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Dinner! 2013 (Part 1)


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#211 huiray

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 03:41 PM

rod rock and huiray – Thanks!

The spinach - how long did you cook it and how much reduction (of stock other liquids, etc) did you do or did you just fish out the spinach and leave behind the residual cooking liquids?

Spinach was stir-fried in batches until barely wilted and then dumped in a colander over a bowl. After stir-frying the shallots and scallions, I added the stock and other liquids and reduced until it “tasted right” (not long), and then mixed in the spinach and spinach liquor.

I hope that helps, it wasn’t very precise.


Yes, what you describe is clear. A common way of doing a stir-fry veggie then. I imagine you "stir-fried" the spinach with minimal or no oil, basically to wilting - you might consider blanching the spinach in (perhaps oiled) hot water and draining next time, almost the same thing, followed by dressing the spinach with the "stir-fried sauce" of your choice as before.

#212 patrickamory

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:32 PM

A vastly disparate array of dishes from different cuisines prepared recently.

First, from Chichi Wang's column on Serious Eats, West Lake Soup with pork (西湖豚肉羹, if I've got the characters right). From Zhejiang province, this is an extremely easy soup but looks pretty impressive to guests and tastes delicious:

west_lake_soup.jpg

Then, travelling back in time to mid-'60s American home cuisine, the Presto pressure cooker recipe for Porcupine Meatballs, probably a surefire kid pleaser if I had kids in the house:

porcupine_meatballs.jpg

And finally, Bengali okra with mustard seeds (sorse dharush), one of my standbys (and I recommend it without reservation to anyone who thinks they don't like okra - it was the beginning of my conversion):

okra.jpg

#213 liuzhou

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 10:01 PM

West Lake Soup with pork (西湖豚肉羹, if I've got the characters right)



The characters are correct if the pork was suckling pig. Not something I've come across in soup. 西湖猪肉羹 would be more usual. Or just 西湖肉羹. If the meat variety isn't mentioned then, in China, it's pork.

Anyway your soup looks perfect.

Okra is something I sorely miss here in China. Love the stuff.

Edited by liuzhou, 17 January 2013 - 10:02 PM.


#214 ScottyBoy

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:13 PM

I was gonna sous vide but then I thought "can't you still cook a steak in a pan?". 3o day aged fillet (a little rusty getting med-rare). A hot quinoa salad, garlic confit, pastrami spices, tomatoes and some wild arugula. Haven't posted dinner in a while.

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#215 Prawncrackers

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:57 AM

You're crazy Scotty! Cooking steak in pan, hoodathunk? Nice work though, i'd say it was acceptably med rare. I wouldn't send it back that's for sure.

Edited by Prawncrackers, 18 January 2013 - 01:58 AM.


#216 nickrey

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:07 AM

45.8C here in Sydney today (that's 114F). That's our highest recorded temperature ever.

So it was time for a salad. This one was Thai salad with flaked sous vide cooked salmon (marinated after cooking in fish sauce). Salad leaves were mint and coriander. Also had cucumber, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves, long red chili, and freshly cut pineapple. Sauce had elements of tamarind as well as the usual suspects (palm sugar, fish sauce, chili, lime juice, some sliced herbs from the salad).

thai salad.jpg

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#217 Paul Bacino

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 05:33 AM

That's great Scott.!!

PatrickAmory-- Loves how light that looks

Nickrey--Nice flavors I bet!!

Edited by Paul Bacino, 18 January 2013 - 05:37 AM.

Its good to have Morels

#218 patrickamory

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:49 AM

Nice salad Nickrey... wowee... is that David Thompson, or your own creation? or a combo?

liuzhou - thanks! ah I see that character can be used for a piglet so that makes sense for suckling pig. btw my mother suggested 西湖猪肉汤, the last character tang being a less thick soup than geng 羹, what do you think?

#219 liuzhou

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:38 AM

my mother suggested 西湖猪肉汤, the last character tang being a less thick soup than geng 羹, what do you think?


(tāng) is the most common character for soup and wouldn't be wrong, but in my experience West Lake soup is more usually described as 羹 (gēng)- or 'thick soup'.

(But, I wouldn't dare argue with your mother! :smile: )

Edited by liuzhou, 18 January 2013 - 10:40 AM.


