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Dinner! 2013 (Part 1)


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#1 Jason Perlow

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:45 PM

Midnight BBQ Pork Sandwich, made with pork shoulder smoked earlier this week

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Edited by Jason Perlow, 31 December 2012 - 10:46 PM.

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#2 liuzhou

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 04:08 AM

Dinner in Black and White

Kidneys in Red Wine, served with rice.

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The kidney dish is basically Saint Delia's recipe here, but some large tweaks. The kidneys are pig's kidneys (no lamb kidneys around here); the mushrooms are Agaricus subrufescens or 姬松茸 jī sōng róng, also known as almond mushroom, mushroom of the sun, God’s mushroom, mushroom of life, royal sun agaricus, himematsutake; the bacon is Yunnan beacon (which cost more than the rest of the meal, including the wine!), garlic, onion, dried thyme, chilli, Chilean Merlot.

The rice was cooked in the rice cooker using the dried mushroom soaking liquid, so is a bit off-white.

There was some vegetation served to the side.

And how else to serve it?

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Then some Chinese profiteroles.

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Happy New Year

Edited by liuzhou, 01 January 2013 - 04:17 AM.


#3 Twyst

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 04:48 AM

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Lemongrass sliders from "burma:rivers of flavor" along with some brussels sprouts.



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Khao Soi



Im on a southeast asian kick right now. Got some books for christmas and am steadily working my way through them

Edited by Twyst, 01 January 2013 - 05:06 AM.


#4 scubadoo97

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 06:32 AM

I made a tuna stack for our NYE dinnerImageUploadedByTapatalk1357047153.736523.jpg

#5 munchymom

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 08:56 AM

New Year's Eve dinner:

Cauliflower soup with truffle oil

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Beet salad with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, goat cheese, and pecans

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Filet mignon with baked potato, braised carrots, and sauteed mushrooms

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Edited by munchymom, 01 January 2013 - 08:57 AM.

"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."
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#6 patrickamory

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 10:14 AM

New Year's Eve dinner here was beef stroganoff.

Two pounds of grass-fed Piedmontese tenderloin from Eataly went into this.

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#7 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 10:18 AM

New Year's Eve dinner here was beef stroganoff.

Two pounds of grass-fed Piedmontese tenderloin from Eataly went into this.


Magnificent.
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#8 rotuts

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 10:32 AM

PA: Ive become interested in Grass-Fed. in your opinion what the meat you used 'finished' with corn? if not how would you compare the taste of the GF with 'quality' Feed-Lot beef on the loin? this is perhaps an oxymoron or not.

I personally find 'quality' tenderloin fairly flavorless and its there for the tenderness and the sauce.

the GF Ive tried is CSA sirloin and I SVed it. it had an interesting flavor, rare, and was much denser than FeedLot. it had a much stronger flavor that might not appeal, and that flavor had staying power. in the end Id try it again. but mild it was not.

Soo ... would you buy GF Italian again?

i have my eye on some TJ's GF Fz steaks ( ie one! ) to see how that tasted out.

#9 patrickamory

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:04 PM

rotuts - I agree with you on tenderloin in general, but I know it can be magnificent because I've had it in the porterhouses at Peter Luger's :smile:

Luger's is of course grainfed and dry-aged, and that's normally the way I prefer my steak, but grassfed or grassfed/grain finished can be excellent, it just doesn't have the musty, complex flavors of aged grain-raised USDA steer.

However - this tenderloin was a thing of wonder. Bursting with flavor - it's a brighter, fresher taste than American steakhouse cuts, but wonderful, and I thought something European would be more appropriate for the dish given its Russian origins. Obviously, there is very little fat or tough connective tissue, so the key is cooking it extremely fast. I cut the times in half for this recipe - the pieces were browned at high heat on each side for 30 seconds at the start, and then added to the sauce and just brought back to heat over a very low simmer for maybe a minute or just a little longer. They came out a delicate, perfect medium rare, not just tender (which you expect from filet) but with that herbaceous fresh steak flavor.

To me the grassfed has a more delicate flavor - but I'm comparing to dry-aged grainfed steak.

#10 gfweb

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:07 PM

Actually lunch for one. Just me and the dog today.
Filet with mushroom sauce, fried onions and roasted sprouts.

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#11 BobLee

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:17 PM

Yes, Mr. Perlow, I would agree with you that the New Year's Eve dinner - beef stroganoff looks magnificent.

It is reminiscent of how my wife, Doctor E., prepares stroganoff in our new (primary) retirement home here in the great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina.

Edited by BobLee, 01 January 2013 - 02:18 PM.


#12 percyn

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 04:50 PM

Jason,
Good to see you posting on this thread again!


