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Home Made Ice Cream 2013 -

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#211 jjahorn

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:56 PM

As another chemistry novice I can tell you that gelatine and many of the stabilizers need heat to activate.

I don't believe it really makes a difference if you put your sugar in as you start or have heated it to 40C - I figure that description might have something to do with the equipment they use.

As to bringing it to 82-85C - this is to activate as much of the stabilizer as possible, or for egg based custards to pasteurize it.



#212 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 07:45 PM

Something different.  I am quite happy with my previously mentioned trehalose recipe, to recap:

 

heavy cream 750 ml

whole milk 250 ml

medium/large egg yolks 6

sugar (sucrose) 90 g

trehalose 20 g

kosher salt pinch

vanilla paste 1 tablespoon

 

 

However I've been studying CIA's The Professional Chef (9th edition 2011) and a recipe for Cinnamon Ice Cream (p 1135) caught my eye.  Since they are both CIA books I expected something similar to Migoya, but unless I am misremembering, rather different.

 

Curiosity got the better of me and I cooked up a batch.  Here are the ingredients:

 

milk 8 oz

heavy cream 8 oz

glucose 1/2 oz

salt 1/4 teaspoon

cinnamon stick 1

ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon

sugar 3 1/2 oz

egg yolks 8

 

 

I followed the CIA recipe as closely as I could except not having glucose I substituted trehalose, which on a weight basis has about the same sweetness.  Plugging the numbers into the Ice Cream Geek online calculator...

 

http://www.icecreamg...om/?page_id=817

 

...we see that my standard recipe is 23.8% butterfat, the CIA recipe is 13.5% butterfat, sugar 9.1% to 15.9%, and the CIA recipe is more than twice the percentage of egg yolk!  Keep in mind that both batches are reduced, but Ruben's method (which I use for my recipe) reduces by about 30%, not as much by the CIA method (I did not measure).

 

The mix is in my refrigerator.  Will it be a success?



#213 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 05:19 PM

Verdict on the CIA -- not bad.  Too sweet, of course, but that is probably just me, and I would like more butterfat.  Texture is good.  There is no objectionable iciness (at least not after only seven hours in the freezer).  The large amount of salt in the recipe helps balance the large amount of sugar, it sort of works.  Yield stress is OK.  This ice cream does not serve quite as readily as my reference recipe above, but you'd have to scoop them side to side to see (guilty).  And I'd like a more pronounced cinnamon flavor, if anyone should ask.

 

As nice as the texture and mouthfeel were, next to my reference prepared by Ruben's method there was no comparison.  On the other hand the CIA recipe was quick and easy to throw together.  The same cannot be said of Ruben's method.  Yet if one had a commercial kitchen, as presumably the intended audience of The Professional Chef would have, the procedure of Ruben's method could easily be automated, for example by using a stirring temperature controlled hot plate or rotary evaporator.

 

Thinking about cinnamon ice cream, I really think bay leaf works as well or better, as suggested by lesliec.

 

 

Edit:  the glossary of The Professional Chef makes clear that "glucose" in the recipe is the sugar, and not atomized glucose or glucose syrup.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker, 09 August 2013 - 05:27 PM.


#214 Ruben Porto

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 11:19 AM

Hi Jo! Good to see you still going strong on the ice cream front :smile:  

 

Just wondering whether you have ever tried making Indian ice cream flavours before? I need to get my ice cream making on after a long absence! There are some Indian flavours that sound interesting.



#215 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 04:51 PM

Thanks, Ruben, good to see you back!  Do you mean "Indian ice cream" as from India or Native American?  Both traditions have interesting contributions but I have tried neither and probably shan't any time soon.  However I'm wanting to try using spices that might be considered Indian (the subcontinent), particularly saffron.  Before I start using anything as expensive as saffron, though, I want to improve my extraction methods.

 

MC (2-310) suggests infusing saffron into cold liquid for 24 hr at 3 deg C, rather than a warm extraction.  I know from reading and from my own cooking that crocins (the pretty yellow color) are easily soluable in warm water.  But the flavor components of saffron are not.  I suspect that more saffron flavor will be extracted into alcohol or fat than into water.

