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Dinner! 2013 (Part 1)


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#91 rarerollingobject

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

Kim, that spread is incredible! And very nice galantine, Ranz, and beef, Peter and bmdaniel.

It's 43C here in Sydney (110F) so too hot for anything but cold food..soba in sesame ginger sauce, with prawns, chicken, and shredded capsicum, green onions and cucumber.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I must get back to melting in this hideous heat...

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#92 C. sapidus

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

RRO - Wow, Australia has had more than its share of extreme weather lately. Looks like a nice, cool meal!

Crock pot beef barbacoa with potato wedges, pureed ancho chiles, chicken stock, roasted garlic, cumin, black pepper, and a shot of cider vinegar. Served over insta-quinoa. Mrs. C put together a green salad with buttermilk cilantro dressing.

We are in the heart of swim season, and this meal met the prime directive – it was ready within seconds after we walked in the door.

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#93 liuzhou

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

Last night was freezing here in southern China, so I made myself some Chinese comfort food. An old but simple family style recipe, slightly adapted.

雪菜炒肉 (xuě cài chǎo ròu) means 'Snow Greens Fried Pork. Served with rice and stir fried Chinese celery.

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'Snow greens' is in fact finely chopped mustard greens preserved with salt.

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Mustard Greens 芥菜 Brassica juncea

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Snow Greens 雪菜

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Snow Greens 雪菜

Traditionally the pork is cut into slivers, but I prefer it minced. Or to be more technical 'haché' - chopped with two cleavers at the same time until finely minced. It is then mixed with garlic, chilli, salt, cornflour and rice wine and briefly marinated. Then stir fried. When the meat is nearly done the snow greens are added. Just before serving a splash of soy sauce is added. Really simple. But just what I needed.

#94 rod rock

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 05:13 AM

I like that Snow Greens Fried Pork, and also i like that combo to serve with celery! Good work!

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#95 rotuts

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 05:13 AM

Excellent Peter ! how tender would you say it was? I do mine at 130.1 but for 6 hours.

cheers, and Yum!

#96 PeterLG

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:53 AM

Appreciate the warm welcome.

Excellent Peter ! how tender would you say it was? I do mine at 130.1 but for 6 hours.

It was semi-perfect. Surprisingly small amount of liquid in the bag after the sous vide, so the result was pretty juicy. Anyways, this was my first shot at doing a whole roast sous vide, so yeah could try 54C next time. I like filet mignon in the 52-53C core temp range, but sirloin seems to work better for me a few degrees higher.

Why six hours? Isn't there a risk of just making the meat "mushy" with longer times (since there's very little collagen)?

#97 rotuts

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:29 PM

I didnt get mushy at 6 hrs. I have gotten mushy at 72 hrs 130.1 for some cuts of chuck but not other cuts of chuck.

I keep a notebook on my results and strongly advise any one embarking on SV to do this.

got mealy skinless CK thighs at 160 for 4 hours, perfect turkey thighs at 12 hours 160.

#98 Jason Perlow

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 05:56 PM

image.jpg tarragon chicken a la Christine Nunn
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#99 Rico

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:06 PM

RRO - 110 Fahrenheit? Geez. That's killer. If there is a way to make it bearable, though, it appears that you've found it. The dish looks great, and the color just pops, you know?

For dinner last night I made some shrimp skewers that had been marinating in a Vietnamese-style ... marinade ... Fish Sauce, oyster sauce, sugar, honey, rice vinegar, garlic and thai chilies. Dipping sauce in the bowl the back.


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Edited by Rico, 08 January 2013 - 07:06 PM.


#100 toolprincess

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:25 PM

New Year's Day meal. Traditional southern foods (pork for moving forward into a new year, greens for prosperity and blackeyed peas for luck) and corn muffins (for tastiness).
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357698299.913985.jpg

#101 Kim Shook

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:37 AM

Basquecook – thank you for your kind words! So many of my holiday foods are recipes made by family and friends. Most of my Christmas night dinner items are from the Christmas dinner that my paternal grandmother made since my dad and his brothers were small. She was a complete non-cook (her refrigerator only contained olives for martinis and Metrical shakes) except for Christmas night when she went all out and cooked the best meal I’ve ever tasted. The chicken salad and pimento cheese are from a lovely lady who used to post here at eG. Old timers will remember Rachel and her wonderful writing. I have been fortunate enough to become her friend and actually meet her and her family. I love the continuity of cooking foods that come from my personal history. My mom’s mousse recipe can be found here: http://www.recipecir...hrimp_Mold.html .