NYE Dinner:

Basil Pesto Salad
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Roasted Marrow Bones w/Parsley Salad
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Lobster Thermidor (Champagne flute in the background)
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Lobster and Beef Wellington
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#13 patrickamory

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 06:14 PM

My first try from Burma: Rivers of Flavor. Kachin pounded beef with herbs, and tart-sweet chile garlic sauce on the side:

kachin_beef.jpg

#14 Norm Matthews

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 06:31 PM

We always have my Southern mom's traditional ham hocks, collards, black eyed peas and corn bread but the store didn't have hacks so I used a ham bone that was in the freezer. We had it NYE instead of new years day and I mentioned that I was getting tired of this every year and suggested we start something new. Cassie said her dad always had a Mexican shrimp cocktail on New Years Day so I made it for dinner today. Cassie helped. It was good. Better than I thought it would be. We had it with beer and clamato juice.

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Edited by Norm Matthews, 01 January 2013 - 06:54 PM.


#15 robirdstx

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

Looking forward to all the fabulous meals to be posted on this topic in the new year! Our first dinner for 2013 was an old favorite:

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Chicken Pot Pie

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My first, of two, servings:

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#16 patrickamory

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 07:55 PM

robirdstx, how would you feel about posting that chicken pot pie recipe?

#17 SobaAddict70

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 11:21 PM

Pix from tonight:

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Lentil and roasted brussels sprouts salad

This is sort of like a winter tabbouleh, except with Umbrian lentils instead of bulgur wheat or couscous.

The salad consists of three components: the lentils, the brussels sprouts and the dressing.

(1) In a saucepan, combine 1/2 cup dried Italian lentils with 4 cups water, 1 large bay leaf, a large pinch of sea salt, and 1/2 a large onion (diced). Bring to a boil, then simmer for 30 minutes, partially covered, or until lentils are tender. Drain the lentils and set aside. You may want to consider reserving the lentil cooking liquid for another use.

(2) Trim the brussels sprouts of their stem ends (and outer leaves, depending on size). Halve or quarter each sprout, then toss the sprouts olive oil and a pinch of sea salt. Spoon sprouts onto a roasting pan or Pyrex baking dish. Roast for 35 to 40 minutes at 375 F or until the sprouts are crisped on the outside and tender on the inside.

Ideally your sprouts should be done as you're making the dressing.

(3) Combine in a small bowl: 1/4 small onion, minced; enough fresh parsley and fresh mint to make about 6 tablespoons minced herbs; juice of half a lemon; 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil; sea salt and black pepper, to taste. You can alter these proportions to your preference; this is a rough guideline.

(4) Add lentils to the parsley mixture. Stir thoroughly. To plate, spoon some brussels sprouts onto salad bowls, spoon some lentils atop the sprouts, then top with additional minced parsley and mint. Serve at once.


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Pappardelle, with cherry tomato sauce and gremolata.

No, it's not seasonal, but after doing that for a little over a year and being mostly faithful, I think I am entitled to an occasional lapse. :raz:

Adapted from this NYT recipe, except with rocambole garlic instead of normal garlic (if using rocambole garlic, reduce the amount of garlic cloves called for in the recipe by 2/3), and mint instead of basil: http://www.nytimes.c...agewanted=print

#18 basquecook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 02:51 AM



Roasted Pig baby pig, farro salad with carrots, onions, peppers and raisins in a caper raisin sauce. There was truffle polenta, roasted cauliflower topped with serrano ham and bread crumbs, wedge salad with homemade fancy blue cheese dressing and topped with bacon and some pickled beets. A butternut squash lasagna with béchamel, beans boiled in bacon stock and baked with brown sugar and then finally Great NY Noodletowns Ginger Scallion sauce for dipping..

The pig came out really nicely. crispy skin and all that good stuff. Brine for three days, stuffed with vegetables, roasted at 275 until internal temp was around 155. Took out and crisped up at 450.

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#19 robirdstx

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:48 AM

Hi Patrick, thank you for asking. This recipe is easy to make and one of our comfort foods. Leftovers will be for dinner tonight!

Chicken Pot Pie

1 Tbs peanut oil
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/4 cup white onion, chopped
1 can Veg-All (15 oz), drained
2 cups cooked chicken, dark and white meat, diced
2 cans Campbell's cream of potato soup (10 3/4 oz)
1/2 cup heavy cream, half and half, or milk
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
2 Pillsbury refrigerated pie crusts, at room temperature

Heat oil in a sauce pan over medium heat. When oil is hot, add celery and onion and cook until tender. Stir in the next five ingredients and heat through.