 

I got reasonable results pressure extracting licorice in milk, as discussed earlier in this thread.  I'm planning to try cream or a mixture of milk and cream since cream has higher fat.  I plan to work with licorice first as I have a lot of licorice and licorice is not quite as expensive as saffron.

 

Lavender is another flavoring I'd like to try for ice cream.  My lavender plants are in bloom at the moment.  I even spent some time reading about supercritical fluid extraction.  CO2 has a critical pressure of 73.76 bar.  My iSi can reach about 2 bar.  So much for that.  Plan B is to look into culinary essential oils.  Though I'd rather do the flavoring myself, if I could.

 

Fish flavor may be traditional (so I've heard) but it sounds more like what Heston Blumenthal might serve.



#216 lesliec

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 08:33 PM

We visted Arzak in San Sebastian a couple of years ago.  The bacalao ice cream was memorable - in a good way!


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#217 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 09:07 PM

We visted Arzak in San Sebastian a couple of years ago.  The bacalao ice cream was memorable - in a good way!

 

 

I somehow like the idea of bay leaf better but I can only dream of dining at Arzak.



#218 jjahorn

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 02:08 AM

I've tried a few things recently that were close, but not quite good...

 

Bubblegum Ice cream - The bubble gum is dissolved in the warm milk for the flavour.

problem #1 - When set, the chewiness of the gum is also present in the ice - like having too much xanthan gum in a recipe...

problem #2 - I wanted to colour it, and the red I used just disappeared without a noticeable change. The recipe I had called for 5 drops (for 1L mix) - and I probably added 1 tablespoon in the end. No change. Are some food colourings better than others for fats?

 

Mango sorbet - I didn't have enough mango, so I improvised and added grapefruit. Completely overpowered the mango, but I can tell from the little hint that next time a pure mango sorbet will be really good. It is refreshing though.

 

Question: I want to do a high alcohol ice cream. The recipe I have calls for casein and 21DE atomized glucose. I don't have either...

The casein I can only find from body-builder shops sold by the kilo. Does anyone know of a substitute, or a way to buy small amounts?

I understand that atomized glucose is a mix of glucose and starch - so could I mix 20% glucose and 80% starch to have the same?


Edited by jjahorn, 14 August 2013 - 02:09 AM.


#219 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 03:03 AM

I read somewhere (I'm really not sure where) that for bubblegum one had to use bubblegum artificial flavoring, as bubblegum flavor does not exist in nature.  For coloring ice cream red I've seen cochineal recommended.  Though I don't think I have ever used food coloring in ice cream.  (I admit I was tempted to try black food coloring for licorice.)  I believe some food colorings are sold specifically for fats.  Never tried them though.

 

Rose Levy Beranbaum and as I recall David Lebovitz have recipes for alcoholic ice cream.  I've made Beranbaum's recipe a couple times and it was pretty good.  She does not call for any unusual ingredients.

 

I've seen someone selling atomized glucose in small amounts, and they also sold on Amazon.  But it was not there last time I looked for it.  I don't think a mixture of starch and glucose would be a good substitute, as atomized glucose has a range of chain lengths.  Sorry I have no idea about using casein, but you might get by with substituting non-fat milk powder.



#220 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 10:29 PM

Licorice results!

 

This was the licorice I cold pressure extracted in cream, as contrasted with the hot pressure extracted licorice in milk that I used for the batch of ice cream in post #30.  The procedure was to put 50 g coarse chopped licorice root (basically pieces of wood) into 500 ml iSi and add heavy cream up to fill line.  Charge the iSi with one nitrous oxide cylinder.  I had intended to let the cream and licorice sit in the refrigerator for 12 hours, but it was more like 36.  I released the pressure as quickly as I could and strained the contents through an iSi strainer, which is the finest strainer that I have.

 

It was a bit of a mess, as the wood had swollen like a sponge, and I lost about a cup of cream.  In truth it looked like coarsely chopped up steamer clams in bechamel.  I rinsed with 250 ml milk and measured additional cream to 1000 ml total liquid.  The reason for 50 g licorice is that MC suggests 5% scaling for licorice and I made the simplifying assumption that 1000 ml equals 1000 g.