Shane – thank you! Mr. Kim got a jar of jalapeno olives in his stocking and I am stealing your idea of putting them on pizza!

Ranz – the chicken galantine looks delicious!

Tri2Cook – my cousin!!! We’ve missed you so much! Christmas Eve, our house, come early and help me set it all out!

Jason – those scallops sent me scurrying off to Google a recipe for orange cream sauce. Fantastic!

jvalentino – that smoked ham looks amazing. I just emailed Mr. Kim about it.

rico – lovely shrimp and a BEAUTIFUL photo!

Dinner last night started with the inevitable salad:
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I also did Marlene’s Crispy Pork Chops w/ her Quick Tonkatsu sauce, fried rice (left over from dinner out the night before) and collard greens:
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The pork chops were from Omaha Steaks and were, as usual, bland and characterless, but Marlene’s method of coating them and the sauce really ramped up the flavor.

#102 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:19 AM

Well, local weather conditions have conspired to grant me excellent eggplants at the market. And when life gives you eggplants, ratatouille is the obvious answer!

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More details in the ratatouille cookoff thread - this is a take on the dish that doesn't seem to have been mentioned yet....
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#103 Baselerd

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:46 PM

Been done more than a few times, but here's my take on the Momofuku Ramen, with roasted pork belly, pork shoulder, sauteed bamboo shoots, sous vide egg, collard greens, and noodles. I combined the techniques from MC and the Momofuku book to make the broth, which was by far the meatiest, richest broth I've made:

1. Boil and steep kombu 10 minutes
2. Simmer Shiitakes for 30 minutes
3. Simmer whole chicken (cut down) for ~1 hour
3. Roast pork neck bones in oven ~1 hour
4. Strain broth into pressure cooker, cook at 15 psi for 1.5 hours with bones and bacon
5. Add scallion, carrot, onion and simmer for another 45 minute
6. Strain, season with Tare

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Edited by Baselerd, 09 January 2013 - 12:48 PM.


#104 Jason Perlow

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

I decided to do a bit of prep cooking for our superbowl party coming in a few weeks. This will all be vac sealed and will be heated in the bag, ready to go for the game.

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Boston Butts, smoked at 4 hours mark, before wrapping in foil

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Rough pull before saucing.
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#105 scubadoo97

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

Looks fantastic Jason



#106 Jason Perlow

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:17 PM

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Smoked Steak (cooked with the still burning fuel from the BBQ with some hickory wood added) with Montreal Rub
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#107 C. sapidus

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:45 PM

Slipper burgers – Lamb with onion, ginger, garlic, chiles, cilantro, coriander, cumun, cayenne, and black pepper. Potato rolls and Sriracha mayo added after the picture.

Grilled zucchini salad – Dressing of olive oil, lemon juice, parsley, cilantro, cumin, white pepper, and smoked paprika.

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Edited by C. sapidus, 09 January 2013 - 07:47 PM.


#108 huiray

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:58 PM

(http://farm9.staticf...8a8cbd999_o.jpg)
Smoked Steak (cooked with the still burning fuel from the BBQ with some hickory wood added) with Montreal Rub


What's in your "Montreal Rub"? The recipe seems to vary.

#109 SobaAddict70

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:12 AM

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Brussels sprouts "home fries"

Nothing but brussels sprouts, butter, sea salt, black pepper. You can sub out the butter for olive oil to make it vegan.


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Pastina e ceci

This version is "in bianco" (without any tomato).

Contains pancetta, onion, carrot, celery, celery leaves, chickpeas, Italian parsley, sage, rosemary, sea salt, black pepper, pastina pasta and water, along with lashings of extra-virgin olive oil and pecorino Romano cheese. Besides pastina, you can use any kind of soup pasta from conchiglette (small shells) to orzo, or even broken pasta like rigatoni (put rigatoni under some cheesecloth, smash with a kitchen mallet) or torn up larger pasta such as pappardelle. This is a very forgiving dish that you can customize to your heart's content depending on what's in your pantry. The basic recipe typically has garlic, rosemary and tomato, to which you can add other things such as pancetta, peperoncini and/or parsley in addition to the chickpeas. Or make one without tomato, as you see above.

