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Immersion blenders – Bamix vs Cuisinart


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#1 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:23 PM

I have a cheap and nasty stick blender. I was initially considering upgrading to a full on benchtop blender but good ones are very expensive. It seems that a costly appliance in the States--say, a Vitamix--costs an obscene amount in Australia. $700 for the Vitamix, I mean. That's an expensive blender.

Anyway, I decided to look into good immersion blenders. Something in the 300-350W range. Powerful enough to make short work of vegetable soup, curry pastes, sauces, rehydrated chilli peppers and so on. I won't use it every day--I don't use my current one every day--but when I do I don't want to mess around.

There's a huge price difference between the 300W Cuisinart and 350W Bamix Gastro. Huge. $60 versus more than $400. Aside from the wattage and cost, is there anything significant that sets these two apart? The 240W Bamix is still considerably more expensive than the Cusinart model.

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#2 Syzygies

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:04 PM

I can't make the comparison with the Cuisinart, but I love our Bamix in one kitchen, I'm about to get one for my other kitchen. Of course one can use anything as a beaker, but I find myself using their beaker set all the time:

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B008ND7KYU
http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/B0028Y40S4

I also have a Vita-Prep in both kitchens. The Vita-Prep can do plenty that a bar blender would give up on, but there's a huge inertia effect to deciding to pull it out. Basically one uses the Vita-Prep rather than giving up, on a task that would be otherwise impossible. Or, one can make a Thai curry paste from scratch by cheating with some coconut cream (the paste fries in cream as the first step, after all; don't tell Kasma but I don't see a huge difference) that would otherwise be an hour of pounding, mortar and pestle. I most frequently use my Vita-Prep to grind pan-roasted chiles for barbecue rubs.

http://www.thaifoodandtravel.com

By comparison, one pulls out either a mortar and pestle or a "stick blender" at a moment's impulse, as an improvisation. Simple acts of not consciously cooking, like preparing spinach by sautéing garlic in olive oil, splashing in some sherry, one will pull out the stick blender to make a smooth sauce one might otherwise have left alone. The stick blender is clean and hanging in its cradle before the spinach is done.
Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#3 nickrey

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:22 PM

I've got the 240W Bamix and recommend it fully. Why is it more expensive? These things are made to last. Were you to buy one, I suspect it would be the last stick blender you would buy.

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#4 patrickamory

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:17 PM

The Bamix is definitely one of the sexier kitchen items out there... I've been very tempted, but I get by with a combination of the Iwatani Millser, the Ultra Pride+, my 14-cup Cuisinart and my mortar and pestle. There just isn't any more room! (Forget about the money!)

#5 lindag

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 06:18 AM

Also a big fan of the Bamix. Have had mine for at least 7 years now and it's just like new.
One thing it doesn't have is a removable shaft like some do...Kitchen Aid comes to mind.
I would like to be able to remove the shaft and put it in the d/w.

#6 budrichard

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:51 AM

Have Robot Coupe MINI MP190C, it's not Mini and the only way to go.
All th rest are consumer products and have time limts for run because heat builds up and cannot be dissipated.
Robot Coupe, no problem.
Don't know what they cost in Oz though.-Dick

#7 Syzygies

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:34 AM

Robot Coupe MINI MP190C

The Robot Coupe is 250 watts; the Bamix I linked to is 350 watts.

I understand this is only part of the story. Many cars can do 0 to 90 mph nicely, but a Porsche also does 90 to 0 nicely. But on what basis do you conclude that task for task, the 350 watt Bamix will overheat before the 250 watt Robot Coupe?

This is somewhat academic, as for any of my stick blender applications I'd ruin the food before the motor overheated. If I need to deliver sustained power to food I use my Vita-Prep.
Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#8 Keith_W

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

An immersion blender is NOT a substitute for a benchtop blender. Immersion blenders can make purees, but if you want the finest textured purees possible, you want a benchtop blender. You can still see particles when something is pureed with an immersion blender. Also - immersion blenders can not make smoothies, milkshakes (can't crush ice), nor can it crush iPhones or anything else in those "Will it blend?" videos :)

Having said that, nothing beats a stick blender for convenience, provided you are not too concerned about particle size. I use mine (a Bamix Swissline) VERY often, nearly every time I am cooking I will pull it out for something. It sure beats transferring whatever hot liquid I am working with to my food processor and then having to deal with spillage, wastage, and cleaning the bowl afterwards.

Before I owned my Bamix, I owned a Sunbeam stick blender for 10 years before it died. The Bamix is noticably smoother and quieter, although you wouldn't describe it as silent. Cleanup on the Bamix is dead easy - once I yank off the attachment, there are no annoying little nooks and crannies where food can get stuck.

I don't know about that Cuisinart, but there are plenty of people with 20 year old Bamix stick blenders around. I'm not sure there are very many people with 20 year old Cuisinarts. When you keep something for that long, the price difference is irrelevant.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#9 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:05 PM

I'm not sure about twenty years but I've had my KitchenAid immersion blender a real long time and I like it.

#10 jrshaul

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:23 PM

An important issue is power versus torque. A powerful but cheaply made lacks the force to actually turn the blades in viscous liquids, and the speed of the rotors under actual use will be lower than a motor designed for lower speeds and greater force.

There's also the issue of duty cycle. A motor turning at half its' unloaded RPMs is turning more than half its' power into heat, and is often designed to be used only a few minutes at a time to avoid overloading the motor. A more robust device will operate more efficiently and have the heat dissipation and cooling required for constant use. A pro unit can be left running for some time without risk; a consumer unit cannot.

