemon and toasted ground cumin is enough to elevate it. Also it doesn't need near the amount of salt that most prepared stuff has in it.

I rinse the beans and toss the liquid. If I need to add more liquid for texture I'll use fresh water, but it doesn't take too much water if you are also adding oil. When I cook dried beans of other varieties I never use the soaking liquid. Again, I rinse the beans and use fresh water or stock. And after reading about inulin in Wiki, I can live without more of that.

#12 heidih

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 02:51 PM

I always rinsed out of habit. One day I just used the rather thick liquid. It was my best effort with canned beans ever. I do agree with rotuts that this is a brand specific and even batch specific issue. It only worked with the S & W beans purchased from the 99 cent store- no clue as to why.

#13 radtek

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:28 PM

The thing about canned beans in general is that one really has no idea how they were prepared. They certainly have an effect on me so my assumption is that they are inadequately soaked and/or flash cooked somehow- skins full of polysaccharides. One has to balance the convenience vs the quality.

I tell you what. My hummus is badass so if S&W is available I'll give it a shot.

#14 DocDougherty

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:34 PM

I buy dried chickpeas for $0.99/lb at my local Hispanic market and soak them overnight. Then I pressure cook them for 30 minutes at 15 psi to get them soft. After that I grind them in an Indian stone wet-grinder for 40 minutes with all the other ingredients to get it smooth. The beans are cooked with hot red chili and bay leaf in the pressure cooker. They are ground with lime juice, tahini, garlic, smoked paprika, salt, and a little guar gum (plus enough water to get the consistency right). It takes a day for the flavors to mellow, then it is good for about two weeks if it ever lasts that long. Makes a great bed for poached salmon. Top with a few capers.