#110 Jason Perlow

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:17 AM


(http://farm9.staticf...8a8cbd999_o.jpg)
Smoked Steak (cooked with the still burning fuel from the BBQ with some hickory wood added) with Montreal Rub


What's in your "Montreal Rub"? The recipe seems to vary.


No idea. We bought it from Penzeys a while back.
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#111 christine007

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:44 AM

Soba, those brussel sprouts are a thing of beauty. I keep forgetting to thank you! my mom is a vegetarian, and you give me such inspiration when I cook for her. thank you!
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#112 SobaAddict70

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:22 AM

anytime, Christine. ;)

#113 rotuts

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:04 PM

I shudder posting in the "Dinner" thread. Although I enjoy my dinners, well sharing them is another matter ...

Chicken Dinner:

Chicken Dinner.jpg

I post this as there is no Chicken in this Dinner.

this is Trader Jose's Chicken-Less Mandarin Orange Morsels (Tofu)

smart-oven'ed until very crispy

1/2 of the 'sauce packet' and a lot of Mae Ploy Sweet Chili sauce and a lot of (frozen) grated ginger.

the bok choi I forgot to add to the basmati rice in the Fuzzy Rice Cooker when the rice is done and in Stay Warm mode, but have done that subsequently.

in the future Ill dump that TJ's fructose packet and use some good orange marmalade with the Mae Ploy and lots and lots of ginger.

some sliced green onions.

pretty good when you want Orange Flavor Chicken and can't get to your local Chinatown.

#114 Jason Perlow

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:35 PM

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Experimental dish tonight. I had smoked several pieces of tofu on the BBQ last night along with the pork and the steak. So I sliced this up and wokked it with minced chicken mixed with a black bean paste and XO sauce, mushrooms, garlic, shallots and green onion, and leftover french green beans.

Edited by Jason Perlow, 10 January 2013 - 05:37 PM.

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#115 janeer

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:05 PM

Jason, Baselard, and SobaAddict70, all beauthiful in their very different ways.

#116 SobaAddict70

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:11 AM

Thanks, janeer.

Tonight:

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Insalata uovo e carne secca (warm salad, with egg and pancetta)

Doable in about 20 minutes, including prep.

Consists of pancetta cooked in olive oil, with mint, sage and rosemary, to which was added some raw beaten egg seasoned with sea salt and black pepper, then scrambled. The greens were dressed with red wine vinegar, a dry red wine, balsamic vinegar, sea salt and black pepper. There's some shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano to garnish, but that was just gilding the lily.


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Spaghetti con vongole (spaghetti with clams)

This is as basic as it gets -- Manila clams, peperoncini, parsley, wine, garlic, olive oil, spaghetti.

#117 SobaAddict70

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:13 AM

I eat A LOT of parsley, so whenever I make spaghetti con vongole, I just go crazy. I must have used something like 5-6 tablespoons worth of finely minced parsley leaves and stems.

I go through something like 2 bunches a week of either flat-leaf or regular parsley.

#118 FeChef

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 01:40 AM

New Year's Day meal. Traditional southern foods (pork for moving forward into a new year, greens for prosperity and blackeyed peas for luck) and corn muffins (for tastiness).
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1357698299.913985.jpg


I had to respond to this. I live in the east coast and we also eat pork on new years day for moving forward. It is also bad luck to eat chicken on new years day because chickens scratch backwards..lol. Here in dutch country we eat our pork with sauerkraut and apples and a touch of brown sugar along side mashed potatoes with pork gravy.

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#119 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:00 AM

Spaghettoni with octopus. The octopus tentacles were cleaned then bagged with a bit of salt, pepper, olive oil, a dried chilli, coriander seeds and cumin seeds. It was bathed at 77C for 5 hours. I peeled off the suckers, chopped the tentacles and set them aside. The sauce was pretty much just some baby romas with a little garlic, bird's eye chilli and parsley.

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Edited by ChrisTaylor, 11 January 2013 - 03:01 AM.

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#120 rod rock

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:40 AM

Yumm nice spaghetti!

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