Unroll the pie crusts. Lay one crust in a 9 inch pie plate and use a sharp knife to trim edges to rim of plate. Add the filling and top with second crust, fold the edges under and press with the tines of a fork to seal. Make several slits in the top of the crust.

Preheat oven to 425 F. Bake the pie on a cookie sheet (to catch any drips) for 35 to 40 minutes (adding a foil collar to the pie half-way through baking to keep the edges of the crust from getting too brown). Allow the pie to cool for 5 minutes or so before slicing.


#20 basquecook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:48 AM

another photo surfaced from last night:

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#21 huiray

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:39 AM

another photo surfaced from last night:

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I guess this little piggy went to market and never made it home.

#22 MikeHartnett

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:50 AM

My first try from Burma: Rivers of Flavor. Kachin pounded beef with herbs, and tart-sweet chile garlic sauce on the side:

kachin_beef.jpg


Looks fantastic, patrickamory! How did it taste? I almost made it the other night, but went for the warming beef curry with tomato (which is absolutely mindblowing, considering how simple it is).

ETA: Ah- just saw you described it in the other thread. This one's on the list, then.

Edited by MikeHartnett, 02 January 2013 - 10:52 AM.


#23 CKatCook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:35 AM

Pappardelle, with cherry tomato sauce and gremolata.


That pappardelle is beautiful! Did you hand make that?
"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"
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#24 CKatCook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

Hi Patrick, thank you for asking. This recipe is easy to make and one of our comfort foods. Leftovers will be for dinner tonight!

Chicken Pot Pie

1 Tbs peanut oil
1/4 cup celery, chopped
1/4 cup white onion, chopped
1 can Veg-All (15 oz), drained
2 cups cooked chicken, dark and white meat, diced
2 cans Campbell's cream of potato soup (10 3/4 oz)
1/2 cup heavy cream, half and half, or milk
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
2 Pillsbury refrigerated pie crusts, at room temperature

Heat oil in a sauce pan over medium heat. When oil is hot, add celery and onion and cook until tender. Stir in the next five ingredients and heat through.

Unroll the pie crusts. Lay one crust in a 9 inch pie plate and use a sharp knife to trim edges to rim of plate. Add the filling and top with second crust, fold the edges under and press with the tines of a fork to seal. Make several slits in the top of the crust.

Preheat oven to 425 F. Bake the pie on a cookie sheet (to catch any drips) for 35 to 40 minutes (adding a foil collar to the pie half-way through baking to keep the edges of the crust from getting too brown). Allow the pie to cool for 5 minutes or so before slicing.


This is a keeper! Never thought of using potato soup, but makes so much sense!
"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"
-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

#25 SobaAddict70

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 03:12 PM


Pappardelle, with cherry tomato sauce and gremolata.


That pappardelle is beautiful! Did you hand make that?


No, the pappardelle pasta itself was from Eataly. 1/2 lb. for something like $6.

But it's funny you asked if I had made it by hand, as pasta fresca is next up on my "list of things to teach myself". I'll probably give it a go this weekend.

#26 Jason Perlow

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 05:08 PM

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Eggplant and Shrimp with Garlic/Chili/Basil Oyster Sauce

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Edited by Jason Perlow, 02 January 2013 - 05:37 PM.

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#27 Peter the eater

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:01 PM

Percyn, lobster thermidor and marrow parsley salad will be my next surf'n'turf project.
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

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#28 Steve Irby

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:21 PM

I kind of got sidetracked over the new year so tonight's supper was Breast of Pork from Kellers Under Pressure.P1000278(1).JPG
A few other dishes over the past few days included house cured salmon P1000240(1).JPG

And bastardized Oyster Rockefeller meets Casino. P1000220(1).JPG

How about sous vide turkey from http://www.williams-...tml Absolutely the best turkey ever. P1000234(2).JPG

P1000231(1).JPG And a little sausage action.

#29 rarerollingobject

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 08:30 PM

Fantastic NYE's dinners, all! Loved the Burmese kick especially, Twyst. And Steve Irby, of all the beautiful things you've posted, that house-cured salmon looks especially beautiful..

And thank you to everyone for your kind words and well-wishes; I'm still taking food very, very slowly. Weaning myself back onto proper food and have had to make lunch my main meal, so it's my dinner for all intents and purposes. An old favourite; buffalo mozzarella, peach and coppa salad. With some balsamic and pistachio oil.

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#30 patrickamory

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:04 PM

People going crazy with dinner in the New Year! So many delicious looking photos... what jumps out at me is basquecook's pig, obviously, wow.

robirdstx, I'm making that chicken pot pie. Will report back with pictures.

MikeHartnett, yes, that kachin pounded beef is to die for. I could have eaten four times the amount. Incredibly easy too!