#11 budrichard

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 02:05 AM

"But on what basis do you conclude that task for task, the 350 watt Bamix will overheat before the 250 watt Robot Coupe?"

I didn't say that. What I said is that "All the rest are consumer products and have time limits....."
Power alone is not an indicator of function. Consumer motors are lighter and cannot stand long time constant operation as the lighter motor heats up and cannot dissipate the heat. The Robot Coupe is sold as a commercial unit and has no time limit restrictions. Consumer models have time constrictions and specify that they are either not suitable or the warrenty is void if used in a commercial application.
You really have to ask the questions of the manufacturer or look in the instructions but a clue is, is it sold for consumer or commercial use.-Dick

Edited by budrichard, 04 January 2013 - 02:06 AM.


#12 Snadra

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 04:35 AM

What about something in the middle? I have a Braun multiquick like this one: http://www.billyguya...nder-mr530.html

It's about 5 or 6 years old, maybe more. I use it for soups, sauces, etc as an immersion blender, but it is also useful as a mini processor and its the appliance we take when we go to a holiday rental. I don't really rate the whisk but it works when you've nothing else. The processor works very well. The more expensive versions have fancier attachments if that's of interest. It's sturdy and seems pretty powerful.

That said, the bamix ought to last you a very long time, but at that price I'd be baulking too.

#13 scubadoo97

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 04:53 AM

Also a big fan of the Bamix. Have had mine for at least 7 years now and it's just like new.
One thing it doesn't have is a removable shaft like some do...Kitchen Aid comes to mind.
I would like to be able to remove the shaft and put it in the d/w.


It may not last as long with that feature. The Bamix shaft is completely sealed


#14 Erik Shear

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

I have a Cuisinart immersion blender and have had it just over 2 years and it has completely fallen a part. That said I used it every day with out fail for everything imaginable. It did it's job well but just wasn't designed to edure that kind of usage. Knowing that I am looking to replace mine with a Bamix.

#15 JBailey

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 11:30 AM

I have been through four or five stick blenders. Finally, I got a Robot Coupe Mini-end of the search. Give Robot Coupe a serious look. This is a piece of equipment that will last for years.
"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.
That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

#16 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 02:20 PM

It's a $1000 stick blender. I've no doubt it's very good but it's somewhat more than what I'm prepared to pay for a small appliance. I'm not going to be knocking out pureed soups for a hundred people, after all.

Funny you mention that about the Cuisinart stick blender. I think my Cuisinart icecream machine works just fine but, yes, the construction is clearly cheap. For something I use as infrequently as an icecream maker--and for something that is very limited in its potential applications, meaning I can't accidentally throw in something too 'heavy' for the paddle to mix--this is not a big deal. I would not replace a perfectly functioning icecream machine. If it died I suspect I'd live without one for a while. But it's a shame to hear that the poor build quality tag could also be applied the Cuisinart.

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#17 budrichard

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:50 AM

You can purchase the Robot Coupe 190vv for about $400USD in the USA which is about $380AUS last time I looked.
Shipping to OZ, I don't know?
http://www.katom.com/cart.html
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#18 Keith_W

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:33 AM

USA = 110V
Australia = 240V

Won't work unless you are happy to have a step-down transformer in your kitchen.
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#19 dcarch

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:21 AM

The power rating is important for a stick blender, equally, the max RPM for the motor. They don't generally give you that information. Get a cheap digital tachometer to check RPM when you shop.

You can have a 100 HP motor blender which will do nothing for you if it goes to only 100 RPM.

The difference in blade tip speed as it encounters the food is what makes chopping effectiveness, Here is a technique I use: I let the blender reach full speed and plunge into the food, pull out to let the motor reach full speed and plunge again and again. I use a tall container to avboid splashing.

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#20 budrichard

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

USA = 110V
Australia = 240V

Won't work unless you are happy to have a step-down transformer in your kitchen.


Appliances are designed and sold for the country they are used in by Code. Are you an Electrical Engineer? (I doubt it!)
http://www.hospitali...ets/RCMP160.pdf

Edited by budrichard, 05 January 2013 - 02:22 PM.


#21 Chez56

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 01:47 PM

"But on what basis do you conclude that task for task, the 350 watt Bamix will overheat before the 250 watt Robot Coupe?"

I didn't say that. What I said is that "All the rest are consumer products and have time limits....."
Power alone is not an indicator of function. Consumer motors are lighter and cannot stand long time constant operation as the lighter motor heats up and cannot dissipate the heat. The Robot Coupe is sold as a commercial unit and has no time limit restrictions. Consumer models have time constrictions and specify that they are either not suitable or the warrenty is void if used in a commercial application.
You really have to ask the questions of the manufacturer or look in the instructions but a clue is, is it sold for consumer or commercial use.-Dick

I have a Robot Coupe turbo 350 which I have had for probably close to 10 years. I went through numerous 1/2 gl commercial blenders before I finaly made the plunge to a stick blender. We do Soups, purees, & a 7Gl batches of curry base with all kinds of fruits, vegetables, etc in there that we cook until soft and buzz up with the stick blender in about 1/4 the time and half the mess of transferring back and forth to a blender. I agree the vitamix is a sweet machine, but it is no match for larger batch blending when it comes to commercial stick blenders. I think i paid about $450 to $600. when I bought it.