#220 huiray

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:24 PM

I was gonna sous vide but then I thought "can't you still cook a steak in a pan?". 3o day aged fillet (a little rusty getting med-rare). A hot quinoa salad, garlic confit, pastrami spices, tomatoes and some wild arugula. Haven't posted dinner in a while.

( http://farm9.staticf...158ffe56d_c.jpg )


Looks very nice, scotty. Glad the "traditional" ways still work. ;-) Definitely medium-rare, I'd love to have that steak on my plate.

#221 huiray

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:29 PM

my mother suggested 西湖猪肉汤, the last character tang being a less thick soup than geng 羹, what do you think?


(tāng) is the most common character for soup and wouldn't be wrong, but in my experience West Lake soup is more usually described as 羹 (gēng)- or 'thick soup'.

(But, I wouldn't dare argue with your mother! :smile: )


Well, "tang1" (汤 - simplified) (湯 - traditional) *is* the general term for "soup"... ;-)
I myself would tend to look at menu items with the term "湯" with a more encompassing view, so to speak. :-)

#222 nickrey

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 12:57 PM


Nice salad Nickrey... wowee... is that David Thompson, or your own creation? or a combo?

The original recipe is from Martin Boetz, who is one of David Thompson's protégées.

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#223 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 06:24 PM

Some leftover ragu. Make it better, put an egg on it! Friend just dropped off 2 dozen eggs, what to do...

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#224 patrickamory

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 08:21 PM

A standby, Madhur Jaffrey lamb kheema, made with a Persian twist this time, saffron dissolved in rosewater:

kheema.jpg

... plus the requisite tahdig:

tahdig.jpg

and some homemade lime pickle, just trying it for the first time, put it up about three weeks ago:

pickle.jpg

#225 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 08:52 PM

See that's the stuff I love to eat! Something I have no idea how to make, new flavors and textures! This is why I'm working on Taste/Smell-O-Internet.

Steak and eggs - Snake River Farms Wagyu, fresh farm egg, rye toast, port and blackberry syrup

Posted Image
Posted Image

Edited by ScottyBoy, 18 January 2013 - 08:53 PM.

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#226 Jason Perlow

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:20 PM

image.jpg

Pan Seared Scallops w/Quinoa over Salad Greens, Asian Vinaigrette
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#227 ScottyBoy

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 10:46 PM

I hadn't had quinoa in a long time, stuff is great. Cooked a batch and it's in the fridge for all kinds of stuff.
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#228 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:04 AM

Posted Image

The Zuni Cafe roast chicken with bread salad. I was surprised the meat turned out as juicy as it did, given the very high roasting temperature and the fact I didn't manage to take it from the oven until it as a good 5C above what I'd take it to if I was cooking it sous vide.

EDIT

If you're wondering where much of the chicken's skin has gone (which is the selling point of the Zuni chicken, supposedly) I ate ... some before taking the photo. Self control is something that happens to other people.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 19 January 2013 - 01:05 AM.

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#229 liuzhou

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 03:06 AM

Well, "tang1" (汤 - simplified) (湯 - traditional) *is* the general term for "soup"... ;-)


Yes. That is what I said. However, West Lake soup is traditionally a thick soup and more commonly referred to as 羹 (gēng).

I'm not sure what your point is.

#230 Ranz

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:01 AM

Posted Image

The Zuni Cafe roast chicken with bread salad. I was surprised the meat turned out as juicy as it did, given the very high roasting temperature and the fact I didn't manage to take it from the oven until it as a good 5C above what I'd take it to if I was cooking it sous vide.

EDIT

If you're wondering where much of the chicken's skin has gone (which is the selling point of the Zuni chicken, supposedly) I ate ... some before taking the photo. Self control is something that happens to other people.


It's one of my favourite things to make. The juiciness of the meat (even the breast) is astounding. And about the skin... Don't worry, I understand :laugh:

What herbs did you stuff it with? I usually use rosemary thyme and parsley, with slivers of garlic.

#231 Keith_W

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:50 AM

Posted Image

The Zuni Cafe roast chicken with bread salad. I was surprised the meat turned out as juicy as it did, given the very high roasting temperature and the fact I didn't manage to take it from the oven until it as a good 5C above what I'd take it to if I was cooking it sous vide.