 

The base ingedients and method were the same as usual:

 

heavy cream 750 ml

whole milk 250 ml

medium/large egg yolks 6

sugar (sucrose) 90 g

trehalose 20 g

kosher salt pinch

 

About 3:00 in the morning, in pain, after stirring carefully for an hour at temperature (sometimes I wish I had never heard of icecreamscience), I got the mix into an ice bath and then refrigerated for 12 hours.  I spun for 20 minutes in my Cuisinart ICE-100 and froze for a few hours.

 

The texture and consistency was as wonderful as always by this recipe and method.  However the flavor was unexpectedly different from the batch of licorice I made last spring, not that the batch last spring was bad.

 

The first batch had a strong sweet taste from (I believe) glycyrrhizin, the very sweet chemical in licorice, with green flavor notes (and chartreuse color).  The current batch has faint glycyrrhizin sweetness with subtile floral, perfumey notes.  Color, as far as I can remember, is not as green.  The cream from the cold infusion was light caramel brown.

 

To me licorice root does not have much smell but the flavor is released by chewing it.  According to McGee the flavor components of licorice are paeonol and ambrettolide, neither of which is particularly soluable in water or volatile.  I am not sure what chemical I am perceiving but I like it.  Time for a second bowl.



#221 Jaymes

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 02:05 PM

Last weekend, we made the Browned Butter Ice Cream from Christine Ha's book.  Fans of Masterchef might recall her as a winner.

 

I bought her cookbook because I loved the way her food sounded like it tastes.  Thus far, have not been disappointed.

 

Whole family loved this ice cream and we'll definitely make it again.

 


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#222 bonkboo

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 02:27 PM

Tried my first ice cream recently and just discovered this. I made avocado sriracha ice cream. Worked okay. Was hoping for more savory then what resulted. Would using less sugar than called for, say half, be problematic?

Thread has gotten me thinking ginger next.

#223 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:05 PM

Tried my first ice cream recently and just discovered this. I made avocado sriracha ice cream. Worked okay. Was hoping for more savory then what resulted. Would using less sugar than called for, say half, be problematic?

Thread has gotten me thinking ginger next.

 

Reducing the sugar in an ice cream recipe is problematic as you change the freezing properties.  You could replace all or part of the sugar in the recipe with trehalose to reduce the sweetness.  Trehalose is a sugar that has two glucose units and is about half as sweet as sucrose.  I would not replace all the sucrose in a normal ice cream recipe, but for a savory ice cream replacing all the sucrose might work.  That is the first thing I would try.

 

Trehalose may not be at the corner grocery.  Health food stores might have it.  I purchased my trehalose on amazon.



#224 bonkboo

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:16 PM

Would whole foods likely have trehalose? Thanks for the suggestion. Thinking after the ginger attempt I might try saffron carrot savory.

#225 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 06:00 PM

Would whole foods likely have trehalose? Thanks for the suggestion. Thinking after the ginger attempt I might try saffron carrot savory.

 

From a bit of googling I see that Whole Foods has trehalose listed as "acceptable" on their acceptable ingredients list for selling at Whole Foods.  Whether they actually sell trehalose or not I cannot say.



#226 bonkboo

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 06:08 PM

Thanks @JoNorvelleWalker. What are your thoughts on using saffron in ice cream?

#227 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 06:59 PM

I've never eaten saffron ice cream nor have I tried to make it.  But I plan to.  However mine would be a dessert saffron ice cream, not savory.



#228 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:26 PM

Since a few days ago when Ruben asked about Indian ice cream I have been wanting to try Kulfi.  Tonight we ate at an Indian restaurant and I had my chance.  Unfortunately I did not care for Kulfi.  From what I read on wikipedia I was expecting "a unique smooth mouth feel that is devoid of water crystallisation."  This was not what I experienced.  In fact none of us really cared for it.  My grandson put his kulfi in his coffee.

 

Next we went out to a gelaterie to see if we could do better.  The gelato was well received by all.

 

Finally we sampled my licorice.  This was a disappointment.  My grandson said it tasted like mashed potato and cauliflower ice cream.  "Which is not a bad thing," he added.  On the positive side there is a lot left, which was not the case when they sampled my vanilla.



#229 Bojana

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 02:10 AM

I can barely contain my excitement, my stella musso is alive again, it has finally been repaired. I will get it in a week time and in the meantime, I can dream of flavours to make. Anyone wants to share some lovely autumnal flavours ideas? I am thinking spices, pumpkin, caramel & nuts (always a favourite)...



#230 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 09:04 AM

Wonderful news, Bojana!  I had been thinking about making coconut since this summer I've been playing with pina colada recipes, but I never got around to attempting it, and now, as you say, it's autum.  Yesterday two of my coworkers were discussing salt and caramel.  A couple of weeks ago I sampled salt and caramel at the local ice cream parlor, and it was pretty good.

 

Cardamom and saffron are still on my list to try.  No flavoring at all, other than the eggs and dairy is nice.  And need I mention vanilla?



#231 Bojana

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 01:50 AM

Given that my ice machine came back repaired at the same time with the arrival of my new vitamix, the only ice creams i could really make are modernist cuisine nut gelatos. Did pistachio and hazelnut so far, and hazelnut wins hands down. It tastes like eating nutella from the jar but knowing all fats in there are good for you.

I find that i can get a super smooth texture if i first make the nut paste, and then blend it on high with the water tapioca sugar mixture that the recipe calls for. I am doing the MC at home version but upping sugar to 18%, as per Corvitto. The original MC gelato tasted to savoury for my taste.

My FIL, who repaired the machine, is visiting in 2 weeks. I wanto to make ice cream feast for him. Will report back

#232 Bojana

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:54 PM

Last night, we had a dessert from Eleven Madison Park book, that uses two ice creams: chocolate and salted caramel. I love the book but hate its use of imperial metrics so for ice creams i use recipes from other places. Chocolate is Corvitto (amazing) and caramel is my twist on Jenny (more salt, smoked cream, xantan and dried milk powder added to original). It was a great dessert! qujyvagu.jpg

Edited by Bojana, 16 October 2013 - 09:57 PM.


#233 bonkboo

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 02:11 PM

I tried to make Serious Eats blue cheese ice cream for New Year's Eve and failed. I can only think of the following possibilities: the first go was in a long frozen bowl that had been stored on its side. Manual says not to. Then I poured the unfrozen soup into the fridge overnight (about 18 hours) and the bowl properly seated, and tried again the next day. Would not set.

Any thoughts? Thanks

#234 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 10:31 PM

What is in the mix?



#235 bonkboo

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 05:34 AM

Blue cheese, half and half, lemon juice, sugar, cracked pepper.

#236 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 03:20 PM

Nothing there that should cause an abnormal freezing point depression.  My guess is your equipment is not getting cold enough for some reason.  Check with a good thermometer if you have one.

 

Another good test would be to make a simple recipe from the instuctions that came with the ice cream maker to see how that turns out.



#237 timpoblete

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Posted 05 January 2014 - 03:34 PM

You may also want to check your freezer temperature setting. I recently had issues when someone turned the temperature up on the freezer.

#238 bonkboo

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 05:42 AM

Thanks, I will check those things.

#239 Perrin

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 02:05 PM

Hello,

 

Long time reader, first time poster.

 

I have a question about trimoline (invert sugar).  I made some using the recipe from Chef Eddy posted elsewhere in this thread.  However, it has some crystals in it.  I may not have cleaned the sugar off the sides of the pan very well when I was making it.  I'm wondering if I should melt it and heat it back up the target temperature again, or if a few crystals in it are no big deal?

 

Thanks,

Perrin



#240 Perrin

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Posted 08 February 2014 - 02:38 PM

Well, that didn't work.  I boiled it again and it turned to caramel, and not in a nice way.  I'm trying again from scratch.

 

Where do the rest of you get your trimoline from?  I want to make some ice cream recipes from Corvitto and Laiskonis which call for it.







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