That looks awesome! I have never heard of this, had to Google it. Fortunately, the web abounds with recipes for this. Something I have to make.
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#232 Ranz

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:59 AM

That looks awesome! I have never heard of this, had to Google it. Fortunately, the web abounds with recipes for this. Something I have to make.


Try this one, it has never failed me.

Edited by Ranz, 19 January 2013 - 08:59 AM.


#233 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:39 PM


Posted Image

The Zuni Cafe roast chicken with bread salad. I was surprised the meat turned out as juicy as it did, given the very high roasting temperature and the fact I didn't manage to take it from the oven until it as a good 5C above what I'd take it to if I was cooking it sous vide.


That looks awesome! I have never heard of this, had to Google it. Fortunately, the web abounds with recipes for this. Something I have to make.



You have a smoker, right? Can it maintain a high temperature (i.e. ~225C)? If so you might want to cook the chicken in there (with a very small quantity of a mild timber--nothing so strong as, say, hickory) as the recipe mentions that the chicken should have a slight smokiness to it (I think they cook it in a wood-fired oven at the restaurant). My smoker can't maintain such a high temperature so I only used my oven.

What herbs did you stuff it with? I usually use rosemary thyme and parsley, with slivers of garlic.


I used rosemary, sage and marjoram.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 19 January 2013 - 02:40 PM.

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#234 huiray

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:36 PM


Well, "tang1" (汤 - simplified) (湯 - traditional) *is* the general term for "soup"... ;-)


Yes. That is what I said. However, West Lake soup is traditionally a thick soup and more commonly referred to as 羹 (gēng).

I'm not sure what your point is.


I was expressing my sentiments and my view of a menu where the soups were generally described as "湯".

I'm not sure what your complaint is about.

#235 Keith_W

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:55 PM

Thanks for the recipe Ranz. Chris, I can definitely use my Kamado. It goes up to 400C, enough to cremate the chicken in short order :)
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#236 David Ross

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 06:49 PM

See that's the stuff I love to eat! Something I have no idea how to make, new flavors and textures! This is why I'm working on Taste/Smell-O-Internet.

Steak and eggs - Snake River Farms Wagyu, fresh farm egg, rye toast, port and blackberry syrup

Posted Image
Posted Image


Absolutely delicious. I also love using rye bread in unique ways.

#237 patrickamory

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:33 AM

Some more from Naomi Duguid's Burma book.

Tart garlic chicken, a Shan dish, extremely straightforward and rustic and bursting with hearty flavors. The lime chicken broth is tailor made for wintertime cold - I can't overemphasize how delicious this is:

tart_garlic_chicken.jpg

Pounded Kachin beef with herbs, my second try at this, essentially a salad incorporating Sichuan peppercorns from neighboring China, served with tart-sweet chili garlic sauce on the side:

pounded_kachin_beef.jpg

With jasmine rice and a sturdy barolo, neither dish lasted long.

#238 C. sapidus

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:40 AM

Patrickamory, you are piquing my interest in that book

Old friends visited for dinner last night, and we cooked Italian. No pics at meal time, and few leftovers survived.

Penne with mushroom sauce – Thinly-sliced mushrooms cooked down with sautéed onions and garlic, cooked down with white wine, and then cooked down again with chopped anchovies, tomato, and parsley.

Grilled eggplant with garlic, rosemary, black pepper, and olive oil. Mrs. C planted rosemary in a protected spot in the back garden, so we have been enjoying fresh rosemary frequently.

Mrs. C set out assorted salame beforehand, and ended the meal with a delicious pear dessert, baked and served with a sauce of orange peel, ginger, cinnamon, and honey, and topped with Greek yogurt, honey, and probably some other stuff.

Oliverhill Winery 2006 McLaren Vale Jimmy Section Shiraz

Blurry pic of leftover eggplant

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#239 Mr Holloway

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:28 AM

See that's the stuff I love to eat! Something I have no idea how to make, new flavors and textures! This is why I'm working on Taste/Smell-O-Internet.

Steak and eggs - Snake River Farms Wagyu, fresh farm egg, rye toast, port and blackberry syrup

Posted Image
Posted Image

Damn Dude!!

This is my new screen saver

Killer food porn :smile:

Shane

#240 ScottyBoy

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:37 AM

haha thanks!
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